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What size should my slides be, 16:9 or 4:3?

July 3, 2017 by Laura Foley 2 Comments

Deciding on a slide format used to be easy when there was only one choice. Nowadays, you can choose between 4:3 format or 16:9. What do these numbers mean and which size should you choose for your presentations?

What the numbers mean

The above notation is called the “aspect ratio,” or the ratio of the width to the height of the slide. In the 4:3 aspect ratio, the dimensions are 1024 x 768 pixels (10.67″ x 8″); the height is 3/4 of the width. Back in the Ye Olde Days of PowerPoint, it was your only choice. Why? Because that’s the aspect ratio of actual slides, pictured above, television screens, and early computer monitors.

When high-definition screens came on the scene in the early 2000s, they were built in a 16:10 aspect ratio. But as more and more high-definition screens were manufactured, it became clear that screens with a 16:9 aspect ratio were cheaper to manufacture. So the 16:9 aspect ratio (1920 x 1080 pixels or 13.3″ x 7.5″) became the new standard.

What size should you choose?

From boardrooms to computer monitors to smartphone screens, 16:9 is the default screen aspect ratio so that’s the slide size I always go with. The 16:9 format gives you a lot of slide real estate to play around with! The legacy 4:3 aspect ratio, while still used, creates smaller slides and doesn’t look that great on newer screens.

How do you change an old 4:3 deck to the new 16:9 format?

Oh, this is super-fun to do and you’re a lucky duck if it becomes your job.

To resize your slides go to the Design tab on the ribbon and select Slide Size/Widescreen on the right side of the screen.

slide size

After you select the new size, this window will appear:

Slide scaling window

Now you’re faced with either everything on the slides being stretched out or squished to fill the space. Oh boy! Either way, after you make your selection you’ll need to go through the presentation slide by slide to ensure that everything looks good. This can be fairly straightforward if the creator of the presentation stayed within the template or a real pain in the rear if he/she didn’t. But do go through the deck to ensure that everything looks right.

If you’re a production artist that charges by the hour, reformatting an organization’s slides from 4:3 to 16:9 could be a nice little gig for you!

Other slide sizes for special events

Now, the 16:9 format is great for everyday use but what if you’re designing a presentation for an event? Last year, I was designing slides for a corporate conference where the setup included multiple, massive screens. For that event, the slides measured 52″ x 17″ and had a “leave this space blank” area on the bottom. Each event is different, so if you’re working on slides like these you need to become friends with the AV folks and find out what size slides they recommend for optimal viewing on that particular setup. The last thing you want to see on a gigantic stage are distorted graphics!

Bottom line

Unless you’re told otherwise, use the 16:9 format. You get a lot more space on each slide for your visuals and it’s really the way things are going.

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How to Change Your PowerPoint Slide Size (16:9 vs. 4:3)

  • PowerPoint Tutorials
  • March 10, 2019

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to change your slide size in PowerPoint.

That way you can create slides for any situation including on-screen presentations, printed documents, posters, postcards, handouts, etc.

First off, the two most used PowerPoint slide sizes are:

  • 16:9 ratio  for onscreen presentations and new overhead projectors. This is the default setting for the latest versions of PowerPoint.
  • 4:3 ratio  for printing slides on standard 8.5 x 11 pieces of paper as handouts.

When starting with a blank PowerPoint presentation, changing your slide size is super easy and straightforward. If not, there are a few issues you’ll need to deal with, each covered below.

That’s why it’s worth figuring out what slide size you need BEFORE you build your presentation. If you later convert your presentation to a different size, it can be painful!

It’s just like the old carpenter saying, “measure twice and cut once.” In PowerPoint, you’ll want to “ask twice (to double confirm the required size) and build once.”

Changing your PowerPoint slide size does not make your PowerPoint presentation larger or smaller. To reduce your PowerPoint file size, you need to learn how to compress a PowerPoint presentation .

Table of Contents

How to change your powerpoint slide size.

By default, new PowerPoint presentations start in the 16:9 slide size format.

This is the NEW standard for most modern overhead projects and monitors and is recommended for most presentations. That said, you can easily change your slide size to something else.

To change your PowerPoint slide size, click the Design tab, open the Slide Size dropdown and choose the size for your slide

To change your slide size in PowerPoint, simply:

  • Navigate to the  Design tab
  • Open the  Slide Size  drop down menu
  • Select  4:3 ,  16:9  or  Custom Slide Size  (see options below)

When starting with a blank presentation, you are now good to go. You will not have to worry about any of the conversion issues discussed below.

Notice too, how much wider the 16:9 slide size is versus the 4:3 slide size in the picture below. The new size gives you more room for the content on your slides.

Comparison between the four by three and sixteen by nine slide sizes in PowerPoint

When you are converting an existing presentation to a new slide size, you will additionally be given the following prompt:

“You are scaling to a new slide size. Would you like to maximize the size of your content, or scale it down to ensure it will fit on the new slide?

presentation ppt size

Maximize  leaves all your content as is on your slide, even if it no longer fits on the new slide size that you selected.

Ensure Fit  scales down your content in proportion to the new slide size you have selected. You will only see this option when moving from a larger slide size to a smaller one.

Custom PowerPoint slide sizes

Choosing  Custom  for your slide size gives you additional options to work with. Inside the dialog box you can choose your size on the left and your orientation on the right.

presentation ppt size

On top of that, you can also input your own custom slide size. However, I recommend using one of the preset PowerPoint dimension options.

  • On-screen show (4:3)
  • Letter Paper (8.5×11 in)
  • A3 Paper (297×420 mm)
  • B4 (ISO) Paper (250×353 mm)
  • B5 (ISO) Paper (176×250 mm)
  • 35mm Slides
  • On-screen Show (16:9)
  • On-screen show (16:10)

For your orientation options on the right-hand side of the dialog box, you can choose between  Landscape  and  Portrait .

In most situations, you will want one of the default settings. Best practice is  Landscape  for your presentation slides and  Portrait  for your printed notes, handouts and outlines.

Comparison of the portrait and landscape orientation for PowerPoint slides

Issues when converting 4:3 to the 16:9 slide size in PowerPoint

When converting an existing 4:3 presentation with content into the 16:9 format, you are not given any conversion options. Instead, PowerPoint simply does the conversion for you, which can create several problems.

There are two issues you will face in the new 16:9 slide size.

When converting from four by three into the sixteen by nine slide size, your images will be stretched and distorted

The first issue is that all the images on your slide master (including company logos) will be stretched to fit the new, larger slide size.

To fix the stretched images, you will need to fix those images (or reinsert them) on your slide master, as if you were creating a PowerPoint template from scratch.

presentation ppt size

The second issue you will face in the larger 16:9 slide size is that you will have a lot of extra white space on your slides.

While you can leave the space blank, doing so will make your content look weird. Ideally you don’t want a lot of white empty space like that on your slides. Especially since all your font sizes will be so small.

That’s why if you have the time, I recommend resizing your content to fill in the white space. You can do this by either increasing the font size of your content, or adding additional visuals that support your message.

Issues when converting 16:9 to the 4:3 slide size in PowerPoint​

When converting an existing 16:9 presentation to the 4:3 slide size, you are given the option to either  Maximize  or  Ensure Fit  (both covered below).

1. The Maximize option

This option means that the content on your slides will not be resized to fit the 4:3 slide size. The same is true if you move to any smaller slide size.

when converting from the sixteen by nine to the four by three slide size, none of your content will be properly resized to fit the smaller slide size

Maximize Issue #1:  All the images on your slide master (including your company logo) will be distorted.

You might also have issues with other content placeholders, slide backgrounds or anything else that was built on your slide master.  For these issues, you’ll first need to navigate to your Slide Master. Once you are there, you either adjust (or rebuild) your PowerPoint template so that everything fits properly.

Maximize Issue #2:  Your content will not be scaled down to the smaller slide size. Instead, you’ll have overhanging content as pictured above.

For these kinds of spacing issues, you will need to work through your slides to adjust your content.

One recommendation as you move from the larger 16:9 slide size to 4:3, is to break up your slides. Take the contents from one larger slide and break it into two (or even three) separate slides.

Breaking up your content is preferable to just cramming more content on the smaller slide space. Doing so will make your content easier to read when presented on an overhead projector.

2. The Ensure Fit option

This option means that PowerPoint will scale down your content to fit the smaller slide size based on the size you selected.

when converting from the sixteen by nine to the four by three slide size, your images will be distored and you will have extra white space around the content of your slides

Ensure Fit Issue #1:  Distorted images, slide backgrounds and anything else that PowerPoint had to automatically resize on your slide master.

To fix these issues, you’ll need to navigate to your slide master and adjust (or rebuild) your template to make everything fit.

Ensure Fit Issue #2:  Your content will be scaled down to fit your new slide size, leaving you with a lot of white space. In addition, all your font sizes will be smaller, making them hard to read.

For small content like this, you’ll need to work through your slides and resize your content accordingly. Keep in mind the people at the back of the room too when choosing a new font style and size.

Saving your custom slide size as a PowerPoint theme

If want to use your own custom slide size for all your future PowerPoint presentations, you can save and set it as a PowerPoint theme.

This is a two-step process as discussed below.

1. Save your custom slide size as a theme

To save your custom slide size as a PowerPoint theme, from the Design tab, select save current theme, name the theme and click save

To save your custom slide size (and settings) as your own custom PowerPoint theme, simply:

  • Open the M ore options
  • Click  Save Current Theme
  • Name your Theme (and don’t change the file location it saves to)
  • Click  Save

2. Set your custom theme as the default

To set your custom theme as the default theme, from the design tab, find your custom theme, right-click the theme and select set as default theme

To set a custom PowerPoint theme as the default for all your future presentations, simply:

  • Open the  More options
  • Right-click  your custom theme
  • Select  Set as Default Presentation
  • Close out of PowerPoint (and do not save any presentations if it prompts you)

Once you’ve set your own custom theme as the Default Presentation, it will open every time you start PowerPoint. This saves you from always having to switch your slide sizes.

So that’s how you can change your PowerPoint slide size, either before or after you create your presentation.

And although you are given a lot of flexibility in the slide sizes you can choose from, I recommend using the default slide sizes as used by most people.

It’s also important to remember that switching slide sizes after you have built your presentation can be a total pain. So, to the extent possible, figure out your PowerPoint slide size first before you build out your presentation.

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How to change the size of slides in Microsoft PowerPoint

The actual size(s) of the slide is less important than the aspect ratio. By default, slides in presentations that you create from the Blank Presentation template are set to Widescreen size.

To change the size of your presentation slides, on the Design tab, in the Customize group, click the Slide Size button and then:

Notes : The Standard slide size:

  • 1600 x 1200
  • 2048 x 1536
  • 2560 x 1920
  • Matches the aspect ratio of standard tablet screens
  • Exactly fills the screen in the Slide pane and when printed on a tablet.

Notes : The Widescreen slide size:

  • 1920 x 1080
  • 2048 x 1152
  • 2560 x 1440
  • Does not match the aspect ratio of standard tablet screens
  • Has empty space above and below when printed on a 4:3 screen.
  • Click Custom Slide Size... :

Custom Slide Size in PowerPoint 365

In the Slide Size dialog box:

Slides sized for drop-down list in PowerPoint 365

  • Choose the slide orientation in the Orientation group.

After choosing the necessary options, click OK . The Microsoft PowerPoint dialog box will show two options on how to scale the existing slides to a new slide size:

Scaling options in PowerPoint 365

Maximize the content size or scale it down to Ensure Fit it on the new slide.

Note : It is impossible to change the size or orientation just for some slides.

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How to compress pictures in the presentation

How to compress pictures in the presentation

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10 Ways to Compress PowerPoint Presentations to Reduce File Size

Compress PowerPoint presentations to reduce file size represented by large and small PowerPoint icons.

