Center for NeuroHumanities College of Liberal Arts

Department of Psychology

Counseling & Psychological Services

Students enjoying the outdoor space along the Third Street corridor.

CAPS will be offering scheduled programs on various topics this semester. Please see options below. You can attend by following the designated link posted. If you have any questions, please contact CAPS at 765-494-6995 and ask to speak with Crystal Cordes, Ph.D., the assistant director for outreach and consultation. Please also consider Purdue's Wellness Programs that also provides presentations about well-being topics relevant to students.

Scheduled Workshops

The following scheduled workshops are for all Purdue students and you do not have to be a CAPS client to attend.

Anxiety Toolbox Workshop

This three-week workshop series is designed to help students both understand their stress/anxiety and to learn the coping skills to manage it.

RSVP for these sessions via link: Anxiety Toolbox Registration

Inner Calm Workshop

This three-week workshop is focused on helping individuals develop skills to better manage difficult emotions and tolerate distress.

RSVP for these sessions via link: Inner Calm Registration

Art of Self-Care

A weekly workshop where students will learn to engage in self-care through art, music, painting, coloring and other creative activities.

RSVP for these sessions via link: Art of Self-Care Registration

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Psychological Sciences

From the neural basis of behavior in non-human animals to interpersonal interactions and relationships, the Department of Psychological Sciences trains students with an expansive understanding of psychology while also combining it with other sciences. Home to the some of the world’s leading psychology experts, the department offers abundant research and education opportunities for both undergraduate and graduate students across a wide range of psychology topics.

Undergraduate Programs

As a student in one of our two undergraduate majors, you’ll gain a broad foundation in psychology and find out what makes people tick by exploring the human brain and mind. The psychological sciences major offers maximum flexibility to tailor coursework to your interests, while the brain and behavioral sciences major emphasizes neuroscience and cognitive science. Students within both majors can earn course credit for work within faculty research labs . You may also apply to our Research-Focused Honors Program beginning in your junior year to conduct an independent research project under the close supervision of a faculty member.

  • Psychological Sciences Major
  • Brain and Behavioral Sciences Major

Graduate Programs

Advance research in one of our six graduate training areas, each culminating in a PhD.

  • Clinical Psychological Sciences
  • Cognitive Psychology
  • Industrial-Organizational Psychology
  • Mathematical and Computational Psychology
  • Neuroscience and Behavior
  • Social Psychology

The department also offers a Graduate Certificate in Psychological Statistics .

Current Student Resources

Undergraduate Students

 Student Organizations

Students interested in research may choose to join the Purdue Undergraduates in Psychology Research organization, while the Psychology Club offers ways for students across the department’s majors to connect with professionals in the field.

Experiential Learning

Collaborate with expert faculty as you conduct life-changing research in our cross-disciplinary labs. Bolster your classroom knowledge through an internship in an applied setting.

Study Abroad

The study of human behavior is greatly enhanced by exposure to different people and cultures, and we strongly encourage all students to consider a study abroad experience. Opportunities include psychology coursework at University College Dublin and the National University of Singapore.

purdue psychology seminars

Department Research

The department’s world-renowned faculty cover a wide range of topics to push the boundaries in the psychology field. Psychological Sciences faculty have developed research programs on topics, including diversity and inclusion, individual differences in behavior, learning and memory, behaviors that prevent individuals from adapting to new circumstances, behaviors associated with food and eating, perception and performance, and social relationships.

student with clock town in the background

Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

Diversity, equity and inclusion is paramount to our learning, research and mental health services in the Department of Psychological Sciences. We offer a variety of courses that examine diversity and inclusion, stereotyping and prejudice, human behavior, ethics, and more. Likewise, we offer opportunities to help support personal and professional growth and foster a sense of connection for Psychological Sciences students through the Purdue Psychology Mentor Program, which provides resources for mentoring relationships for undergraduate and graduate students.

purdue psychology seminars

Community Outreach

Faculty engage with the community in a variety of ways through their research, from investigating mental health in rural Indiana farmers to developing therapies for individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders. The department also offers several clinics to serve individuals and families in the community, including the Purdue Psychology Treatment and Research Clinics, the Adult Services Clinic, the Child Behavior Management Clinic and the Assessment Clinic.

