Aaron Mullins

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List of best UK literary magazines for accepting author submissions short stories poems poetry writers

List of Best UK Literary Magazines for Author Submissions

You’re a writer, you have finished writing your story and are now looking for a well-maintained list of UK literary magazines open to author submissions . Well you are in the right place!

Or perhaps you are frustrated by trawling through huge lists of UK literary magazines , only to discover that half the publications don’t exist anymore? Or the submission information is out of date?

Or you have to pay for the privilege of killing multiple trees by printing your work, posting it off and hoping to hear back sometime in the distant future, during which you aren’t allowed to do anything else with your masterpiece? Well relax, you won’t find those issues here!

What you will find is a select list of literary magazines, personally chosen by myself. Due to the often short-lived nature of the literary magazine industry, I regularly update this list so that it only contains magazines that are a) operating and b) open to submissions from writers and poets .

BOOKMARK this big list of best UK literary magazines and submit your stories at your leisure. Regularly updated, this carefully curated list is a brilliant resource for authors!

Literary Magazines for Writers

This list of the best UK literary magazines and journals are all accepting submissions from authors and poets. There are fiction magazines accepting short stories, poetry magazines accepting submissions and online magazines and journals. Get your writing seen by readers in these top magazines to publish your short story, flash fiction or poem.

Literary magazines are one of the best routes to becoming a published author . You probably won’t make a lot of money from them, but you will gain new fans and forge links within the publishing industry. You don’t always have to aim for the top literary journals to gain an army of fans.

I have also limited the list to (what I believe to be) the more reputable of the best magazines for writers . Those which have been established for a little while, aren’t on an indefinite break and aren’t associated with any specific religious, cultural or political leaning. In this modern age, they must also accept emailed or online submissions and have an appealing, easy to navigate website.

Best Magazines for Writers

Amongst these fiction and poetry magazines are several publications aimed at emerging writers. I have also included a couple of my favourite international literary magazines which are open to submissions from UK authors. If you think I have missed a UK literary magazine that fits into the above criteria and deserves to be on this list of the best ones, please let me know via my contact page .

List of best UK literary magazines for accepting author submissions short stories poems poetry writers

List of Best UK Literary Magazines

Acumen Format : Print Frequency : Three times per year Submissions : Poems, literary critiques and reviews of poetry Website : Acumen

Agenda Format : Print and Online Frequency : Three times per year Submissions : Poems and reviews of poetry Website : Agenda

Allegro Poetry Magazine Format : Online Frequency : Four times per year Submissions : Poems Website : Allegro Poetry Magazine

Apparition Literary Magazine Format : Online Frequency : Four times per year Submissions : Short stories (1,000-5,000) and poetry Website : Apparition Literary Magazine

Ash Tales Format : Online and Audio Frequency : Unscheduled Submissions : Post-apocalyptic short stories around 2,000 words Website : Ash Tales

List of best UK literary magazines accepting author submissions top journals short stories poems poetry writers

Between These Shores Format : Print Frequency : Once per year, usually November Submissions : Literary and supernatural short stories, usually submitted by July Website : Between These Shores

Carve Magazine Format : Print and Online Frequency : Unscheduled Submissions : Short stories and poetry Website : Carve Magazine

Digital Dreamers Magazine Format : Online platform and magazine Frequency : Check website Submissions : Aspiring artists, photographers, writers, poets and trendsetters aged 10-25 Website : www.digitaldreamersmagazine.com

East of the Web Format : Online Frequency : Unscheduled Submissions : Short stories Website : East of the Web

Fictive Dream Format : Online Frequency : Unscheduled Submissions : Short stories between 500 and 2,500 words Website : Fictive Dream

Foxglove Journal Format : Online Frequency : Unscheduled Submissions : Short stories and poems Website : Foxglove Journal

List of best UK literary magazines accepting author submissions top journals short stories poems poetry writers

The Frogmore Papers Format : Print Frequency : Twice per year Submissions : Short stories and poems – within strict Apr and Oct submission timeframes Website : Frogmore

Ghastling Format : Print Frequency : Twice per year Submissions : Short stories about ghosts and macabre things – up to 3,500 words Website : Ghastling

Granta Format : Print Frequency : Four times per year Submissions : Fiction, non-fiction and poetry Website : Granta

Here Comes Everyone Format : Print Frequency : Four times per year Submissions : Short stories (2,000 words), Poetry (35 lines) and Non-Fiction (1,500 words) Website : Here Comes Everyone