10 Strategies to Compress or Reduce the Size of Large PowerPoint Presentations

by Avantix Learning Team | Updated September 21, 2023

Applies to: Microsoft ®  PowerPoint ® 2013, 2016, 2019 and 365 (Windows)

You can compress or reduce the size of large PowerPoint presentations in several ways. The most common strategy to reduce the size of a PowerPoint file is to compress pictures, video and audio. However, you can also use other methods to make files smaller including saving media and PowerPoint files in other formats and converting or removing embedded objects.

In this article, we'll look at 10 ways to compress or reduce the size of a PowerPoint presentation:

  • Compress pictures
  • Insert pictures instead of copying and pasting
  • Use smaller image files
  • Convert images to a different file type
  • Save a copy of images with artistic effects
  • Compress audio and video
  • Link to audio or video files
  • Convert Excel charts and other embedded objects
  • Save a copy of large PowerPoint files
  • Save a copy in PDF format

Note: Buttons and Ribbon tabs may display in a different way (with or without text) depending on your version of PowerPoint, the size of your screen and your Control Panel settings. For PowerPoint 365 users, Ribbon tabs may appear with different names. For example, the Picture Tools Format tab may appear as Picture Format.

To view file size in PowerPoint:

  • Click the File tab in the Ribbon.
  • Click Info. In the Properties area, file size is listed beside Size.

Microsoft PowerPoint File Info pane which displays properties including file size.

Once you've completed the following strategies, close and save the PowerPoint file, reopen it and check the file size again. You can also view file size in Windows 10 File Explorer or Windows Explorer in older versions of Windows.

Recommended article : How to Embed a YouTube Video in PowerPoint

Do you want to learn more about PowerPoint?  Check out our virtual classroom or live classroom  PowerPoint courses >

1. Compress pictures

One of the most common ways to reduce file size is to compress one or all of the pictures in your PowerPoint file. You may want to try this with one picture at a time to be sure you are satisfied with the result after compression.

To compress a picture:

  • In Normal View, select a picture on image on a slide.
  • Click the Picture Tools Format or Format Picture tab in the Ribbon.
  • In the Adjust group, click Compress Pictures. A dialog box appears.
  • Select the check box to Apply only to this picture if you want to compress only the current picture or uncheck this option if you wish to compress all pictures in the presentation.
  • Select the check box to Delete cropped areas of pictures if you have cropped images and want to permanently delete the areas you have removed by cropping.
  • Choose the desired document resolution.

PowerPoint compress pictures dialog box to reduce file size.

Don't forget to check pictures in Slide Master View (click the View tab in the Ribbon and then click Slide Master) as you may want to compress or delete those images as well.

Also, be sure to check image(s) after you compress them to be sure to are satisfied with the quality of the image(s). If you create a copy of the presentation before compressing the image(s), you can revert to the original if necessary.

2. Insert pictures instead of copying and pasting

It's best to insert pictures, rather than copying and pasting (or dragging and dropping) into the PowerPoint file. When you copy and paste (or drag and drop) an image into a presentation, it can lose compression, change file type and also bring in other data that can increase file size.

To insert a picture onto a PowerPoint slide:

  • In Normal View, display the slide where you want to insert a picture.
  • Click the Insert tab in the Ribbon and click Pictures (2013 and later versions) or Picture (2010). You can also click the Pictures or Picture icon in a placeholder on a slide. A dialog box appears.
  • Navigate to the location of the picture.
  • Select the picture and click Insert or double-click the picture.

You also have the option of linking to a picture file by clicking the arrow beside Insert in the Insert Picture dialog box and then choosing Link to File. However, the picture is not actually "in" the file (which reduces file size) and if you email the document, the pictures will not be included. If you use this strategy, it's best to copy the picture to the same folder as the PowerPoint presentation and be sure to bring the entire folder with you when you deliver the presentation.

3. Use smaller image files

It's best to insert pictures in smaller sizes to reduce the size of your PowerPoint files. For example, if you are inserting pictures from a phone taken at a high resolution, this will result in larger PowerPoint decks. Create, save or send images at a lower resolution and insert the lower resolution images into your PowerPoint files.

If you're using stock images, select images at the lowest resolution (at the quality level you require). You can also open an image in an image editing program (such as Microsoft Picture Manager or Adobe Photoshop) and then save it at a lower resolution.

In PowerPoint 365, one of the biggest culprits causing inflated file size is 3D models. Although 3D models are not inserted as pictures but rather as 3D models, they are images. One 3D model we inserted took up 17 MB of space. You can't compress 3D models like other types of images so you may need to delete 3D models or use a picture instead of a 3D model if file size is an issue.

4. Convert images to a different file type

Prior to inserting an image in PowerPoint, you can open it in an image editing program (such as Microsoft Picture Manager or Adobe Photoshop) and then use Save As to save the image in another format.

The format that will result in the smallest size is usually JPEG (Joint Photographic Experts Group format) or JPG. The JPEG compression algorithm significantly reduces the file size of images.

You can also save images in PowerPoint in different formats:

  • Right-click the picture. A drop-down menu appears.
  • Select Save As Picture. A dialog box appears.
  • Navigate to the folder where you want to save the image.
  • Enter a name for the file and select a format such as JPG or PNG.
  • Click Save.
  • In the PowerPoint presentation, delete the original image.
  • Click Insert and then click Picture(s).
  • Navigate to the location with the image you saved.
  • Double-click the image.

5. Save a copy of images with artistic effects

When you apply an artistic effect to an image, PowerPoint retains two copies of the image (the original and a copy with the artistic effects). This allows the user to reset the image but can significantly increase file size. Compressing pictures also doesn't normally have any effect on images where you have applied artistic effects.

If you have applied an artistic effect (such as blur) to an image, you can reduce file size using the following method:

  • Right-click the image with the artistic effect. A drop-down menu appears.
  • Enter a name and select a file type (usually JPG or PNG).
  • In the PowerPoint presentation, delete the image with the artistic effect.
  • Navigate to the location with the image you saved with the artistic effect.

6. Compress audio and video

In 2010 and later versions of PowerPoint, audio and video files are copied into presentations rather than linked to the original files. You can improve playback performance and reduce PowerPoint file size by compressing audio and video files in your presentation.

Files can be compressed at different quality levels.

In PowerPoint 2013 and 2016, you can compress to the following quality levels:

  • Presentation Quality – select this option to save space but maintain overall audio and video quality.
  • Internet Quality – select this option and quality will be comparable to media which is streamed over the web.
  • Low Quality – select this option if space is limited, such as when you are sending presentations via e-mail.

Compress media options in PowerPoint older versions to reduce file size.

In PowerPoint 2019 and 365, you can compress to the following quality levels:

  • Full HD (1080p) – select this option to save space while maintaining overall audio and video quality.
  • HD (720p) – select this option to save space and the quality will be comparable to media which is streamed over the Internet.
  • Standard (480p) – select this option when space is limited, such as when you are sending presentations via e-mail.

The following compression options appear in PowerPoint 2019 or 365:

Compress media options PowerPoint 2019 or 365 to reduce file size.

Note: Some older video file formats may not compress or export properly. Embedded subtitles and alternate audio tracks will be lost in the compression process.

To compress media in PowerPoint:

  • Open the presentation that contains the audio or video files you want to compress.
  • Save a copy of the presentation so you can retain a copy of the file with the original media.
  • In the copy, click the File tab in the Ribbon.
  • Click Info.
  • In the Media Size and Performance area, click Compress Media. A dialog box appears.
  • Select the desired compression option. A dialog box appears indicating that media compression is in progress. PowerPoint will indicate how much space is saved.
  • When compression is complete, click Close.

Compress media dialog box in Microsoft PowerPoint to reduce file size.

7. Link to audio or video files

You also have the option of linking to audio or video files. When you insert an audio or video file, click the arrow beside Insert in the Insert dialog box and then choose Link to File. Linked audio or video is not actually "in" the presentation (which reduces file size) and if you email the presentation, the media files will not be included if you have linked to audio or video files. Linking was the default behavior in PowerPoint 2007 and earlier versions for video and larger audio files.

If you choose to link to audio or video files, t's best to copy the media files to the same folder as the PowerPoint presentation and be sure to bring the entire folder with you when you deliver the presentation.

Note: You cannot apply certain types of formatting to linked video files.

8. Convert Excel charts and other embedded objects

Embedded objects such as Excel charts or worksheets can also increase file size. If you convert embedded objects to images, it can impact the size or your presentation. You can also reduce file size by breaking links to Excel files.

If you want to convert embedded objects into pictures, you can ungroup them or cut and paste them back into PowerPoint.

To ungroup an object:

  • Select the chart or embedded object.
  • Click the Format tab in the Ribbon. This tab may appear as Drawing Tools Format, Drawing Format or Shape Format.
  • Select Group and then Ungroup. A dialog box appears asking if you want to convert the object to a PowerPoint object.

To cut an object and paste it back into a presentation as a picture:

  • Select the embedded chart or object.
  • Press Ctrl + X to cut it.
  • Click the Home tab in the Ribbon.
  • Click the arrow below Paste to display the drop-down menu and then choose Paste Special.
  • Select an image type (such as JPEG) and click OK.

 PowerPoint paste special dialog box to compress embedded files and reduce file size.

If you have links to Excel files, you can reduce file size using Edit Links to Files. Check out How to Break, Update or Change Links to Excel Charts or Worksheets in PowerPoint for more information on how to break links.

9. Save a copy of large PowerPoint files

It's a good idea to save a copy of a large PowerPoint files periodically using Save As and give the file a different name (i.e. Sales Presentation and the date). If you save a copy using Save As, version history and some editing data is removed during the process and this will reduce file size. This can also help avoid corrupted files.

To save a copy of a PowerPoint presentation:

  • Choose Save As. If necessary, click Options or More Options. A dialog box appears.
  • Navigate to the desired location.
  • Enter a new name for the presentation.

10. Save a copy in PDF format

It's also common to save a copy of a presentation as a PDF (portable document format) file to reduce the size and then share it with others. You can compress images during the process.

To save a PowerPoint presentation as a PDF (and compress images):

  • Choose Save As and then click Options or More Options if necessary. A dialog box appears.
  • Navigate to the desired location and enter a name for the file. You can use the same name since the extension will be different (PDF).
  • Under File Type, select PDF.
  • Click Tools on the bottom right of the dialog box. A drop-down menu appears.
  • Select Compress Pictures. A dialog box appears.
  • Click the desired compression option.

Large file size is a common problem in PowerPoint and you can use these strategies to reduce the size of your PowerPoint presentations. Compressing the size of your decks should also help to improve speed and avoid crashes.

This article was originally published on November 6, 2016 and has been updated for clarity and content.

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More resources

How to Change Slide Size in PowerPoint

How to Get Slide Design Ideas Using PowerPoint Designer

How to Morph in PowerPoint to Design Engaging Presentations

How to Break, Update or Change Links to Excel Charts or Worksheets in PowerPoint

Where to Find Free Images for Your PowerPoint Presentations (10 Great Stock Photo Sites)

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You can fade a picture in PowerPoint by drawing a rectangle shape on top of the picture and then filling the rectangle with a gradient from opaque to transparent. This technique is often used to fade an image into the background of a slide. Since the rectangle is placed on top of the image and then text may be placed on top of the rectangle, you may need to reorder the objects.

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How to Lock an Image, Shape or Other Object in PowerPoint

You can now lock an image, shape or other object in PowerPoint. Objects can be locked in Normal View or Slide Master View. Only PowerPoint 365 users can lock objects to prevent moving and resizing. This is helpful if you want to select and move other objects on the slide or prevent others from moving or resizing an object. You can lock items using the context menu or the Selection Pane.

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10 Ways to Compress PowerPoint Presentations to Reduce File Size

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How-To Geek

How to reduce the file size of a powerpoint presentation.