Psychological Sciences Directory

Featured News

Brain gains: Purdue Psychological Fitness Lab supplements Elementary Psychology students’ work

Psychological Sciences graduate student explores connections between multicultural factors and substance use disorder

Purdue Psychological Sciences researcher: Threshold of personality traits dictate narcissism

Connect with Us!

Prospective undergraduate students may register for a session online, email questions to [email protected] or call the Office of Student Services at (765) 494-8533. Prospective graduate students may email our graduate program coordinator Nancy O’Brien, at [email protected] , or call 765-494-6067.

Purdue University Department of Psychological Sciences 703 Third Street West Lafayette, IN 47907

(765) 494-6061

(765) 496-1264

[email protected]

Departmental Resources

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Want direct access to our course data? Contact us .

About the Program

The Psychological Sciences Major provides a broad foundation in psychology, but also provides maximum flexibility in psychology course selection. Students learn about applied and basic aspects of psychology as well as have a chance to take advance courses that give an authentic experience in diverse areas of psychology. This major leaves plenty of space for additional courses in other areas of interest or even allows a minor or double major. This program is often chosen by students interested in careers as therapists or in other human services areas, or by students who plan careers that require only a Bachelor’s degree.

Degree Requirements and Supplemental Information

The full Program Requirements for 2016-17 Psychological Sciences    include all Supplemental Information and selective lists of those categories which a student must fulfill in order to earn their degree. These are intended to be printer-friendly, but include less descriptive course detail.

Please see below for program requirements and the necessary degree fulfillments.

PSYSCI-BS PSYS 120 credits

Major Requirements (36 credits)

A cumulative GPA of 2.3 is required for all PSY courses used to meet major (Areas A-C) requirements

A) Required Courses (9 credits)

  • PSY 12000 - Elementary Psychology [Fulfills Behavior/Social Science Core]
  • PSY 20100 - Introduction To Statistics In Psychology
  • PSY 20300 - Introduction To Research Methods In Psychology

*These courses must be taken at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

B) Select two courses from each of the following groups (12 credits)

  • PSY 20000 - Introduction To Cognitive Psychology
  • PSY 20200 - Introduction To Quantitative Topics In Psychology
  • PSY 22200 - Introduction To Behavioral Neuroscience
  • PSY 31400 - Introduction To Learning
  • PSY 23500 - Child Psychology
  • PSY 24000 - Introduction To Social Psychology
  • PSY 27200 - Introduction To Industrial-Organizational Psychology (if selected, fulfills Management & Leadership Selective)
  • PSY 35000 - Abnormal Psychology

C) Select five additional 3-credit PSY courses numbered 30000-59900 (15 credits)

PSY 31400    & PSY 35000    may NOT be used to fulfill requirement.  Only one of the following 3-credit courses may be used: (PSY courses in this section may also fulfill some Selective Requirements)

  • PSY 31900 - Research Methods In Infancy And Childhood or
  • PSY 39000 - Research Experience In Psychology or
  • PSY 39100 - Readings In Psychology or
  • PSY 49200 - Internship In Psychology or
  • PSY 49800 - Senior Research

Required Courses in Other Departments (18-67 credits)

Cultural/International Diversity Selective (0 -16 credits) * The Cultural/International Diversity requirement may be met by completing ONE of the following options:

Option 1.   Proficiency through level IV in any one foreign language.

  • 10100 - Credit Hours: 3.00 - 4.00
  • 10200 - Credit Hours: 3.00 - 4.00
  • 20100 - Credit Hours: 3.00 - 4.00
  • 20200 - Credit Hours: 3.00 - 4.00

Option 2.   Proficiency through level III in any one foreign language AND a course from Cultural/International Diversity Selective list.

  • select a course from Cultural/International Diversity Selective list

Option 3.   Two courses in any one foreign language AND an approved study abroad experience of at least 6 weeks in duration, which

a) Must take place outside the United States

b) Have significant immersion in the local culture and language independent of any U.S.-based program in which the student may be participating.