High Window Format : Print Frequency : Four times per year Submissions : Poems Website : High Window

List of best UK literary magazines accepting author submissions top journals short stories poems poetry writers

Hypertext Magazine Format : Online Frequency : Three times per year Submissions : Flash Fiction, Short Stories (3,000) and Poetry Website : Hypertext Magazine

Iceberg Tales Format : Print and Online Frequency : Unscheduled Submissions : Shorts stories, poetry and critiques Website : Iceberg Tales

Interpreter’s House Format : Print Frequency : Three times per year Submissions : Short fiction and poetry up to 3,000 words Website : Interpreter’s House

Litro Format : Print and Online Frequency : Twelve times per year Submissions : Short fiction around 4,000 words on specific themes Website : Litro

Loud Coffee Press Format : Online Frequency : Unscheduled Submissions : Flash Fiction (1,000) and Poetry Website : Loud Coffee Press

Magma Format : Print and Online Frequency : Three times per year Submissions : Poems Website : Magma

Memoirist Format : Online Frequency : Unscheduled Submissions : Autobiographical non-fiction Website : Memoirist

Mslexia Format : Digital and Print Frequency : Published quarterly (submission every issue) Submissions : Women Only submissions in many writing forms Website : Mslexia

One Story Format : Print Frequency : Unscheduled Submissions : Literary fiction between 3,000 and 8,000 words Website : One Story

Open Pen Format : Print Frequency : Four times per year Submissions : Short stories up to 3,000 words Website : Open Pen

Panorama Journal Format : Online Frequency : Three times per year Submissions : Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Books (Reviews and Excerpts) Website : Panorama Journal

The Phare Format : Online Frequency : Twice per year Submissions : Short fiction, flash, creative non-fiction or poetry Website : The Phare

Popshot Format : Online Frequency : Three times per year Submissions : Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Books (Reviews and Excerpts) Website : Panorama Journal

Pulp Poets Press Format : Online Frequency : Unscheduled Submissions : Short stories and poems Website : Pulp Poets Press

Rialto Format : Print Frequency : Three times per year Submissions : Poetry Website : Rialto

Seaside Gothic Format : Print Frequency : Four times per year Submissions : Flash Fiction, Poetry, Non-Fiction up to 1,000 words Website : Seaside Gothic

Scribble: The Short Story Magazine Format : Print and Ebook Frequency : Quarterly Submissions : Short stories 1,000 to 3,000 words Website : Scribble Magazine

Shoreline of Infinity Format : Print and Online Frequency : Four times per year Submissions : Science Fiction or Fantasy up to 6,000 words Website : Shoreline of Infinity

Wells Street Journal Format : Online Frequency : Twice per year Submissions : Short stories Website : Wells Street Journal

White Review Format : Print and Online Frequency : Four times per year Submissions : Short stories and poetry Website : White Review

3:AM Format : Print and Online Frequency : Unscheduled Submissions : Poetry and short stories Website : 3:AM

Writing Submissions

Good luck with your submissions! For many authors, the journey to publication often begins with submitting their work to reputable literary magazines. I hope this was a useful curated list of top-notch literary magazines that provide a platform for emerging writers to showcase their talent. It’s fun to explore exciting opportunities for writers as you navigate the diverse landscape of literary magazine submissions.

Want more support with writing, editing, publishing and marketing your book, short story or poetry? Visit my Resources for Authors page for lots more useful links, tips, tricks and advice. Including learning the art of crafting compelling submissions.

Pop in your email and click ‘Subscribe’ to get free stories , writing tips and author advice:

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Aaron Mullins ( @DrAaronMullins ) is an award winning, internationally published psychologist and bestselling author. Aaron has over 15 years experience in the publishing industry, with expertise in business strategy for authors and publishers. He started Birdtree Books Publishing where he worked as Editor-in-Chief, partnered with World Reader Charity and taught Academic Writing at Coventry University. Aaron’s book How to Write Fiction: A Creative Writing Guide for Authors has become a staple reference book for writers and those interested in a publishing career. Find out more .

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UK litmags great for new writers

Uk-based publishers for your poetry, flash fiction, short stories and creative nonfiction.

literary magazines uk

The UK is home to some great literary magazines and online journals. For this month’s list, we looked for publications that welcome new and unpublished writers from around the world, that are not restricted to a particular genre (for example, sci-fi), and that have reasonable response times.