Need to chip off some KB from your presentation's file size? Try some of these handy tips.

Quick Links

Convert your presentation to the pptx format, insert your pictures—don’t copy and paste, do image edits in an image editor—not in powerpoint, compress all of the images in your presentation, don’t use embedded fonts, link to files instead of embedding them, don’t store a thumbnail for the presentation, remove personal and hidden information from your presentation, turn off autorecover, copy everything into a new presentation, a possibility: unzip the presentation and compress it.

Considering that Microsoft PowerPoint presentations are generally accompanied with tons of images, gifs , embedded videos , charts , graphs, and other content, it’s no surprise that you get some pretty big files. Here are a few steps you can take to reduce a presentation's file size.

Large files can be annoying. They take up loads of precious disk space, slow down playback performance, and can cause emails to bounce back due to exceeding the file size limit. You can prevent all of these things by reducing the file size of your presentation.

We’ve mentioned it before, but the first thing you’d think of when considering file size reduction is images—and for a good reason. Image files can be quite large. There are steps you can take to reduce the size, such as compressing the images in the presentation. If you suspect the reason your PowerPoint file is so large is due to images, then be sure to read the article we’ve written on how to reduce the size of Office documents that contain images .

Related: How to Reduce the Size of a Microsoft Word Document

We do have some additional tips to add if you followed these steps but still need to reduce your presentation’s file size.

Microsoft released the PPTX format in Office 2007. Still, it’s not uncommon to see PPT files floating around. So what’s the difference between a PPT and PPTX  file? The PPTX version compresses all of the content within the presentation. If you have a PPT file and convert it into a PPTX file, you’ll notice a decrease in the file size.

Converting the file is as simple as pressing a button and choosing the file type. Go ahead and open your PPT file, head over to the “File” tab, and then click “Convert.”

Convert presentation

Windows File Explorer will appear. You’ll notice the Save As type is set as "PowerPoint Presentation." This is the PPTX file type. Click “Save.”

Save as type

Your PPT file will now be converted to a PPTX file. As you can see, the size of the file has been reduced.

reduced file example

HTG Presentation 2 is our PPT file, and HTG Presentation 3 is our PPTX file. Merely converting the file type reduced the size by 335 KB.

While this isn’t a breathtaking drop in file size, we managed to reduce a Word document file size from 6,001 KB to 721 KB. It all depends on what’s inside the file. With any luck, this will be the only step you need to take. If not, keep reading.

It’s tempting to copy and paste an image in PowerPoint instead of using the insert function. This won’t be an issue if you’re not concerned about file size, but if you are, then beware of copy and paste—it may reformat your image to BMP or PNG. Why is this an issue? Both of those file formats are larger than JPG.

png to jpg conversion size difference

You can see in the above screenshot that the PNG file is 153KB compared to the 120KB JPG file of the same image. Each time you copy and paste a JPG file to PowerPoint, and it gets converted to PNG, you’re adding a bit of unnecessary file size to the presentation. Using the insert function will ensure your images are inserted as intended.

When you insert an image in PowerPoint, it’s best to make sure that it doesn’t need any edits. If it does require edits, you’re better off doing it in an image editor. Why? When you use PowerPoint to edit your image, it stores all of those edits as part of the presentation. For example, when you change an image to black and white, PowerPoint retains the full-color image as well. That’s a lot of extra bites being stored.

If you don’t have an image editor ( you do ) or you simply must use PowerPoint, be sure to tell PowerPoint to discard all of that excess data saved from the edits . It won't save you as much space as working in a dedicated editor, but it will help.

You can compress images in PowerPoint one at a time or all at once. If you’re looking to do the latter, here’s how.

Open your presentation, head over to the “File” tab, and then select “Save As” in the left-hand pane.

select save as option

Next, select “More Options,” which you'll find under the area where you would name your file and choose the file type.

More Options in Save as tab

The “Save As” window will appear—this time with a few extra options available to you. Next to the “Save” button, click “Tools.”

Tools in save as dialogue box

In the drop-down menu that appears, select “Compress Pictures.”

Compress pictures option in tools

The “Compress Pictures” window will appear. Here, you can choose the resolution type of the images (based on PPI) in the presentation. You’ll also notice that you’re not able to select the “Apply only to this picture” option in the “Compression Options” group. That’s because, due to the way we accessed this tool, this option isn’t available.

Note:  If you do want to compress a single picture, select it and then head to Picture Tools Format > Compress Pictures.

Once you’re happy with your selection, click “OK.”

compress pictures window

Be sure to save your presentation afterward.

We get why you might want to embed fonts—you might be making a Star Wars themed presentation and, as a result, anyone you may be sharing the presentation with is not likely to have those special fonts available to them. Embedding the fonts in your presentation could prevent issues down the line, but it comes at the cost of increased file sizes.

In general, unless you are sure you need to display a particular font, we recommend turning off font embedding.

Head over to the “File” tab and select “Options” at the bottom of the left-hand pane.

Options at bottom of lefthand pane

On the “Save” tab, untick the “Embed fonts in the file” checkbox and then click “OK.”

uncheck embed fonts box

We saved a copy of our presentation with all fonts embedded, without fonts embedded, and with only the fonts used in the presentation embedded. Look at the difference if file sizes:

difference in file size with embedded fonts

Convinced yet?

Consider the difference in file size if you embed an entire YouTube video in your presentation instead of linking back to it. Embedding an entire video will significantly increase the size of your presentation. There are certainly some valuable benefits when embedding a file vs. linking to it (such as when the recipient might not have internet access to play the video), but if the file size is an issue, just don’t do it.

Way back when Office let you save thumbnail images of your presentation so that you could get a sneak preview of the file when searching for it in File Explorer. Windows has grown to be more sophisticated, so it no longer requires the help of Office applications to do this. But, the option is still available.

We ran a little test to see the difference in file size with and without this option enabled. Here are the results:

don't save thumbnail

With the thumbnail option enabled, our file size was 2,660 KB. Without the option enabled, the file size was reduced to 2,662 KB, saving a total of 7 KB.

This is a pretty small save, but when we tested it with a Word document, the difference was significant, showing 721 KB without the option enabled, and 3,247 KB with the option enabled.

While this is a large gap between applications and it’s not exactly clear why the difference is so large, it’s still an option worth exploring. To disable the feature, open your presentation, head over to the “File” tab, and then select “Properties” found on the right-hand side, then “Advanced Properties.”

select properties

You’ll now be in the “Summary” tab of the “Properties” window. At the bottom of the window, uncheck the box next to “Save preview picture,” and then click “OK.”

uncheck save preview image

Microsoft Office will store your personal information (such as author name) and hidden properties within your presentation. Getting rid of this information can save you a bit of space.

Open your presentation, head over to the “File” tab, select the “Check for Issues” option, then select “Inspect Document."

Inspect Document

The “Document Inspector” window will appear. Make sure the “Document Properties and Personal Information” box is checked, and then click “Inspect."

Inspect the document

In the next window, select “Remove All.” The information will now be removed, saving you a few KB of space.

We don’t necessarily recommend this, and it should only be used as a last resort effort. AutoRecover is an essential tool in Office, and if you’ve ever lost a document before saving, then you understand precisely what we mean.

Each time Office uses AutoRecover, it adds a little to the size of the file. To turn AutoRecover off, head over to the “File” tab and select “Options” found at the bottom of the left-hand pane.

In the “Save” tab of the “Options” window, uncheck the box next to “Save AutoRecover information ever xx minutes.”

uncheck autorecover option

If you save and exit out of the presentation immediately, you won’t notice a difference. Over time though, as you continue to progress through the presentation, the AutoRecover feature will add KB to your file.

While you’re creating your presentation, PowerPoint will save various things in the background to help you out. We’ve mentioned how to turn off a lot of these features, delete data PowerPoint saves, and so on, but there’s always a chance something slipped through the cracks, and PowerPoint stored some information you don’t need. Copying your content over to a new presentation may be a good solution to the problem.

This may be a bit of a hassle though as, with PowerPoint, you’ll need to copy and paste each slide (and master slides). Once you do though, the new presentation won’t have any of the previous background saves, AutoRecover information, or previous versions of the file. As a result, you should see a change in file size.

While we can’t tell you exactly how much this will reduce your file size since each presentation will be different, it’s worth a shot.

As we mentioned earlier, a PPTX file is a compressed file (which is why the size is much smaller than an old-school PPT file). This means you can open it with a tool such as 7-Zip or WinRar, extract all the files from your PPTX, add them to a compressed archive, and then rename the archive to a PPTX file extension.

We had some issues here, though.

In Rob’s testing with his Word document, it successfully reduced the size of the file from 721 KB to 72 KB. However, it corrupted the file in the process. In my testing with my 2,614 KB file, it didn’t corrupt it, but it only reduced it to 2,594KB—a total of only 20 KB. We’re unsure what’s at play here, so if you want to give this a go, be sure to have a backup copy of your file before doing so.

That’s all the tips we've got for reducing the size of your PowerPoint presentation. We’re always looking for new and interesting ways to reduce the size of our files, so if you have any tips, let us know in the comment section, and we’ll be happy to test them out!

  • PowerPoint Slide Size

PowerPoint Slide Size report

presentation

The most common PowerPoint slide ratios are "4:3" and "16:9". In previous versions of PowerPoint, the slide size was 4:3, widescreen, and high-definition formats have been adapted for TV and video. The default slide size in new versions of PowerPoint is widescreen (16:9). And the PowerPoint slide size can be changed by the following method.

The PowerPoint slide size also needs to be adjusted to cover the entire screen for different monitors and devices. You can often see some special proportions of slides at the press conference. In this case, [Custom Slide Size] is used. The following post will explain different PowerPoint Slide sizes and change them.

PowerPoint Slide Size Guide

Whether you are preparing your presentation for a class or your work, you should adapt it to the device which will be used for projecting it. Some devices or even laptops can have different sizes, so you will need to change the dimensions of your presentation. To change the size of your presentation slides, on the Design tab, in the Customize group, click the Slide Size button and then choose one of the pre-defined sizes.

PPT Slides Sizes

Common PowerPoint Slide Sizes

  • Standard (4:3) was the default slide size in older versions of Microsoft PowerPoint, like 2003 or 2007. Standard (4:3) slides have a size of 10 x 7.5 inches or 25.4 x 19.05 cm.
  • Widescreen (16:9) is the default slide size in Microsoft PowerPoint 2013, 2016, and 365. Widescreen (16:9) slides have a size of 13.33 x 7.5 inches or 33.867 x 19.05 cm.

4:3 is best viewed on a standard computer screen, while the 16:9 is best viewed on a widescreen computer screen or TV. Using the proper dimensions ensures the presentation is scaled suitably not to appear warped. Widescreen is the default in most versions of PowerPoint.

Custom PowerPoint Slide Size

Using a custom PowerPoint slide size is possible if the default 4:3 or 16:9 options are unsuitable. You might choose to use a custom slide size if you are printing full-size PowerPoint slides using a custom page layout, for instance. To do this, select Design > Slide Size > Custom Slide Size to display the "Slide Size" options menu.

Custom PowerPoint Slide Size

  • From the Slides sized for the drop-down list, you can choose pre-defined popular sizes, such as Letter Paper (8.5 x11 in), Ledger Paper (11 x 17 in), A3 Paper (297 x 420 mm), etc.
  • Enter the custom sizes in the Width and Height fields.
  • Choose the slide orientation in the Orientation group.

You can run your slideshow on a computer screen, a television screen, or a projector. It is best to know your display device upfront. It would be best to change your slide dimensions before designing your slides before adding shapes and images to slides. Changing the dimensions afterward is possible, but it can ruin your slide design. If pictures are distorted, you will need to manually resize each image or delete them and insert them again.

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Art of Presentations

What is the Size of a PowerPoint Slide in Pixels?

By: Author Shrot Katewa

What is the Size of a PowerPoint Slide in Pixels?