  • Study Abroad Experience

Option 4.   An approved semester length (Fall/Spring) study abroad experience

*The Cultural/International Diversity Selective requirement may be waived for international students. See academic advisor for guidelines and approval

Select from list for each

  • Economics/Finance Selective - Credit Hours: 3.00
  • Management & Leadership Selective (IF  PSY 27200    is selected for PSYS Major Area B, this requirement is fulfilled.) - Credit Hours: 0.00 - 3.00
  • Natural Sciences, Math & Information Technology Selective (NSM&IT) - select from  Group 1  list (IF [S] course is chosen, one Science Core requirement will be fulfilled) - Credit Hours: 2.00 - 4.00*
  • Natural Sciences, Math & Information Technology Selective (NSM&IT) - (IF [S] course is chosen, one Science Core requirement will be fulfilled) - Credit Hours: 2.00 - 5.00*
  • Natural Sciences, Math & Information Technology Selective (NSM&IT) - Must have lab component unless one of the other NSM&IT courses selected has lab component (IF [STS] course is chosen, Science Technology & Society Core will be fulfilled) - Credit Hours: 1.00 - 5.00*
  • Social Ethics Selective (IF  PSY 46400    is chosen for PSYS Major Area C, this requirement is fulfilled.) - Credit Hours: 0.00 - 3.00
  • [Humanities Core] (IF a foreign language is chosen for Cultural/International Diversity Selective, this requirement is fulfilled.) - Credit Hours: 0.00 - 4.00
  • [Information Literacy Core] (IF  ENGL 10600    or  10800    is chosen for Written Communication core, this requirement is fulfilled.) - Credit Hours: 0.00 - 3.00
  • [Oral Communication Core] (Recommend  COM 11400 - Fundamentals Of Speech Communication   ) - Credit Hours: 3.00
  • [Quantitative Reasoning Core]    MA 15300    OR higher from University list except  MA 15555    (IF [QR] is chosen for NSM&IT selective, this requirement is fulfilled.) - Credit Hours: 0.00 - 5.00
  • [Science Core] (IF [S] course is chosen for NSM&IT Selective Group 1, this requirement is fulfilled.) - Credit Hours: 0.00 - 5.00
  • [Science Core] (IF [S] course is chosen for NSM&IT Selective, this requirement is fulfilled.) - Credit Hours: 0.00 - 4.00
  • [Science, Technology & Society Core] (IF [STS] course is chosen for NSM&IT Selective, this requirement is fulfilled.) - Credit Hours: 0.00 - 3.00
  • [Written Communication Core] (Recommend  ENGL 10600 - First-Year Composition    or  ENGL 10800 - Accelerated First-Year Composition   ) - Credit Hours: 3.00 - 4.00

*NSM&IT Selectives must total 9 or more credits.

Courses that fulfill Psychological Sciences Core requirements may also be used to fulfill Selective requirements, if applicable.

Courses that fulfill major requirements (Areas A-C) may also be used to fulfill Selective requirements, if applicable.

Electives (17-66 credits)

At least 32 credits of coursework required at 30000 level or higher.

120 semester credits required for Bachelor of Science degree.

University Foundational Learning Outcomes List

https://www.purdue.edu/provost/initiatives/curriculum/course.html

Program Requirements

Fall 1st year.

  • PSY 12000 - Elementary Psychology (Behavior/Social Science Core)  ♦
  • Oral Communication Core - Credit Hours: 3.00
  • Cultural/International Diversity Selective - Credit Hours: 3.00 **
  • MA 15300 - Algebra And Trigonometry I or higher (Quant. Reasoning Core) ♦  except for MA 15555    
  • Elective - Credit Hours: 2.00
  • Info. Literacy Core ( PSY 10000    recommended) - Credit Hour: 1.00

Spring 1st Year

  • PSY Area B2 - Credit Hours: 3.00
  • Written Com. Core ( ENGL 10600    recom.) - Credit Hours: 4.00
  • Cultural/International Diversity Selective - Credit Hours: 3.00 **
  • Sci/Math/InfoTech Selective + Sci. Core - Credit Hours: 3.00 ***

Fall 2nd Year

  • PSY 20100 - Introduction To Statistics In Psychology ♦
  • PSY Area B1 - Credit Hours: 3.00
  • Sci/Math/InfoTech Selective + Science Core - Credit Hours: 3.00 ***
  • Elective - Credit Hours: 3.00

Spring 2nd Year

  • PSY 20300 - Introduction To Research Methods In Psychology ♦
  • Humanities Core - Credit Hours: 3.00 ****

Fall 3rd Year

  • PSY Area C - Credit Hours: 3.00
  • Sci/ Math/InfoTech Selective + STS Core - Credit Hours: 3.00 ***

Spring 3rd Year

  • Social Ethics Selective - Credit Hours: 3.00 ****

Fall 4th Year

Spring 4th year.