Unless otherwise noted, the publishers on our list don’t charge fees. Some will even pay you! We’ve highlighted the forms accepted in bold – fiction means both flash fiction and short stories. After the first two entries, the list is ordered very roughly by acceptance rate – from high to low.

We didn’t include Litro , Riggwelter , Wildness and Literally Stories since they have appeared on some of our other lists, but they are also great and you should check them out.

Note:  We are a creative writing school and compile these lists for the benefit of our students. We’re happy to answer questions about  our courses  but please don’t send us your publishing queries or submissions :). Instead, click on the green links to go to the publication’s website and look for their submissions page. For more great places to submit as well as our best tips on getting published, check out our  other lists and resources .

Goatshed Press just launched in 2022 and the editors are keen to champion new writers. They plan to publish in print biannually and are currently looking for bold, exciting poetry , fiction , and creative nonfiction for their first issue (due out summer 2022). They will pay £60 for stories and personal essays over 1000 words and £25 for poems and flash fiction. The editors aim to respond in around a month. Since they reached out to us personally, we put them at the top of the list. You may want to clarify usage rights & copyrights before sending them your work.

Makarelle publishes attractive digital issues quarterly. They are looking for poetry (up to 3 poems, maximum 40 lines each) and fiction and creative nonfiction (up to 2000 words). They do charge a small submissions fee of £3 to cover their operating costs. The fee also enables them to reward the authors selected as the featured entry for each form (poetry, flash fiction, short story and creative nonfiction) with an honorarium of £10. They have four submissions windows, and their next runs from 28 February to 18 March 2022. They aim to respond in around a month. Like Goatshed, they are quite new (2021) and reached out to us, so we’ve also given them a spot at the top of the list.

Impspired , which was founded in 2019, publishes 6 online issues and 3 print anthologies per year. They’re looking for work that “shows care and attention to style,  language and form, and material that has been self-edited so that every word counts”. They prefer unpublished work but will consider previously published pieces. Send in your poetry and fiction (up to 4000 words). The editors tend to respond quickly – often in under a week!

Fiction on the Web is a one-man show and has been publishing short stories online since 1996! The publisher values quirky stories that have “strong plots, strong characters, and an evocative atmosphere” and prefers work that is between 1000 to 10,000 words long. He will consider previously published work. Genre fiction – sci-fi, fantasy, horror, crime – is welcomed.  The publisher aims to respond within a month (and usually succeeds) and will prioritise submissions from patrons and regular commenters.

Idle Ink reveals in the “strange and questionable”. Established in 2017, the magazine features poetry , fiction and essays (as well as art, articles, and reviews) in monthly online issues. Send in your prose of up to 5000 words or up to 3 poems. The editors try to make a decision within 30 days and usually do.

Fairlight Shorts is a weekly online series published by Fairlight Books. They’re looking to showcase fiction characterised by “originality, contemporary themes and superb writing”. They accept everything from flash to long-form fiction (up to 10,000 words). The editors will try to make a decision within 3 months and sometimes take a little longer.

Bandit Fiction publishes poetry (up to 50 lines per poem) and fiction and narrative non-fiction (between 250 and 3500 words) online as a part of their Read More Project. They will consider previously published work. The editors try to make a decision within 30 days but sometimes take a little longer.

En Bloc , established in 2021, publishes quarterly in print and digital formats. They’re looking for great  poetry and fiction and don’t have any particular style or word count limitations. They pay £35 per printed page as the work appears in the magazine. They don’t respond to all submissions so if you haven’t heard anything within a couple of months, assume your work was rejected.

Truffle is looking for “clever, happy, funny and entertaining fiction ” of up to 2000 words for their online magazine. The editors typically respond within a couple of months and tend to accept faster than they reject. If you’re in a hurry, you can pay £5 to hear back within 3 days.

Fictive Dream has been publishing stories online since 2016. They’re looking for fiction of between 500 and 2,500 words with “a contemporary feel that gives an insight into the human condition” to feature on their website. They aim to respond within a month and usually do.

Sepia was established in 2020 and publishes attractive online editions several times per year. You can send in your poetry (maximum 5 poems), fiction and creative nonfiction of up to 8,000 words. They’re open to submissions year-round and most of the time are able to get back to you within their target response time of 3 months.