When creating a PowerPoint presentation, it is essential to determine the appropriate size for your slides. Understanding the size of a PowerPoint slide in pixels is crucial to ensure that your presentation looks great on all devices, from desktops to mobile devices.

The standard size of a PowerPoint slide is 1024×768 pixels and the widescreen PowerPoint slide is “1920×1080” pixels. It can also be adjusted based on your preferences or the requirements of the platform on which you plan to present your slides.

In this article, we will discuss the standard size of a PowerPoint slide in pixels or inches as well as how to adjust it to fit your needs. Let’s get started!

1. What is the Size of a PowerPoint Slide in Pixels?

In Microsoft PowerPoint, there are multiple preset slide sizes available. You can also customize the size of the slide using the “Custom Slide Size” feature available in the application. Depending on the slide size you select, the size of the slide in pixels will vary.

1.1 What is the Size of a PowerPoint Standard Slide in Pixels?

presentation ppt size

The “Standard (4:3)” option in Microsoft PowerPoint used to be the only size option in the beginning since most screens from 2010 and before were that size. The standard slide size in PowerPoint is “1024×768” pixels. 

1.2 What is the Size of a PowerPoint Widescreen Slide in Pixels?

presentation ppt size

In Microsoft PowerPoint, the default size of the slides is the “Widescreen (16:9)” option. The widescreen PowerPoint slide is “1920×1080” pixels.

2. What is the Size of a PowerPoint On-Screen Show Slide in Inches?

In Microsoft PowerPoint, the size of the slides is mostly measured in inches. Using the “Slide Size” dialog box, you can check the dimension of a slide in inches. Depending on the type of the selected slide, the slide size varies. There are three different “On-Screen Show” slide sizes available in Microsoft PowerPoint.

2a On-Screen Show (4:3)

presentation ppt size

The “On-Screen Show (4:3)” slides are “10×7.5” inches in size. This is the “Standard” slide size.

2b On-Screen Show (16:9)

presentation ppt size

The “On-Screen Show (16:9)” slide size is “10 x 5.625” inches in dimension. This is the “Widescreen” option which is the default slide size in PowerPoint.

2c On-Screen Show (16:10)

presentation ppt size

The “On-Screen Show (16:10)” slides are “10 x 6.25” inches in width and height respectively.

3. How to Find the Size of the Slide in Inches?

Using the “Slide Size” dialog box in Microsoft PowerPoint, you can find the size of the slides in your presentation in inches. To do so, follow the 3 quick steps.

Step-1: Click on the “Design” tab

presentation ppt size

In the menu ribbon located at the top of the screen, click on the “Design” tab. This will open the “Design” menu.

Step-2: Click on the “Slide Size” option

presentation ppt size

In the “Customize” group of the “Design” menu, click on the “Slide Size” option. Then click on the “Custom Slide Size” option in the dropdown menu under the “Slide Size” option. This will open a dialog box.

Step-3: Click on the “OK” button

presentation ppt size

In the “Slide Size” dialog box, you can now see the size of the slide in inches in the “Width” and “Height” boxes. Then click on the “OK” button at the bottom of the dialog box to close it.

4. How to Change the Size of a PowerPoint Slide?

In Microsoft PowerPoint, you can change the side of the slides using the “Design” menu. However, you can only change the size of all the slides in a presentation at once. To change the size of the slide in PowerPoint, follow the 3 simple steps.

presentation ppt size

The first step is to open the “Design” menu. To do so, click on the “Design” tab in the menu ribbon located at the top of the screen.

presentation ppt size

In the “Customize” group of the “Design” menu, you have to now click on the “Slide Size” option. This will open a dropdown menu containing the preset slide size options available in PowerPoint.

Step-3: Click on your preferred slide size

presentation ppt size

Finally, all you have to do is click on your preferred slide size option from the preset options available in the dropdown menu under the “Slide Size” option. The available slide sizes are “Standard” and “Widescreen” .

4.1 How to Customize the Size of a PowerPoint Slide?

The “Custom Slide Size” feature in Microsoft PowerPoint allows you to customize the size of all the slides in a presentation. Using the feature, you can set any dimension to the slides in your presentation. To customize the size of the slides in a presentation, follow the 7 easy steps.

presentation ppt size

The first step is to open the PowerPoint presentation file where you want to customize the size of the presentation slides. Then click on the “Design” tab in the menu ribbon located at the top of the screen to open the “Design” menu.

presentation ppt size

The next step is to click on the “Slide Size” option in the “Customize” group of the “Design” menu. In the dropdown menu, the default slide size is the “Widescreen (16:9)” option.

Step-3: Click on the “Custom Slide Size” option

presentation ppt size

Now all you have to do is click on the “Custom Slide Size” option at the bottom of the dropdown menu under the “Slide Size” option in the “Design” menu. This will open a dialog box.

Step-4: Click on the “Slide sized for” option

presentation ppt size

In the “Slide Size” dialog box, click on the “Slides sized for” option. Then click on the “Custom” option at the bottom of the dropdown menu under the “Slides sized for” box.

Step-5: Click on the “Width” box

presentation ppt size

In the “Slide Size” dialog box, the next step is to click on the “Width” box. Now you can type in your preferred width of the slides in inches. You can also use the up and down arrows in the “Width” box to increase or decrease the width of the slide respectively.

Step-6: Click on the “Height” box

presentation ppt size

The next step is to customize the height of the slides. To do so, click on the “Height” box in the “Slide Size” dialog box and type in your preferred slide height in inches. You can also click on the up or down arrows in the “Height” box to adjust the height of the slides to your preference.

Step-7: Click on the “OK” button

presentation ppt size

Finally, all you have to do is click on the “OK” button at the bottom of the “Slide Size” dialog box to save the custom size for the slides in the presentation file.

A collage of colorful PowerPoint designs organized into tidy rows

5 golden rules of PowerPoint design

february 6, 2024

A smiling woman with blonde hair, glasses, and a leopard print cardigan poses with her hands on her hips in front of an olive green background.

by Deb Ashby

Wondering how to design the perfect PowerPoint presentation? It's easier than you think–just follow five simple rules to get started:

1. Consider using templates

When building a slide deck, it’s important to maintain consistency throughout. We want to ensure we are using consistent font styles, colors and themes. This can be tricky when designing from scratch, so why not start from a template?

Microsoft Create contains hundreds of pre-made, customizable PowerPoint templates, which means you don’t have to start from scratch and the fonts and colors are already set for you.

Simply choose a template from the gallery, customize it as needed, and you are done!

Screenshots of slides in a branded PowerPoint presentation, in hues of navy, maroon, and brown.

2. No walls of text

We’ve all seen PowerPoint presentations where slides contain too much text. The human brain struggles to listen and read at the same time. If you are presenting to an audience, keep the text on slides to a minimum.

Consider employing the “5-5-5" rule. No more than 5 lines, no more than 5 words, no more than 5 minutes. Think short and sharp memory joggers instead of rambling paragraphs.

Where possible, consider replacing text with visuals to represent your point. People remember images more than words.

A minimalist, black and white PowerPoint template

3. Be mindful of colors and fonts

No one wants their audience to leave with a headache after an hour of straining to read slides. We need to ensure that our presentation is easy to read for everyone – even for those in the nosebleed seats at the back! Think about the font you are using. Is it appropriate for the presentation? What about the font size? Can people at the back easily read? What about people with visual impairment? Ensure all text is at least 24pts.

When it comes to color, ensure all slides have good contrast. Dark backgrounds should have light font and vice versa.

4. Use animation sparingly

Animation can really liven up an otherwise flat presentation. However, it should be used thoughtfully and sparingly. Too much of the wrong type of animation with objects flying in and zooming around the screen, while fun, can look confusing and unprofessional.

Animation should be subtle. With every animation you add, ask yourself, "Is this going to enhance my presentation or distract from it?"

5. Engage your audience

When presenting to an audience, there is usually an awkward time before the presentation begins while the speaker waits for everyone to arrive. During this time, people may start scrolling on their phones or get distracted with work emails, and it can be hard to pull the audience back.

To avoid this issue, work to grab your audience's attention before the presentation even starts. Instead of just having the title slide on the screen, consider creating "kiosk slides." These are a series of slides that contain a combination of interesting things for the audience to look at or engage with. Maybe you have an interesting image? A funny quote or fun facts? Or maybe there is a question you want them to think about prior to the session?

Create these slides and have them automatically cycle round before the presentation starts.

A PowerPoint presentation for a whitepaper proposal.

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How to Reduce Powerpoint File Size

Last Updated: March 29, 2022

This article was co-authored by wikiHow staff writer, Jack Lloyd . Jack Lloyd is a Technology Writer and Editor for wikiHow. He has over two years of experience writing and editing technology-related articles. He is technology enthusiast and an English teacher. This article has been viewed 972,846 times. Learn more...

This wikiHow teaches you how to lower a PowerPoint presentation file's size by compressing its images on a Windows or Mac computer, or by clearing the editing data on a Windows computer. There is currently no option to delete the editing data of PowerPoint presentations on a Mac.

Compressing Images on Windows

Step 1 Double-click an image.

  • If your PowerPoint file isn't yet open, first open it by double-clicking it.
  • It doesn't matter which picture you double-click, since all of them will open the appropriate tab.

Step 2 Click Compress Pictures.

Compressing Images on Mac

Step 1 Click File.

Removing Edit Data on Windows

Step 1 Click the File tab.

Expert Q&A

  • Using JPEG files rather than other file formats will cut down on your presentation's overall size. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • When formulating a presentation, using the default plain backgrounds in your slides will make your file smaller than if you upload detailed backgrounds. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • If you can't get your PowerPoint file to shrink down enough to send it via email, you can upload it to a cloud service (e.g., Google Drive) and send an email with a link to the file instead. Your recipient will be able to download the file from Google Drive. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0

presentation ppt size

  • Reducing your images' quality will make a noticeable difference in your PowerPoint's overall quality. Thanks Helpful 1 Not Helpful 1

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About This Article

Jack Lloyd

1. Double-click an image. 2. Click Compress Pictures . 3. Remove the check mark from “Apply only to this picture.” 4. Select a lower DPI. 5. Click OK . 6. Click File . 7. Click Options . 8. Click Advanced . 9. Click Discard editing data . 10. Click OK and save the file. Did this summary help you? Yes No

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presentation ppt size

Reduce the file size of your PowerPoint presentations

If the file size of your presentation is too large, try the following tips to make it more manageable.

Compress pictures in your presentation

Select a picture in your document. The Picture Format tab appears.

On the Picture Format tab, in the Adjust group, select Compress Pictures .

Under Compression options , do any of the following:

Make sure that Apply only to this picture is not selected so that the changes you make here will apply to all pictures in the document.

Select Delete cropped areas of pictures . This option removes the cropped picture data but note that if you delete the cropped picture data, you won't be able to restore it.

Under Resolution , select Use default resolution .

Compress Pictures

Under Compression options , do either of the following:

Select Delete cropped areas of pictures . This option removes the cropped picture data but note that if you delete the cropped picture data, you won't be able to restore it.

Compress Pictures options

Delete image editing data and lower default resolution

By default, when you edit an image, the data from the original is retained (to ensure the image can be restored). Discarding it means that you can't restore the changes you make, but it will reduce your file size. Lowering the default resolution for images also reduces your overall file size.

Go to File > Options > Advanced .

Under Image Size and Quality , do the following:

Select Discard editing data . This option removes stored data that's used to restore the image to its original state after it's been edited. Note that if you discard editing data, you won't be able to restore the image after you edit it.

Make sure that Do not compress images in file is not selected.

Set the image size and quality

Reduce the character set of embedded fonts

To make your presentation more sharable with others who don't have the same fonts in their system, it's typical to embed the fonts you use. However, embedded fonts will increase your file size. To minimize the file increase, embed only those characters used in the presentation.