  • Management & Leadership Selective - Credit Hours: 3.00 ****

*Typical credits shown, but will vary with specific course selections; 120 total credits required. At least 32 of these credits must be courses taken at Purdue and numbered 30000 or higher.

**Depending on language placement and Option selected, requirement might require fewer than 4 semesters to complete, potentially creating opportunities for additional electives to be taken.

***Assumes Selective and Core requirement will be fulfilled with one appropriately selected course. Requirements can be separated, if student prefers.

****Includes course option that can cover two or more requirements concurrently.

STS = Science, Technology & Society

Foreign Language Courses

Foreign Language proficiency requirements vary by program.  For acceptable languages and proficiency levels, see your advisor:

American Sign Language, Arabic, Chinese, French, German, (ancient) Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish

Critical Course

The  ♦  course is considered critical. A Critical Course is one that a student must be able to pass to persist and succeed in a particular major.

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Catalog Contents

Psychology (ps).

PS115: Psychology Program and Profession

This course introduces you to the discipline of psychology and the Bachelor of Science in Psychology degree programs. The field of study, skill sets, and issues related to various psychological fields will be discussed. You will research the psychology degree and course offerings along with your professional goals in order to map out your specific degree plan and career goals.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS124: 🌐 Introduction to Psychology

This course provides a broad introduction to the field of psychology, one of the social sciences. You will be introduced to a range of topics that offer insight into human thought and actions including what motivates us to study human behavior, ethical decisions, problem-solving, and theories on memory, learning, intelligence, and personality. This course will highlight the use of critical thinking and the application of the concepts through the use of credible research.

PS124M1: Methods and Research in Psychology

Explain basic research and scientific methods used in psychology.

Quarter Credit Hours: 1 | Prerequisite: None

PS124M2: Biology in Psychology of Daily Living

Relate the role of biology in psychology to activities of daily living.

PS124M3: Theories of Personality Development

Discuss theories of personality development.

PS124M4: Behavioral, Developmental, and Cognitive Psychology

Describe how the study of psychology is relevant to career interests.

PS124M5: Psychological Disorders

Describe signs and symptoms of psychological disorders.

PS200: Introduction to Cognitive Psychology

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basic principles and theories of cognition including topics such as perception, attention, memory, decision making, and language in both children and adults. The course will also examine the brain regions involved in cognitive processes. Students will learn why an understanding of cognitive processes is important for psychology professionals and will apply the principles learned to a variety of settings.

PS210: History of Psychology

This course explores the historical origins of psychological study and the influences that have shaped contemporary views of the field. You will learn about the origins of the study of the mind, the social and cultural factors that shaped the scientific approach to psychology, and modern-day applications of psychology. You will also be introduced to the major theories and theorists in this discipline.

PS215: Neuroscience

This course will provide you with a foundational understanding of the basic concepts of neuroscience as it applies to the practice of psychology. The aim of cognitive neuroscience is to explore the biological factors that influence behavior. This course provides an introductory study of brain development, imaging, neural framework, mental processes, and more.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: PS124

PS220: Child and Adolescent Psychology

This course will explore the physical, cognitive, emotional, social, moral, and personality development of human beings from conception through the end of adolescence. You will develop an understanding of developmental theories and research methods used to investigate developmental change, the theoretical bases for our understanding of how human beings change, and the contextual and cultural factors that impact the growth and development of children.