Shooter has been publishing two themed print issues per year as well as running regular contests since 2017. You can send in poetry (up to 3 poems), short stories and creative non-fiction of between 2,000 to 6,000 words (so no flash). They pay £25 per story and £5 per poem upon publication. The submission deadline for their next issue on the theme of Out West (anything to do with western places and westward migration) is 9 May 2022. They generally send acceptances within a couple of weeks after the deadline; rejections may take longer.

Popshot Quarterly has been turning out high-quality print and digital editions since 2008. They accept poetry (between 12 and 40 lines) and fiction (between 100 and 3,000 words). All of their issues are themed. The deadline for their next issue on the theme of Joy is 1 March 2022. They don’t respond to all submissions – if you haven’t heard within 2 or 3 months, then you should assume it was a no.

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Fans and Un-Fans

Ferdinand mount.

C arefree: ​ that must be the essence of the sporting idea, whether you are doing it with Amaryllis in the shade, or on the village green with your grandchild Wilhelmine. You are disported, carried off out of yourself. In botany, a ‘sport’ is the wayward offshoot of an otherwise predictable shrub. The definition of ‘a real sport’ is a girl like Catherine Morland, the...

In its modern incarnations, sport is a spontaneous thing, blowing wherever the fans fancy. Even the impulses that have transformed Britain into a nation of joggers and gym bunnies remain mysterious. They certainly do not spring from any Department of National Fitness.

Jesuit Methods

Diarmaid macculloch.

I n the mid-18th century ​ an exceptionally adventurous European traveller might have got as far as a desert region in what is now Arizona, to be rewarded with hospitality from the presiding priest in the stately local mission church. There was likely to have been chocolate to drink, transported from Yucatán some two thousand miles to the south, served in Fr Philipp Segesser von...

What​ was this Society for which Pope Paul III provided a charter? It was not a religious order, though it is often styled as such. Its members were neither monks nor friars. Its self-descriptor as a Societas aligned it with the ‘companies’ or devotional confraternities of priests and laity in late medieval Italy.

From the blog

Think about the nation, skye arundhati thomas.

The Bollywood actor Kangana Ranaut visited the Israeli embassy in Delhi at the end of October for a photo op. ‘Like we deserve a Bharat dedicated  . . .

Necessity or Compulsion?

Eliane glaser.

I have never owned a smartphone. The man in the shop couldn’t understand my refusal. ‘You get one free with your plan,’ he told me. I share  . . .

Harry Stopes

On Friday morning, three dozen people gathered outside the Federal Ministry for Economic Co-operation and Development in Berlin to demand a permanent  . . .

Eyes on Gaza

Selma dabbagh.

At the end of last month I went to an event at the Photographer’s Gallery, where the grandson (and namesake) of the Armenian Gazan photographer  . . .

Sous la plage, les archives

Richard vinen.

Le Roy Ladurie’s fascination with what he referred to in his inaugural lecture at the Collège de France in 1973 as the ‘immobile’ history  . . .

Closed Loops

Mark papers.

I had the feeling, sitting down to my marking after the Christmas break, that I was an unwilling participant in a version of Turing’s game  . . .

Ecuador’s Internal Armed Conflict

Forrest hylton.

Considered since the 1980s to be a peaceful oasis compared to its neighbours Colombia and Peru – in part because of comprehensive land reform  . . .

Why is the US in Jordan and Syria?

Tom stevenson.

Rural fort soldiering is a classic imperial mode, so it isn’t unusual that the US does it in the Middle East, except that so many of the  . . .

Protest, what is it good for?

James butler and thomas jones.

From the Egyptian Revolution to Extinction Rebellion, the 2010s were marked by a global wave of spontaneous and largely structureless mass protests. Despite overwhelming numbers and popular support, most of these movements failed to achieve their aims, and in many cases led to worse conditions. James Butler joins Tom to make sense of the ‘mass protest decade’, sharing historical...

From the Egyptian Revolution to Extinction Rebellion, the 2010s were marked by a global wave of spontaneous and largely structureless mass protests. Despite overwhelming numbers and popular...

Emily Wilson’s translation of the Odyssey, published in 2017, the first into English by a woman, was hailed as a ‘revelation’ by the New York Times and a ‘cultural landmark’ by the Guardian. With her translation of the Iliad, ten years in the making, she has given us a complete Homer for a new generation. In her hands, this thrilling, magical and often horrifying...