Go to File > Options > Save .

Embed fonts in the file

Note:  If you've used custom fonts and want others to edit the presentation, select Embed all characters .

Reduce the file size of your Excel spreadsheets

Reduce the file size of your Word documents

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PresentationPoint

Best Resolution For PowerPoint Presentations

Sep 30, 2015 | DataPoint , DataPoint Real-time Screens , How-To , iPoint

presentation ppt size

77 Comments

mike wild

I do not have inch on powerpoint, What would 13.333 x 7.5 be in metric?

admin

Mike, don’t worry. You can enter you number with the cm suffix too! The 13.333 in by 7.5 is the default slide size setting for a widescreen presentation in Inches.

Fayej Khan

Dear Admin,

Thanks for an awesome tutorial.

I am using windows computer and my office version is 2016. I have the following question please.

” Is it possible to setup a Powerpoint slide resolution in windows computer that will work perfectly on Macbook Pro Retina Display? If yes, How?”

Note: I am searching this solution for a long time. i think you can help me to get a solution regarding this.

Regards and Thanks

Thanks for the message. To set up that presentation for your Macbook, look what the resolution is. Maybe it is 2880 x 1800. When you have that, go to your PowerPoint, click Design and then Slide Size and choose Custom Slide size. There you see the width and height in inches or centimeters. Just enter here 2880 px and 1800 px and PowerPoint converts it automatically into the corresponding inches or centimeters.

lucky

I have been doing posters for years now and I always get a problem when I make my poster to be an A1 size,it never apear clear, it so not clear that you can’t see the picture clearly even the writing. How do I do my settings?

Kurt Dupont

Hi Lucky, I need some more info on your process. Are you changing the slide size to the dimension of the A1 size? So 59.4cm x 84.1 cm or 23.4″ by 33.1″? I guess you did that already. How to you see it then that the picture is not clear? Are you insert pictures on your slide? Is the slide unclear on your screen? Or maybe, is a print-out or save-as-picture not clear? Please let me know. Maybe attached a sample.

Ann Greenwood

My version of PowerPoint does not allow me to insert a custom setting of 1080px X 1920px. However it does allow a ratio of 16:9 in portait which automatically converts the size settings to 14:29cm width and 25.4cm height. Is this the same as 1080px X 1920px?

Thanks for your help!

Hi Ann, it all sounds correct. You can enter your dimensions as 1080px and 1920px. But indeed, the pixel values are automatically translated into cm or inches. That is normal. The new values fully correspond to your chosen px values.

Sally Antonino

Thanks for your Power Point How To! Unfortunately I lack a lot of knowledge on this subject, but am interested in learning how to create a better quality, higher resolution jpeg on PP. I often create and send flyers by email, or post them in Facebook. When I do so the text and pictures are somewhat blurry. I assume they are automatically compressed and therefore lose quality. Of course I know they can’t be too large for either of these mediums. I don’t know much about width and height or resolution. Any direction you can give me as to how best to determine that, and how to turn out a higher quality flyer would be very much appreciated. Thanks Sally

Admin

Hi Sally, I assume that you are using PPT 2016. In PowerPoint, click File, Options, Advanced. Then at the group ‘Image Size and Quality’, change the ‘Default resolution’ option. I always set this to ‘High fidelity’ for the best results.

That should do the trick!

Frank Harwood

I have PP 2016. A projector with native res of 1024 x 768. My screen is a 4:3 (6′ X 8′) and having trouble filling the screen. Should I tic the “Best scale for slide show” box and input 1024 x 768? How about using “Play full screen” under the video Playback tab. It’s all confusing.

Hi Frank, Your resolution of 1024 x 768 is a perfect match with your screen, since that is 4:3 too. According to this info here, I would say that the result is a full screen image. Video playback tab: no impact on your slide show page setting. Is for videos only. But have you set you slide design setting to 4:3 too? See Design, Slide Size. Is that 4:3?

Yes, I have slide size set to 4:3 (Slide still not filling the screen. Here are my specs: Projection screen size: 8′ x 6′ (4:3 ratio) Shows a 10″ X 7.5″ slide size. Projector has a native resolution of 1024 X 768 I should make the slide size setting 4:3 and leave default size or put in pixel sizes for height/width? That is 1024 px X 768 px?

What should my laptop display resolution be set to?

At 4:3 the slides fit the screen but the inserted videos do not fit screen–not sure what is causing that. Should “Play Full Screen” be checked?

When “Best scale for slide show is selected” a resolution is requested. (?) The default is showing 640×480)

At what point in the process do I bring in my slide show template? After all settings have been completed?

Sorry about the ton of questions Admin, there are so many settings it boggles the mind. Thanks Frank

Frank, since your projector is 4:3, then you should choose 4:3 on your slide design as well. If you want, you can always enter the pixel value, there whee you see the inches values. Just type in your e.g. 1024 px (with px!) and it will be converted to inches again. Could be a good test to try.

Best is to open your template first, and then apply the screen and slide design settings.

Frank Harwoos

Hi Admin, Thanks for the suggestions.

When I select 4:3 for the 6′ x 8′ projection screen, there are no options to input H & W but I selected “Custom” and input 1024 px in width box and 768 in height. When I exited then re-entered “custom” the box showed 10.667 in and 8.0 in. (PowerPoint 2016).

Is placing the projector’s native res (1024 X 768) in the “Slide Size” box the only location in PP that the res is entered? (I see all kinds of slide dimensions in different places in PP.)

Thanks again, Frank

Thanks is correct. The px values that you can enter manually, are automatically converted into inches or centimetres, based on your regional settings. The only place where you should set/change the presentation slide design, is at (for ppt 2016) Design tab, Slide Size, Custom Slide Size. Maybe try with a new and clean presentation first!

Thanks Mr. Admin, you have been great. Saying that, nothing is working so I’m starting to think my new HDMI over Cat 6 cable that I got from Amazon might be the culprit. It uses two powered baluns but the cable itself was cheap.

For example, when I change the laptop display setting to match the projector’s, 1024×768 I lose the projector image entirely. I don’t get it back until I go back up to several higher re settings. AND, none of the slide sizes change the output to any degree at all. (Very frustrating.)

Frank, I understand that this is very frustrating for you. But I would suggest to bring down the resolution to 800×600 pixels. That is the most standard and lowest resolution that every device should be able to handle. Try that first. Secondly, try to use a VGA cable maybe, to check out your new HDMI cable (or another HDMI cable that you borrow somewhere).

And maybe try your chance at a PowerPoint forum or at other resources where more PowerPoint experts are watching. They might have the experience that you need here. Check out e.g. http://www.msofficeforums.com/powerpoint/ and https://support.office.com/en-us/article/Connect-with-other-PowerPoint-users-ce0fd093-41c0-406c-92b8-65603b89aa6e

Frank

Many thanks Admin, I’ll try those resources you suggested.

deborah stambaugh

Hi Admin – we have a ppt template that by itself is over 5MB and is causing problems when we start to add additional pages we quickly get up to 20-40MB! We mainly present on a range from computer screen to normal boardroom sized screens. We have 2 solutions we’re looking into and would appreciate your expertise. 1) reduce all of the images in the master to 96 dpi, 2) remove all images in the master, only have templates, and then have separate files that can be inserted that contain images, etc. Any recommendations? Thoughts?

Hi Deborah, Shrinking your images before you insert them, is a good option. But, even when they are inserted already, you can compress the images on your slides, and thus, reduce the total size of the presentation. To do this, select your image, and go to the Picture Tools, Format tab. Click the Compress Pictures button. Now you get the option to compress the images to a given resolution, and to crop the pictures.

Normally a presentation of 20-40MB should not give you problems. What are the problems that you are experiencing then? Slow starting?

Kathy

Hello — I have a PowerPoint presentation with slides that are set up as 10in x 7.5in (960 pixels x 720 pixels). If my .jpg images are set up as 96 pixels/inch, is that a high enough resolution? There will be 210 slides in the presentation, and each slide will have one .jpg that fills the screen. I am creating each slide first in InDesign (so that I have full design control over image/text) and exporting it as a .jpg file. I will not be adding anything else to the slide in PowerPoint (no additional text or images).

Thank you, Kathy

Hi Kathy, So your real question is, is a resolution of 96 pixels/inch enough for my presentation. First of all, 210 slides in one presentation is a lot. So, I guess you are creating some kind of brochure or business reporting, and not a sales presentation. So, with this number of slides, you will face probably a larger file. Using 96 px/in will keep your file size to a minimum. That’s for sure.

Important is: what is your priority? Small file size for easy distribution? Then you are fine already with this small resolution. But, if you want to use this presentation as an advertising or promotion presentation with your company’s products, then you should look at the resolution of your display device. When you are using a large 4K television screen (this is 4096 x 2160 px) for this, then of course this resolution of 960 x 720 pixels in total, is way too low. This would mean, that one pixel of your image would be stretched out and serve 4 pixels on your television. That results in an unsharp image on the TV.

So, the resolution set for your images, is not that important. You need to know the resolution of your display device (computer or projector/television) and the purpose of your presentation. Based on that info, you can make decisions on the image resolution, before importing them into PowerPoint.

But maybe a tip, or what I would do. Export the images from InDesign, in the highest resolution possible. Use them in PowerPoint. It will result in a large file, but you will have the maximum of information or details on your slides. Next step is to make a copy of the presentation and then you select your first picture, go to Picture Tools, Format tab, Compress Pictures. There you will have the option to compress the image to a lower resolution (for this or all images of the presentation). Save the presentation and evaluate it size or quality (whatever is your priority).

Hope this helps!

This is very helpful — thank you for all of the information and suggestions. It will help my workflow greatly. Thanks again.

David

Hi Do you have any particular advice on creating a PP presentation for a cinema screen. The cinema has specified 1990px x 1080px. Do you have any other advice?

Sure, at the boxes where you typically enter your values in inches or centimeters, just enter there the values with ‘px’ as suffix. So type in: 1990px and it will be translated automatically into inches or centimeters (according to your regional settings). That should help you.

Paul2017

Thanks for the article!

I have one question, I am creating a presentation that will be projected at a film theater and will include a variety of images. I want it to have the best possible quality. Is there something specific that I should do if it will be projecting at such a large size? Do I have to figure out the size of the projection in order to design something accordingly?

Thanks again

Hi Paul, thanks for your message.

Well, let me try to help you. The resolution of the presentation that you are designing is probably not relevant since you are probably using a projector on a wall. When presenting on a television screen, then you must respect the aspect ratio of your presentation and your television. More is explained here: https://presentationpoint.com/blog/powerpoint-aspect-ratio/ . But, that is not relevant when you are projecting on a e.g. white wall. Then you are not restricted at all, with regards to the aspect ratio.

More important is the possible loss in quality of your images. You might want to work with high resolution images, but by default, PowerPoint is compressing the images to a much lower resolution! That you don’t want to happen with a professional and largely projected presentation. Force PowerPoint to not compress your images. Set this already before you start adding images and definitely before your first save of the presentation. More info at https://presentationpoint.com/blog/powerpoint-compress-images/

Good luck with your event.

James M Wadkins

Whatis the real, true, actual maximum width in pixels for powerpoint 2016? I not talking about the scale up to fit the gpu (video card) but the actual physical pixel width limit. In 2010I was always told it was 4000 pixels. I do working with really wide screens in the video world. And by wide screen, I am talking 4096×4=16,384 pixels wide is a small canvas for us.

Microsoft will not generally answer this question and I have asked them this as microsoft shows like ignite 2017. Their responce is we base things on the printed world.