PS225: Ethics in Applied Behavior Analysis

This course provides an in-depth study of the Ethics Code for Behavior Analysts. You will use the ethical model of decision-making in a real-world scenario and explain the processes involved with reporting ethical violations to the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB). This course focuses on the following sections of the Code: Responsibility as a Professional, Responsibility in Practice, Responsibility to Clients and Stakeholders, Responsibility to Supervisees and Trainees, Responsibility in Public Statements, and Responsibility in Research.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: PS360 ; Open to Applied Behavior Analysis students only

PS230: Practical Applications of Ethics and Program Management

This course provides an overview of ethical considerations in the applied behavior analysis (ABA) field. You will explore the Behavior Analyst Certification Board's (BACB) code of ethics, and relate the codes to diverse scenarios. Additional topics include functional behavior assessment and goal preparation to enhance supervisee performance.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: Open to Applied Behavior Analysis students only

PS300: Research Methods I

This course addresses the research methods used in psychology and the strengths and weaknesses of each approach. You will learn when it is appropriate to use one method over the other and how to evaluate the accuracy of the conclusions of a study. You will also gain direct experience with finding and using information in academic research articles, conducting a naturalistic observation, and administering and analyzing surveys. Finally, the course also addresses ethical considerations related to conducting research in psychology.

Quarter Credit Hours: 6 | Prerequisite: None

PS311: Ethical Practice in a Diverse World

This course provides an in-depth study of the laws, ethics, confidentiality requirements, and best practices that guide clinical work in professional settings. The course provides you with a foundation in basic ethical theory as well as an understanding of diverse populations and knowledge of confidentiality laws. You will practice making ethical treatment decisions in real-world scenarios.

PS330: Personality Development

Personality is defined as a consistent pattern of thinking and behaving; it is the basis of "who we are." The theories regarding the development of personality are numerous, and each contributes to the understanding of the factors that define one's personality. This course examines the major psychological theories of personality. You will also examine abnormal personality development.

PS340: Exceptional Needs Children

This course examines the use of applied behavior analysis in the school setting. The roles of teachers, parents, and other relevant "others" will be investigated in relation to current ABA practices, which include mainstreaming, inclusion, least-restrictive environment, behavior intervention plans, functional behavior assessments, and individual education programs.

Quarter Credit Hours: 6 | Prerequisite: Open to Applied Behavior Analysis students only

PS345: Language and Speech Development and Disorders

This course examines the processes of language development in children, while integrating psychological theories and perspectives to explain this human phenomenon. You will be able to examine the progress of children with normal language development as well as those showing signs of problems. The course will provide case studies and clinical applications to prepare you for the clinical challenges you will face in your professional careers.

Quarter Credit Hours: 6 | Prerequisite: PS220

PS350: Working With Children in a Diverse World

This course provides an analysis of the cultural factors that impact human development in childhood. Topics include development of cultural identity, the process of acculturation, and the impact of cultural background on social and educational experiences. Students will also explore strategies for working with diverse populations of children and techniques for creating an environment that is respectful and responsive to the needs of this population.

PS360: Applied Behavior Analysis I

This course examines the behavior theory, principles, and procedures related to modifying existing behaviors and acquiring new behaviors. You will begin to understand behavior modification techniques, such as reinforcement, punishment, extinction, discrimination training, generalization, shaping, classical conditioning, conditioned reinforcement, and schedules of reinforcement, by applying these behavior principles to real-world scenarios.

Quarter Credit Hours: 6 | Prerequisite: PS340 ; Open to Applied Behavior Analysis students only

PS365: Applied Behavior Analysis II

This course builds on Applied Behavior Analysis I to further examine the dynamics of behavior principles. In this course, you will explore advanced Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) theories and apply them to case studies. You will be able to explain how behavior-environment relationships play instrumental roles in behavior deficits or excesses. This course also will provide you with information on obtaining certification and licensing in the ABA field. Although certain programs at the University are designed to prepare you to take various certification or licensing exams, the University cannot guarantee you will be eligible to sit for or pass those exams.

Quarter Credit Hours: 6 | Prerequisite: PS360 ; Open to Applied Behavior Analysis students only

PS370: Health Psychology

You will explore various models and theories of health psychology, examine current research, understand the psychosocial factors involved in the onset and treatment of physical disease and illness, and study the impact of stress on mental and physical health. The interaction of mental health and physiology will be highlighted through the study of chronic problems such as heart disease, cancer, and eating disorders. You will examine the relationship between health psychology and the study of substance use disorders, including the impact of substance use on physical and psychological well-being. Special concerns of substance users will be addressed through examination of diverse topics such as tobacco use and HIV and hepatitis risk factors and treatment. You also will learn to develop and implement educational health psychology programming and to explain how health psychology principles will apply in therapy.