Emily Wilson’s translation of the Odyssey, published in 2017, the first into English by a woman, was hailed as a ‘revelation’ by the New York Times and a ‘cultural...

Human Conditions: ‘Anti-Semite and Jew’ by Jean-Paul Sartre

Judith butler and adam shatz.

Judith Butler joins Adam Shatz for the first episode of Human Conditions to look at Jean-Paul Sartre’s 1946 book Anti-Semite and Jew , originally published in French as Réflexions Sur La Question Juive . Sartre’s ‘portraits’ of the ‘anti-Semite’ and the ‘Jew’, as he saw them, caused controversy at the time for directly confronting...

Judith Butler joins Adam Shatz for the first episode of Human Conditions to look at Jean-Paul Sartre’s 1946 book Anti-Semite and Jew , originally published in French as Réflexions...

Proust in English

Michael wood and thomas jones.

Did the foundational event of Proust’s great novel really happen? Michael Wood talks to Tom about several English translations of  In Search of Lost Time , old and new, and what they reveal about different ways of reading the novel. If the dipping of the madeleine in his tea conjures an overwhelming memory of the narrator’s childhood, it is also a challenge to the conscious...

Did the foundational event of Proust’s great novel really happen? Michael Wood talks to Tom about several English translations of  In Search of Lost Time , old and new, and what they...

Modern-ish Poets (Live): The Waste Land

Mark ford and seamus perry.

Mark Ford and Seamus Perry return for the final episode in their Close Readings series, Modern-ish Poets , looking at 19th and 20th century poetry. On the centenary of the publication of Eliot’s ‘The Waste Land’ in book form, Mark and Seamus consider how revolutionary the poem was, the numerous meanings that have been drawn out of it, and its lasting influence.This is the...

Mark Ford and Seamus Perry return for the final episode in their Close Readings series, Modern-ish Poets , looking at 19th and 20th century poetry. On the centenary of the publication of...

The Lost Art of Paste-Up

Arranging and rearranging a magazine’s layout before it goes to press is all done on computers now. But in the years before desktop publishing software, the work of cutting and pasting required a sharp scalpel, a parallel-motion board and plenty of glue.

As the  London Review of Books  celebrates its 40th anniversary, we look back at what paste-up used to involve in the...

Arranging and rearranging a magazine’s layout before it goes to press is all done on computers now. But in the years before desktop publishing software, the work of cutting and pasting...

Eric Hobsbawm: The Consolations of History

In this feature-length documentary, Anthony Wilks traces the connections between the events of Hobsbawm’s life and the history he told, from his teenage years in Germany as Hitler came to power and his communist membership, to the jazz clubs of 1950s Soho and the makings of New Labour, taking in Italian bandits, Peruvian peasant movements and the development of nationalism in...

In this feature-length documentary, Anthony Wilks traces the connections between the events of Hobsbawm’s life and the history he told, from his teenage years in Germany as Hitler came...

Collections

Lrb winter lectures 2010-2023.

Judith Butler on who owns Kafka; Hilary Mantel on royal bodies; Andrew O’Hagan on Julian Assange; Mary Beard on women in power; Patricia Lockwood on the communal mind of the internet; Meehan Crist...

Missing Pieces I: The je ne sais quoi

Writing about mystery, the unintelligible and that for which no words can be found by Jenny Diski, Jacqueline Rose, Adam Phillips, John Lanchester, Alice Spawls and Hal Foster.

Missing Pieces II: What was left out

Writing about obsolete objects, missing words and anonymous writers by Andrew O’Hagan, Amia Srinivasan, Irina Dumitrescu, Lucia Berlin, Lawrence Rainey and Sheila Fitzpatrick.

Missing Pieces III: Alchemical Pursuits

Writing about cognitive gaps, stolen artworks and missing the things you never had by Hilary Mantel, Michael Neve, Rosa Lyster, Clancy Martin, James Davidson and Malcolm Gaskill.

Analysis Gone Wrong

Unorthodox psychoanalytic encounters in the LRB archive by Wynne Godley, Sherry Turkle, Mary-Kay Wilmers, Nicholas Spice, Mikkel Borch-Jacobsen, Jenny Diski, Brigid Brophy, Adam Phillips, D.J. Enright...

Living by the Clock

Writing about time by David Cannadine, Perry Anderson, Angela Carter, Stanley Cavell, Barbara Everett, Edward Said, John Banville, Rebecca Solnit, David Wootton, Jenny Diski, Malcolm Bull, Andrew O’Hagan...