Good question James! Let’s play with it. PowerPoint 2016 (on Win platform) allows you to enter a custom slide design of 56″ width and 56″ height. Those are the maximum values that it allows. When you set a width in pixels, e.g. you enter 100px as value there, then that is translated into 1.042″. You know that you can enter px values in PowerPoint, right? So 100 pixels = 1.042″. This is means that the maximum pixel size of a PowerPoint presentation is limited to 5835 x 5835 pixels. 5835 pixels is the highest resolution that you can go. You can go higher, but you are losing quality. Hope that answers your question!

Jerry Lee

I send my customers PowerPoint files with mockup images of UI designs. I often receive comments saying the designs are either too small or too large, but I discovered this is largely because they use different devices with different dimensions/resolutions to review the mockups. Is there a way I can “force” images onscreen to stay fixed (let’s say at 4.2″x6.8″) regardless of what device they use?

Judy Hanks

I am preparing a photography dense Power Point presentation on a Mac that serves informational needs to both regional public offices and local mayors. I understand that these clients will be using PC computers. My online research warns the Mac lettering fonts may distort on PC oriented screens. To solve this issue, a suggestion was to take a image of a page’s entire the layout of images and text. How is that done successfully? Is a full size screen shot of a computer screen going to work? I am thinking that is not. So how do I get a good page image resolution? What file resolution am I after? 300dpi, 400dpi? It also warns of the sizes of each image done in this manner would be larger than if I had it done in PC’s Power Point. How much larger? What are the variables I need to understand?

Hi Judy, I would not export your nice presentation as (high-res) images between your Mac and PC users just for that. Why don’t you use safe fonts? A safe font is a font that can be used (normally without problems) on PC and Mac. There is a nice article that I found about this matter at https://www.indezine.com/products/powerpoint/learn/textandfonts/safe-fonts.html . Hope that helps!

Sarah

I created a show at a custom size (10.5×8) and saved the slides as images. When I went to insert the images into a slideshow with the same dimensions as backgrounds, they were super fuzzy. Is there a way to fix this?

Thanks! Sarah

Hi Sarah, I think that you need to read and apply this article! https://presentationpoint.com/blog/powerpoint-low-resolution-pictures/

Jennifer

Is a 220 ppi good enough to have a crisp high quality presentation on a 16:9 projector with a resolution of 1,536 pixels x 960 pixels? Thank you!

Oh yes. 220 is still a very good quality! It will be looking much better already with this change!

Jose Andres Borilla

What is the resolution settings of powerpoint JPG for 43″ LED TV?

Dear Jose, thanks for your question. At the stage, it is not possible for me to say that you have to use a resolution of x by y, because it depends on 2 things: a) what is the maximum display resolution that you can use on your television. For this info, check out the technical specifications of your brand/model. b) and more important: what is the maximum resolution or the current resolution of the computer that you want to connect to the screen?

Note that maybe your screen can handle a 4K resolution of 3840 by 2160 pixels, but your computer can handle only 1920 by 1080 pixels. In that case you best set up your presentation for 1920 by 1080 pixels, because that is the highest resolution that your computer can generate and send to your screen.

But on the other side, 3840 by 2160 is a ratio of 16:9 and 16:9 is definitely the ratio that is used on all modern televisions. So I would suggest to use 3840 by 2160, aka 4K, because that would fit on every 16:9 screen, even if the resolution is lower (whenever it is 16:9). So use and design in 4K and the output will be ok.

All clear? Success with your setup.

Phil

Dear Admin, thank you for the tutorial on the screen resolution. Please, I use windows 2010 and I can’t locate where to change the slide size like you illustrated using windows 2013. My presentation on my laptops come out so tiny and faint on the Flat Screen during my presentation. My audience can’t read what is on the screen. I need your help in this regard. Thank you. Phil.

Hi Phil, Have a look at this great article by Ellen Finkelstein where you see instructions and screenshots for 2010 specifically. https://www.ellenfinkelstein.com/pptblog/how-to-create-a-poster-in-powerpoint-2007-powerpoint-2010/ Does that help?

Ken Molay

Sorry, gang… You included a lot of good information and suggestions here, but you never gave the correct answer. The Best Resolution for PowerPoint Presentations is:

“I resolve to use fewer text bullet points on my slides!”

Marnie

Hello! I am working a Widescreen HD project– the default slide size is 13.333 x 7.5 in. When I insert the specifications of 1920 x 1080 px, the slide size reduces to 9.999 x 5.624 in. The slide size is *smaller*– it doesn’t seem logical that a smaller slide size would have increased projected resolution. What am I missing?

That sounds a bit low yes. AFAIK this value is calculated based on your current DPI settings. Could this be low too? In order to build e.g. a higher resolution presentation, I would double here your values in inches. The bigger, the better. It will always be reduced when too big. But starting small is, as you expected, not ideal.

Valentine

Thank you so much for this great post. I want to create how-to-presentations and how-to-videos for internal teaching purposes at my company. First, I plan to create PowerPoint presentations with each >50-100 slides, lots of pictures and animations, afterwards I want to use the presentations as basis to produce the videos. The company I am working for deploys 4k widescreen TVs. Most of the pictures at our disposal are in 1920 x 1080 px format or lower.

First question: Above you mentioned “So I would suggest to use 3840 by 2160, aka 4K, because that would fit on every 16:9 screen, even if the resolution is lower”. I am not sure if I understood you correctly. Would it be of any benefit to me to use a 4K PowerPoint resolution, as you suggested, even if our pictures are of lower quality? If yes, why?

Second question: In order to produce the videos which of the two options would be better according to your experience? To use (a) the PowerPoint video feature or (b) to use a screen recorder (e.g. obs) to record my presentations as video? (Please keep in mind there are many animations which have to be executed manually in real time)

Third question: Which resolution should I use to produce a video given my company uses 4K TVs? (Full HD or 4K, given that our pictures are of lower quality than 4K)?

Sorry for the many questions I need your help. Thank you!

Thank you so much for your great article. I hope you can help me.

I would like to create high quality how-to-presentations and how-to-videos (both with many slides, pictures, animations and verbal comments) for internal education purposes at the company I am working for. We deploy 4k widescreen TVs. The format of the pictures at our disposal is 1920 x 1080 px or lower. First, I want to create the presentations, afterwards I want to use them as basis for the videos.

Above you mentioned “So I would suggest to use 3840 by 2160, aka 4K, because that would fit on every 16:9 screen, even if the resolution is lower”. I am not sure if I understood you correctly. Would it be of any benefit to me to make 4K PowerPoint presentations even if our pictures are 1920 x 1080 px or lower? If yes, why?

In order to create the videos which of the two options would you prefer according to your experience? (A) to use the PowerPoint video feature to create the videos? (I heard that PowerPoint is now able to do 4k videos) or (B) to use a screen recorder (e.g. OBS)? (Please keep in mind the format of our pictures; Also the many animations & verbal comments which I need to record in the video in real-time).

Would you also recommend to produce 4k videos instead of HD videos (1920 x 1080 px) given our picture quality?

I already finished a couple of presentations but they are in the format 4:3. Thanks to your article I understood that I have to switch the format to 16:9. When I attempt to set the settings for a new presentation to 16:9 (1920 x 1080 px) I get a PowerPoint-question asking me if I want to maximize the content or if I want to scale it down. Which of the two options do I have to take?

Your help would be very much appreciated. Thank you!

First question: I would still use 4K resolution. The higher the better. Even when your pictures are not directly in 4K, then still you can have the other shapes like texts etc in very high quality. Second question: ‘Animations that have to be executed manually’: that is conflicting with videos. Once it is a video, you have no manual options unless you would pause or start new videos. When it is manual advancing and animations (on click), then PowerPoint remains the best option. Not? Third question: Is related to the first one and I would give the same answer. I would produce and render at 4K.

This message is more or less identical to your first request. Overall I would suggest using 4K slide size. Maybe your images are not directly 4K, all the rest can be displayed in better quality. So when your TV output is 4K, then design in 4K for the best results.

Thanks so much for your great help! Since I have already completed a few presentations I was wondering whether I have to completely remake them. The presentations where saved in 220ppi mode (PowerPoint-Version 2016). My goal is to have a very high presentation quality (I guess high-fidelity will do) and a 4k resolution (I changed the settings after reading your post accordingly). Because of the standard PowerPoint settings of 220ppi I have to replace the pictures, this I understood. But what about the PowerPoint shapes like arrows etc? Are they automatically in high quality when I change the settings in the existing (old) presentations from e.g. 220ppi to high-fidelity or do the shapes still keep their 220ppi?

What would be the best solution? a) To simply replace my pictures (220ppi) in the current presentations. In case the shapes adapt automatically from 220ppi to high-fidelity this option would be preferred. b) To start a new presentation from scratch with the setting of high fidelity. I still have to replace the pictures but could I just copy the shapes from the existing (old) presentations into the new presentation? (Of course only good if the shapes would get changed from 220ppi to high-fidelity via the copying-process) c) To start a new presentation from scratch having to add new pictures and make new shapes?

Sorry for the delay due to the Christmas period. Correct. First make sure to use high-res images and make sure that PowerPoint is not compressing them by default when you save the presentation.

You can perfectly change the slide design to 220 and everything will be adjusted. That is the advantage of PowerPoint. Then ‘calculation’ is done when you run the slideshow, so your ‘low-res-shapes’ will become ‘high-res-shapes’ automatically. Easy, not?

Mike

Quick Question… Why using 4k slides when the text and shape are vector, only images should be High-res so what is the main advantage of using the 4k and not the full hd?

Hi Mike, Good question. Basically you are right. Texts and other shapes are saved as vectors, so that makes no real sense. Images and videos need to be in high resolution, without having the risk that they are shrunk. Maybe it is a personal thing, but when you are using high res images and high quality on a small resolution screen like 800×600 pixels, and when you are applying fine and precise animations to your slides, then you want to design and test the results on the more-or-less same quality. It is absolutely not mandatory, but a Ferrari is preferably tested on the highway or on a test track:-).

Brent Wolfberg

I appreciate your article and I have a question on avoiding image distortion in ppt.

I am trying to take a ppt presentation that had originally started in 2007 and continued to work omn in ppt 2016. According to my settings it shows under properties as 35 mm slide format.

I used ppt to createsome of the more recent images, i.e. prototype designs at various different perspective, because I found it easier than using photoshop.

When I decided to migrate certain images and slides from ppt 2016, into a higher resolution (1920×1080, per your article) the images were grossly distorted to beyond recognizable, and any repair.

I tried both “made images fit the slide,” as well as the “maximize options.” in setting up the 1920 x 1080 without success.

The results were quite a mess, either way.

Before you comment I want to let you know that several images were worked on one slide so that I could demonstrate different “product variations,” and I recall that I often had to work at 350 to 400x zoom in creating them on that single slide. I thought I could work on them and then copy and paste them into seperate slides as needed. That actual slide of images took about 3 weeks+ to complete.

The presentation will be to investors and VCs. What is the best way to avoid gross distortion, and best resolution as I start to transfer images over to ppt in 1920×1080? Help!!!

Do I need to utilize any program or save images in any different format, (jpeg,tiff/ etc?) to convert things and then import the images into the higher res presentation??? Or am I competely unfortunate to have these critical images that won’t scale up or work????

Hi Brent, Have you also read these articles? https://presentationpoint.com/blog/convert-powerpoint-to-jpeg/ https://presentationpoint.com/blog/powerpoint-compress-images/ When this is not helping either, send in a trouble ticket on our website with a one-slide-one-picture sample.

Brent A Wolfberg

Will do. Thanks so much for the prompt response. I will read those articles later today.

Naved Potrick

Hi, if the ppt is made in the ratio of 16:9 And if we r displaying it on the led wall of 8/6 ft will the display be full or will it look cinema scope

Well, on an 8/6 ft wall, it will have cinema-style with black borders for sure. A shame that not all pixels are used of your expensive LED wall. To fill your 8/6 ft LED wall, please redesign your presentation as a 4:3 ratio presentation. All clear?