PS375: Psychology of Addiction

This course examines the prevention, development, diagnosis, and treatment of substance use disorders among youth and adults. Material is presented from a clinical perspective, including practical application of diagnostic techniques, especially pertinent for students intending to pursue a career in prevention or treatment of substance use disorders. Topics include the role of the brain in addiction; diagnostic criteria for substance use disorders; psychosocial factors involved in the development and maintenance of addiction; and models of education and treatment programs. You will explore substance use disorders among diverse populations.

Quarter Credit Hours: 6 | Prerequisite: PS124

PS377: Models of Peer Recovery

This course will provide the standardized knowledge required to develop competency of peer support needed to serve as experiential-based professionals. The course will include Recovery-Oriented Systems of Care (ROSC), crisis management, identification of indicators of substance use and/or co-occurring disorders for referral, service planning and coordination, community/family education, HIV/AIDS, ethics, and documentation including screening and intake.

PS380: Clinical Psychology

This course explores the foundations of clinical psychology, including the evolution, practice, and application of psychology in clinical settings. You will examine ethical and legal considerations in counseling, the roles and responsibilities of therapist and client, clinical skills, diversity issues, and professional development opportunities. Current topics related to clinical practice will also be covered.

PS385: Targeted Topics in Applied Behavior Analysis

This course provides an overview of the fundamental principles of applied behavior analysis (ABA) and the strategies derived from those principles. This course will cover diverse scenarios to apply basic concepts and theories of ABA, including ethical considerations regarding supervisees and trainees. Topics to be covered include behavior measurement considerations, experimental design, reinforcement and punishment, extinction, behavior change systems, intervention considerations, maintenance and generalization of skills, supervisee and trainee goals and performance expectations, and ethics. The course content is based on the basic behavior-analytic skills, client-centered responsibilities, and supervision areas of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) Task List.

Quarter Credit Hours: 6 | Prerequisite: PS365 ; Open to Applied Behavior Analysis students only

PS390: Introduction to Industrial/Organizational Psychology

You will explore industrial/organizational (I/O) psychology in the workplace by examining the historical influences, theories, and current perspectives of the field. You will discuss the ethical standards for employees and research in the field as well as some practical applications for work organizations. You will acquire foundational knowledge of industrial psychology, such as personnel selection, training and development, and performance appraisal. You will also explore the theories of organizational psychology, including work motivation, job satisfaction, and stress.

PS391: Psychology of Leadership

This course provides an overview of leadership theories and approaches in traditional and virtual workplaces. You will learn how to critically think about the leadership process. You will examine effective leadership competencies related to leading self, developing and leading others, and leading performance and change including ethics in leadership. Best approaches to develop impactful leaders will be discussed.

PS392: Attitudes and Motivation in the Workplace

This course provides an overview of the major theories and findings in research on motivation and attitudes. You will explore individual differences, employee attitudes, and motivation. Additionally, you will be introduced to motivational strategies and models of performance to understand the effects on personal and professional behaviors and success in the workplace.

PS410: Screening and Assessment

This course provides an overview of the strategies and tools that are used for the screening and assessment of various age groups. Topics include the history and purpose of assessment, ethical considerations, interviewing, and an intensive overview of functional behavioral assessment. You will learn how to apply screening and assessment information to your work with children, adolescents, and adults.

PS420: Social Relationships in Childhood

Current issues in theory and research in developmental psychology will be examined specific to the importance of social relationships in childhood. Topics include emotional development and attachment, cognitive development and social understanding, the importance of peers, how the influence of the family changes as children mature, and the social landscape of adolescence.

PS430: Program Design and Evaluation

This course focuses on the process for designing programs that meet the needs of multiple populations using basic principles of applied behavior analysis (ABA). It builds on fundamental concepts of designing individual behavior management programs, and research methods using concepts in organizational behavior management.

Quarter Credit Hours: 6 | Prerequisite: PS410 ; Open to Applied Behavior Analysis students only

PS440: Abnormal Psychology

This course presents an integrative and multidimensional perspective to the fascinating field of abnormal psychology. You will acquire basic knowledge of various psychological disorders including depression, anxiety, and psychotic and mood disorders. You will be introduced to how abnormal behavior is defined, assessed, and diagnosed using the current classification system, as well as the limitations of assessment. The course will provide an overview of the various models used to understand psychological disorders and the therapeutic approaches used to treat them. Additionally, you will be given an overview of the legal, economic, and sociocultural influences on abnormal behavior and the mental health system to gain a greater understanding of how mental illness affects all in our society.