Dell Meredith

I have a couple of questions I’m hoping you can help me with but first I’ll give you the details. I am creating a powerpoint presentation for a funeral. I started out with 600 dpi images but the PP file quickly got huge (200MB). I optimized all my images to 96 dpi and they are all at least 2000 pixels wide or high. That optimization has currently taken the Powerpoint file size down to 20 MB. There are many, many pics in this presentation. At 20MB optimized I am only half done. It will likely end up with around 100 pics so I think it is wise to optimize all these images because I have also read that a huge powerpoint file will cause the presentation to drag. The church where this will be presented uses a projector and it projects onto a 12′ x 12′ screen. I am not in the city where the funeral is being held so I can’t test to see what this looks like and won’t be there until the day of the funeral. I have a surface pro tablet that I’ll use to plug into the projector. I spoke to the church caretaker who helps to set this up and he said that, without knowing all the technical details, that what seems to have worked best for people is for them to plug their laptop directly into the projector with an HDMI cable and project it onto the screen. I have a big screen tv that I plugged my tablet into and played the presentation and it looked as good on the large tv screen as it did on my tablet.

My questions/concerns are: Will the projector just project what is on the tablet screen and it will look as good on the big projector screen as it does on the tablet or big screen? (when being projected is dpi of the source relevant. My concern is can I projector a large version of the presentation and still preserve nice detail or do I project it much smaller than the available screen dimensions of 12′ x 12′?

I just hoping to project a large version with ice detail and don’t want to arrive to set it up and not have it display nicely.

Sorry for the long story but would really appreciate your opinion.

Dear Dell, presentations are fun, funerals are not at all. My condolences with your loss! I was in the same situation as you earlier this year. Well, if you would use your own computer and connect it to the projector, then the file size of the PowerPoint is not that relevant anymore. Right? Everything starts with the resolution of the projector. Note that most projectors use a lower resolution than the televisions and computer screens that are sold nowadays. Most likely the projector can handle the size of HD (High Definition), 1920 x 1080 pixels. So your idea to use images of 2000 pixels is an excellent choice and personally, I would continue to work on 1920 or 2000 pixels. That is a safe choice for a good resolution!

But, note that when the tablet has a lower resolution than the projector, then most likely the output on the projector will not be better than what the tablet can handle (its video graphics card). So use a laptop or tablet with at least the HD resolution and then you are safe. To be completely safe, it is best to take your laptop or tablet with the original PowerPoint file on it. Using your own computer is also better when you have used special (not common) fonts. Otherwise, you have to install or embed the fonts you used. Just as a backup, I would take with me: the PowerPoint file on a memory stick, but also render the PowerPoint as video (MP4). Then you are completely independent of what software is installed (or not) on a potential foreign computer.

All clear? Got luck with your important job at the funeral!

Andreas Christensen

So I am creating this powerpoint presentation and I’m losing my hair over the fact that all sizes are in cm. I understand that I can simply enter my wanted size in pixels, and powerpoint will then convert this to cm. Is there a way to make pixels the default measurement? It would simply make one’s workflow so much easier. Thanks in advance!

Hi Andreas, I would love to work in pixels too, but currently, PowerPoint is only working in inches or centimeters. You can upvote this feature request here: https://powerpoint.uservoice.com/forums/288949-powerpoint-for-windows-desktop-application/suggestions/19595893-change-units-from-inches-to-pixels

christian warren ganser

Thanks for such an informative article. I was struggling to create a photographic presentation for a powerpoint presentation and you have saved me so much time!

Great to read that we could help you out with this information!

Trupti

Hi i need help.. I m preparing certificates in ppt. But when I’m sharing to other person somewhere changes happening. Same file on my side is correct but other side it is not correct in size wise… Is it happening because of computer resolution? Kindly let me know why it is happening?

How do you see that? Are you looking at the slide design settings? Are they modified?

I saw directly in my coullegue’s computer. Without modification same file when she sent that was right and same file when i sent to same person he said that was not right It’s screwed as he always complained before in terms of dimensions (A4 stretched to wide-screen). Why this is happening? Please let me know.. It’s important for me

Sorry but I think you can better explain your problem here at https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/newthread . There are some better specialists and experienced people looking into individual problems. OK?

Alex

Thank you for an excellent article! I have been scouring the internet for this information and I have found your guide extremely useful. It’s a testimony to you that people are still adding comments some 5 years after you wrote this article!

I have a question if I may. I am using PowerPoint to create 1 minute animated infographics (in video form). The targeted output for the final videos needs to be 1280px by 644px (which is fine). Here’s my question: Would I get better quality videos if I set my slide size in PowerPoint to HD 1920px by 1080px for the design and then exported to video using the PowerPoint export function set at 1920px by 1080px and THEN resized the final video to 1280px x 644px using software like Handbrake?

Or should I simply set my PowerPoint slides size for the design to the final desired output of 1280px by 644px?

I’d be really grateful for any help/advice you can offer as I’m really not sure which way to go!

Many thanks

Hi Alex, thanks for commenting. I love when people are using PowerPoint for other purposes than just 16:9 slides! Personally I would design on the same size as you would output the video! Why? The risk of using small font sizes, will not be obvious when you are designing at 2x. So at 2x, your text might be readable, while it is too small on the normal size. So just be careful with that, because you might forget to check at 1x. On the other hand, when you suspect that maybe next year, you need a larger video because the output screen got bigger or so, then for that reason, I would suggest to design now already at 2x, and resize the video afterwards. Hope this helps.

Thank you so much for replying!

Sujith

Hi,how can I get the 1920×1080 resolution ,windows 10? I followed the described way,but unit is ‘inch’ and it is not changing.I can’t type px inside the box

You can type in the pixel value with px behind your number, and that is then translated into the corresponding cm or inch value. Try it, it works.

Nate

If a powerpoint resolution is greater than the screen it is being displayed on, will that screen not be able to display it?

Wondering if there is any reason not to always go with a larger resolution?

Thanks! Nate

Yes sure, that should not cause any problem. PowerPoint will adjust itself automatically based on the screen resolution, lower or higher.

Ravi

Hello Admin, I have to run my ppt on a big LED Panel wall whose size is W: 34 ft and H: 12 ft and I don’t want any black bars when running my ppt. Which ratio size will be apt for my PPT? 16:9 or any other?

You don’t want to black bars? Easy. Go to Design, Slide Size, and choose custom slide size. 34 foot or 408 inches is too large for PowerPoint. The highest value you can enter in PowerPoint is 56″ horizontally and vertically. When you have 34 x 12 ft, which is 408 x 144 inches, then this is too high for PowerPoint (bigger than 56″). Your screen ratio is then 17×6. So the maximum is 56″ in width, so you can set your height to 19.766″ (so that you have 17:6) at the PowerPoint custom slide size dimensions. OK?

I would love to see real-time data on that size of screen. Are you going to use our DataPoint plugin there?

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Compress PPT Presentations Online

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May 8, 2023 by Hung Nguyen

Learn how to reduce the size of your PPT files significantly, at no cost, using Smallpdf. No watermark, no registration, and no installation.

We’ve come across many large PPT files in our years of compressing digital documents, from sales pitches to lecture material and business proposals. Usually, the need to reduce the size of these files comes from having to share them via email, where the file size cap is around 20 MB. Compressing PowerPoint files also comes in handy to save storage space, be it on your local computer or an otherwise pricey cloud service such as Dropbox. You can use our online compress tool to shrink your PPT down significantly and thus make your life easier and save some money.

How to Compress a PPT File for Free

Upload your ppt to the compress tool ., choose “basic compression.”, click on “export as” and choose powerpoint..

Convert, compress, and download your PPT using Smallpdf

You can get started with compressing your PowerPoint presentation for free right away. You don’t need a Smallpdf account—just go to the tool and drop your file in!

Will the Document’s Formatting Remain the Same?

We aim to maintain the layout and quality of your document as close to the original PPT as possible. We actually first turn your PowerPoint into a PDF document; then, our compressor looks for repeating patterns in the data and replaces them with unique identifiers. This is actually what makes your file smaller. This process doesn’t touch attributes like fonts and the layout of your PPT, so they should stay just as they are.

Smallpdf caters to millions of users every month and uses the most reliable software on the internet to convert, edit, and compress files. So, you can trust that we’ll produce only the absolute best conversion quality.

There are extra measures that you can take to be absolutely sure that the final content resembles its original form. You can “embed” the fonts of the text in your PowerPoint presentation. You’ll find this option under “Preferences” in PowerPoint. Doing this will ensure that the fonts remain the same, even when we don’t have the same ones on our servers.

You can repeat the above process for each file if you need to compress multiple PowerPoint files or want to compress images and other formats. Smallpdf accepts all Microsoft Office files and JPG images. If you go Pro, you can also compress files in batches, and we’ll conveniently store them in a zip file for you. Why not sign up for a 7-day free Pro trial before fully committing?

And that’s all there is to it! Enjoy compressing your PPT and be sure to explore the many other tools we offer.

Hurray for smaller presentations!

Hung Nguyen

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Table of Contents

Presentation sizes standard, presentation sizes for digital, presentation sizes for print, presentation sizes for business, presentation sizes for microsoft powerpoint, presentation sizes for google slides, presentation sizes for apple keynote, presentation sizes faqs, graphic design, presentation sizes.

Presentations may not look as pleasant as how you design them with pictures, animations, videos, and other graphic designs without considering the proper sizes. Often measured in either fullscreen or widescreen aspect ratios, the standard presentation sizes are actually categorized according to the number of content slides per presentation.

presentation ppt size

Short Presentation Size

Standard presentation size, long presentation size, what is the golden rule of powerpoint presentations, what is the standard size of a presentation, what are the best presentation sizes in pixels, what is the 5-5-5 rule for presentations, what are the two top aspect ratios of ms powerpoint, what are the 7cs of a presentation, what is the 16:9 powerpoint slide size in inches and centimeters, what is the 4:3 powerpoint slide size in pixels and inches, what are the 4ps of a presentation in public speaking, what is the 80/20 rule in a presentation, what is the 4 × 4 rule in presentations, more in graphic design, esport gaming presentation template, project presentation template, simple chart presentation template, architecture infographic presentation template, health presentation template, exploring the earth presentation template, electric bike campaign presentation template, graduation presentation template, marketing agency presentation template, fashion designer portfolio presentation template.

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How to Embed a Video in PowerPoint

presentation ppt size

Lee Stanton Lee Stanton is a versatile writer with a concentration on the software landscape, covering both mobile and desktop applications as well as online technologies. Read more February 9, 2024

Adding videos to your PowerPoint can elevate your presentation to another level altogether. But how do you embed a video in a PowerPoint slide? There are many ways to do this, all of which are relatively straightforward.

How to Embed a Video in PowerPoint

This guide will explain how to embed a video from your PC, YouTube, or the Internet into your PowerPoint presentation.

Embedding a Video From Your PC Into PowerPoint

You don’t need an internet connection to embed a video saved locally on your PC into PowerPoint. One advantage of using local content is that it ensures your video will always play optimally, with or without Wi-Fi.

However, note that you can only insert videos in PowerPoint from its PC app. The content you want to add must also be in one of the standard video formats .

  • Open your PowerPoint presentation.
  • Go to the slide you’d like to embed the video in.

Clicking the Insert button from the menu bar in Microsoft PowerPoint

  • Find and select the video on your PC.
  • Resize your video if needed.

Pressing the Play button on the video in Microsoft PowerPoint

Using the Playback section, you can watch it from start to finish to ensure it’s correctly embedded. Additionally, you can run the presentation, go to the slide that has a video, and check everything.

Embedding a Stock Video Into PowerPoint

You can pick one from Microsoft’s repository if you need to insert royalty-free video clips directly into a PowerPoint presentation.

  • Open your PowerPoint presentation .
  • Go to the correct slide on which you’d like to insert your YouTube video.

Choosing Insert from the menu bar in Microsoft PowerPoint

  • Resize the video to your desired dimensions and play it to ensure it’s working properly.

Embedding a YouTube Video Into PowerPoint

You can embed a video from YouTube or any other major platform on the internet into your PowerPoint presentation as well. The benefit of this method is that you don’t need to save the video locally on your PC. 

But there are a few cons as well. If you don’t have access to the internet when presenting, your video won’t play. Furthermore, YouTube chooses the cover image that will appear as a presentation on your video slide.

If you love aesthetics or would prefer to customize your entire presentation, keep these limitations in mind.

  • Select Insert from the menu toolbar.

Choosing Online Video from the Insert Video From menu in Microsoft PowerPoint

  • Paste the URL directed to your YouTube video on the blank text bar that pops up.

Clicking the Insert button of the Embed window in Microsoft PowerPoint

  • Resize your YouTube video and ensure it’s positioned where you want. You can’t change the cover image.

Clicking the Play button on the video in Microsoft PowerPoint

Note that the process is similar if you want to embed videos from X or any other online platform.

What Kind of Videos Can You Insert Into PowerPoint?

Before embedding PowerPoint videos, you should take note of the following criteria:

Video Format

You will find embedding MP4 videos with H.264 codec easy into PowerPoint. Some formats that use this codec are .mp4, .m4v, and .mov. They are recommended because they offer good compatibility and compression. However, many common video formats will work, some of which include:

  • Movie (.mpeg, .mpg)
  • Windows Video (.wmv, .asf)

Maximum Video Size

Officially, there is no limit; however, smaller videos are more adaptable and will generally offer a smoother experience. As much as possible, you may want to keep them under 50-100MB for easy playback and portability. You may experience crashes, lag, and file size issues with large videos.

Recommended Resolution

Ideally, you should embed 1080p videos (1920 x 1080 pixels) into your PowerPoint presentation. This offers excellent quality without excessively increasing the file size.

When possible, avoid higher resolutions like 4K since they may not play smoothly on every device and may cause strain in performance.

You may use lower resolutions like 720p for smaller presentations, but these may not offer the best viewing experience, especially if you are presenting on larger screens. But the low-resolution video will work when you have to present the PowerPoint over a Google Meet call .

Embedding Success

Embedding videos in your PowerPoint presentation is a great way to liven it up. Whether you use a video you’ve created or one from the internet, it’s important to consider the pros and cons of each method.

If you don’t have an internet connection, embedding a video from the internet or YouTube will result in an unsuccessful presentation, as your video won’t play. To avoid any hassle, it’s advisable to use the methods best suited to your circumstances.

Do I need an internet connection to embed videos in PowerPoint?

You don’t need an internet connection to embed a downloaded video in PowerPoint. However, you require an internet connection and a web version of PowerPoint to embed online videos.

What should I do if PowerPoint cannot insert my video?

If you cannot embed your video into PowerPoint, it might be that it isn’t converted to the recommended format. When embedding videos into PowerPoint, it’s best to use mp4 files that have H.264 encoded into them. This is the best-recommended compatibility for PowerPoint in Windows and Mac.

Why aren’t my PowerPoint videos playing on a secondary monitor?

If you’re experiencing this problem, you can try to disable one of two options. You can either Disable Hardware Graphics Acceleration or Disable Slide Show hardware graphics acceleration . You can find both these options in the Display tab under File and Advanced options .

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IMAGES

  1. PowerPoint Slide Size

    presentation ppt size

  2. Choosing a Presentation Size

    presentation ppt size

  3. what is a powerpoint slide size

    presentation ppt size

  4. How to Change the Slide Size in Microsoft PowerPoint

    presentation ppt size

  5. PowerPoint Slide Size

    presentation ppt size

  6. What Are the Right Dimensions (Size) for Your PowerPoint PPT Slides?

    presentation ppt size

VIDEO

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  4. PowerPoint animation 5 steps infographic slide design |PowerPoint Presentation

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  6. Shrinking the size of a PowerPoint presentation to email

COMMENTS

  1. Reduce the file size of your PowerPoint presentations

    Go to File > Options > Save. Under Preserve fidelity when sharing this presentation, select Embed fonts in the file, and then select Embed only the characters used in the presentation. Note: If you've used custom fonts and want others to edit the presentation, select Embed all characters. See Also Reduce the file size of your Excel spreadsheets

  2. What Are the Right Dimensions (Size) for Your PowerPoint PPT Slides

    Click on the Design tab on PowerPoint's ribbon. The available options will change on the ribbon. Find the Customize section on the ribbon and click on the Slide Size icon. A drop-down menu opens with several options. Click on Custom Slide Size to open the Slide size menu and change your presentation's dimensions.

  3. Change the size of your slides

    Basic steps To change the slide size: Select the Design tab of the toolbar ribbon. Select Slide Size near the far right end of the toolbar. Select Standard (4:3 aspect ratio) or Widescreen (16:9) or Custom Slide Size.

  4. How to change the PowerPoint Slide Size: All you need to know

    If you can't see the button, press Customize to reveal it, and then click or tap on Slide Size. This opens a dropdown menu with three available options: Standard (4:3) - click or tap on this option to get slides of 10 x 7.5 inches or 25.4 x 19.05 cm. Widescreen (16:9) - press to get slides of 13.33 x 7.5 inches or 33.867 x 19.05 cm.

  5. What size should my slides be, 16:9 or 4:3?

    So the 16:9 aspect ratio (1920 x 1080 pixels or 13.3″ x 7.5″) became the new standard. What size should you choose? From boardrooms to computer monitors to smartphone screens, 16:9 is the default screen aspect ratio so that's the slide size I always go with. The 16:9 format gives you a lot of slide real estate to play around with!

  6. How to Change Slide Size in Powerpoint

    If you're planning on presenting your PowerPoint presentation using a modern projector or display, then the 16:9 slide size should be your preferred choice. By default, PowerPoint will default to the 16:9 side slide. To print your slides (full size, one per page), you'll likely need to use a custom slide size, rather than one of these options.

  7. How to Change Slide Size in PowerPoint (Step-by-Step)

    By default, new PowerPoint presentations start in the 16:9 slide size format. This is the NEW standard for most modern overhead projects and monitors and is recommended for most presentations. That said, you can easily change your slide size to something else. To change your slide size in PowerPoint, simply: Navigate to the Design tab

  8. PowerPoint Slide Dimensions: A 5-Minute "How To" Guide

    Slide Dimensions. Okay, so when you open PowerPoint and start a new presentation, your slide size is set to the default which is 10 inches by 7.5 inches. This is also 1024 x 768 pixels at 96dpi. There are ways to widen the slide, make it smaller, and customize the dimensions to fit exactly what you're looking for.

  9. How to change the size of slides in Microsoft PowerPoint

    By default, slides in presentations that you create from the Blank Presentation template are set to Widescreen size. To change the size of your presentation slides, on the Design tab, in the Customize group, click the Slide Size button and then: Choose one of the pre-defined sizes:

  10. 10 Ways to Compress PowerPoint Presentations to Reduce File Size

    10. Save a copy in PDF format. It's also common to save a copy of a presentation as a PDF (portable document format) file to reduce the size and then share it with others. You can compress images during the process. To save a PowerPoint presentation as a PDF (and compress images): Click the File tab in the Ribbon.

  11. How to Reduce the File Size of a PowerPoint Presentation

    Turn Off AutoRecover Copy Everything Into a New Presentation A Possibility: Unzip the Presentation and Compress It Considering that Microsoft PowerPoint presentations are generally accompanied with tons of images, gifs, embedded videos, charts, graphs, and other content, it's no surprise that you get some pretty big files.

  12. PowerPoint Slide Size

    Standard (4:3) slides have a size of 10 x 7.5 inches or 25.4 x 19.05 cm. Widescreen (16:9) is the default slide size in Microsoft PowerPoint 2013, 2016, and 365. Widescreen (16:9) slides have a size of 13.33 x 7.5 inches or 33.867 x 19.05 cm.

  13. Presentation Sizes

    16:9 Commonly known as widescreen, 16:9 is used for highly visual content and should be your default choice of size for creating presentations. This is because almost all modern projector screens, televisions, and computers display come in widescreen as a 16:9 layout.

  14. What is the Size of a PowerPoint Slide in Pixels?

    The standard size of a PowerPoint slide is 1024×768 pixels and the widescreen PowerPoint slide is "1920×1080" pixels. It can also be adjusted based on your preferences or the requirements of the platform on which you plan to present your slides.

  15. The 5 golden rules of PowerPoint design

    To avoid this issue, work to grab your audience's attention before the presentation even starts. Instead of just having the title slide on the screen, consider creating "kiosk slides." These are a series of slides that contain a combination of interesting things for the audience to look at or engage with.

  16. 3 Ways to Reduce Powerpoint File Size

    2. Click Reduce File Size. It's toward the bottom of the drop-down menu. 3. Click Picture Quality. Doing so will invoke a drop-down menu. 4. Click Best for sending in e-mail. This option will reduce the quality of all images in your PowerPoint file to 96 ppi, which is a generally lower resolution than most images' defaults.

  17. Reduce the file size of your PowerPoint presentations

    To make your presentation more sharable with others who don't have the same fonts in their system, it's typical to embed the fonts you use. However, embedded fonts will increase your file size. To minimize the file increase, embed only those characters used in the presentation. Go to File > Options > Save.

  18. Best Resolution For PowerPoint Presentations • PresentationPoint

    By default, the size of the new presentation in PowerPoint, is currently a widescreen type presentation, 13.333 inch by 7.5 inch. Mostly you will have 96 dots per inch (dpi) on your screen settings, so this means that a default PowerPoint presentation has a resolution of 1280 by 720 pixels.

  19. Presentation Size: PPT Slides, Screen, Background Sizes Guide

    The most common presentation size is 16:9, with a 16:10 close behind. The most common dimensions change depending on the aspect ratio. For example, the most common 16:9 presentation size is 1920 x 1080, while the most common 16:10 presentation size is 2560 x 1600. We typically see two presentation formats: 4:3, standard, and 16:9, widescreen:

  20. Compress PPT Presentations Online

    Click on "Export As" and choose PowerPoint. All done! Convert, compress, and download your PPT using Smallpdf Compress My PPT You can get started with compressing your PowerPoint presentation for free right away. You don't need a Smallpdf account—just go to the tool and drop your file in! Will the Document's Formatting Remain the Same?

  21. Presentation Size

    Simply follow the standard paper sizes from the letter size (8.5″ × 11″), legal size (8.5″ × 14″), and A4 size (8.3″ × 11.7″) whereas you minimize the size of each slide while printing so that each page would contain at least four slides; thus, you save paper.

  22. Compress PowerPoint Files (PPT, PPTX, ODG) Online for Free

    Compress PPT Files. Here you can compress PowerPoint PPT, PPTX, PPTM and ODG files. online and reduce their file size of up to 90% the original size. Just select the PowerPoint file (max 50MB) to compress and wait. Select File to Compress.

  23. Compress PowerPoint Files, Online PPT Compressor

    100% Free for Anyone You can use our online file compressor for free, please share our website with your friends. Compress PowerPoint files online for free, reduce file size of PPT/PPTX/PPTM documents online, compress Microsoft PowerPoint files online, free PPT compressor. No registration, no watermarks, free to use for anyone.

  24. Compress PPT

    Max. file size 50MB ( want more?) You're in good company: Zamzar has converted over 510 million files since 2006 Why compress PPT files? PPT also goes by the name of PowerPoint Presentation and are used in all walks of life including the home, school and at work. PPT files can range in size depending on the content of the presentation.

  25. How to Embed a Video in PowerPoint

    Open your PowerPoint presentation. ... You may experience crashes, lag, and file size issues with large videos. Recommended Resolution. Ideally, you should embed 1080p videos (1920 x 1080 pixels ...