PS450: Case Management in Clinical Settings

This course provides an overview of case management in clinical settings, including analyzing client needs. You will be introduced to the systems theory and models of case management, which will be used as a context to discuss the evaluation and assessment of client strengths and needs, treatment planning, administration of services, working within a treatment team, and discharge planning.

PS451: Selection and Assessment in Organizations

This course will introduce you to employee selection, assessment, classification, and placement in organizations. The course explores the ethical, legal, and professional contexts of assessment and selection along with measurement of individual differences, performance appraisal and feedback, and program design and evaluation. Finally, you will cover ways psychology is applied in organizations to improve employee and team performance.

PS452: Psychopharmacology of Alcohol and Drugs

This course provides an in-depth study of the properties of alcohol and illicit drugs and their neurochemical effects on the brain. You will gain knowledge of each of the specific drug classes, basic pharmacology of psychoactive drugs, science of addiction, and the therapeutic use of medically managed prescription drugs in treatment.

PS496: Bachelor's Capstone in Industrial Organizational Psychology

The capstone course for undergraduate industrial organizational psychology provides you with the opportunity to integrate and apply learning from your industrial organizational psychology program of study in a comprehensive manner. You will assess the impact of educational experiences on personal and professional growth, ethical perspectives as well as critical thinking skills. You will reflect on and evaluate the benefits of lifelong learning and the impact of these elements on your future.

Quarter Credit Hours: 6 | Prerequisite: Last term of study or approval of the Dean

PS497: Bachelor's Capstone in Addiction

This capstone course is the culminating experience for the Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Addictions. You will apply and synthesize concepts learned in each of the major courses. The capstone course provides the opportunity to integrate and evaluate concepts/theories learned throughout coursework in several original and personalized assignments and to assess your level of mastery of the stated program.

PS498: Bachelor's Capstone in Applied Behavior Analysis

This capstone course is the culminating experience for the Bachelor of Science in Psychology in Applied Behavior Analysis. This course serves as a final evaluation of competencies learned from coursework completed within the program. The capstone course provides you with the opportunity to integrate and synthesize the knowledge and skills acquired throughout your program and to assess your level of mastery of the stated outcomes of your degree.

PS499: Bachelor's Capstone in Psychology

This capstone course is the culminating experience for the Bachelor of Science in Psychology. This course builds on the concepts of all the courses you have taken within the program of study. The capstone course provides you with the opportunity to integrate and synthesize the knowledge and skills acquired throughout your coursework in several original and personalized assignments and to assess your level of mastery of the stated outcomes of the degree program.

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    The Department of Psychological Sciences at Purdue University is pleased to host the seventh installment in its symposium series. This biennial event showcases

  6. Department of Psychological Sciences

    Courses · PSY 10000 - Introduction To The Science And Fields Of Psychology · PSY 12000 - Elementary Psychology · PSY 12300 - Beyond Mental Health: The Science Of

  7. Department of Psychological Sciences

    Courses · PSY 10000 - Introduction To The Science And Fields Of Psychology · PSY 12000 - Elementary Psychology · PSY 12100 - Topics In Psychology For Students Of

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    This three-week workshop

  9. Psychological Sciences

    Brain gains: Purdue Psychological Fitness Lab supplements Elementary Psychology students' work.

  10. PSY 67800

    The Purdue course catalog bulletin lets you search for every class and course for every major offered at the West Lafayette campus.

  11. PSY courses at Purdue University

    Elementary Psychology · PSY 12300. Beyond Mental Health: the Science of Well

  12. Program: Psychological Sciences, BS

    A) Required Courses (9 credits) · PSY 12000 - Elementary Psychology [Fulfills Behavior/Social Science Core] · PSY 20100 - Introduction To Statistics In Psychology

  13. Psychology (PS) < Purdue University Global

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    Psychological Sciences. Nov 16󰞋󰟠. 󰟝. Join us for another weekly seminar from Dr. Thekla Morgenroth. #psychology #Purdue #UnderGrad #gradschool. Margo