Gossip and Notes on Work and Reading

For the first time since 1982, there is no annual Diary by Alan Bennett. He says his life is so dull he won’t inflict it on LRB readers. If it suddenly gets more interesting he promises he’ll let us...

Writing about drinking by Victor Mallet, Anne Carson, John Lanchester, Wendy Cope, Christopher Hitchens, Tom Jaine, Jenny Diski, Marina Warner, Clancy Martin and John Lloyd. 

War on God! That is Progress!

Writing about anarchism in the LRB archive by Steve Fraser, Susan Watkins, T.J. Clark, Zoë Heller, Hal Foster, Wes Enzinna and Jessica Olin.

Suffering Souls

Writing for Halloween by Leslie Wilson, John Sturrock, Thomas Jones, Michael Newton, Marina Warner and Gavin Francis.

Ministry of Apparitions

Writing about superstition by Matthew Sweeney, Hilary Mantel, Malcolm Gaskill, Patricia Lockwood, Theodore Zeldin, Katherine Rundell, Peter Campbell, Barbara Herrnstein Smith, Angela Carter, Ian Penman...

The day starts now

Summer morning reading from the LRB archive by Angela Carter, Eleanor Birne, Steven Shapin, Tom Crewe, Patrick McGuinness and Jenny Diski. 

Summer lunchtime reading from the LRB archive by James Meek, Penelope Fitzgerald, Bee Wilson, Colm Tóibín and Rosa Lyster. 

Oh What A Night

Summer evening reading from the LRB archive by Anne Carson, Rosemary Hill, John Gallagher, Zoë Heller, Anne Diebel and Patricia Lockwood.

World Weather

From June 2022 to June 2023, the LRB has been collaborating with the World Weather Network, a constellation of weather stations set up by 28 arts organisations in oceans, deserts, mountains, farmland,...

Writing about thinking up other worlds by Glen Newey, Terry Eagleton, Sheila Fitzpatrick, Susan Pedersen, David Trotter and Anthony Pagden. 

In the Classroom

Writing about teaching and learning by William Davies, Ian Jack, Jenny Turner, Thomas Jones, Lorna Finlayson, Paul Foot, Wang Xiuying, Marina Warner and Stefan Collini.  

Plainclothes in our Living Rooms

Writing about the police by Barbara Wootton, Daniel Trilling, Alice Spawls, Adam Reiss, Ronan Bennett, Thomas Jones, Paul Foot, Katrina Forrester, Melanie McFadyean, Matt Foot and Christopher Tayler.

Little Monstrosities

Writing about dog/human bonds by Hannah Rose Woods, Elizabeth Marshall Thomas, Iain Sinclair, Michael Burns, Anne Carson, Alison Light, Frank Cioffi, Amia Srinivasan and Jenny Turner.

How shall we repaint the kitchen?

Writing about colour in the LRB archive by Ian Hacking, Anne Enright, John Kinsella, Alison Light, Julian Bell, David Garrioch, Emily LaBarge and Stephen Mulhall.

LRB Screen x Mubi: ‘American Psycho’

American Psycho on 26 February is the first of this year’s six screenings at the Garden Cinema, in partnership with MUBI: Mary Harron’s elegant adaptation of Bret Easton Ellis’s satirical horror novel. Harron herself will be introducing the film and discussing it afterwards with host Gareth Evans.

LRB Winter Lectures 2024

Buy tickets here for this year's Winter Lectures at St James Church, Clerkenwell: Pankaj Mishra on the Shoah after Gaza, Hazel V. Carby on decolonising history and Terry Eagleton on the origins of culture.

Aniefiok Ekpoudom & Gary Younge: Where We Come From

Lrb screen x mubi: ‘american psycho’, pankaj mishra: the shoah after gaza.

In the next issue: Geoff Mann on America's favourite gun.

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The Surreal and the Strange through Prompts: A Generative Workshop

This four-week workshop will walk students through the great surreal prose poets of our age. The tutor, Jose Hernandez Diaz, will share his own unique prompts and sample prose poems written to the same prompts, so students can gain insight into the improvisation and editing process. Students will walk away with tips and valuable advice on getting their poems out there.

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Writing Your Truth

We’re pleased to offer a summer masterclass with award-winning and Women’s Prize for Fiction Futures shortlisted novelist, Jessica Andrews. This two-week, intensive workshop will walk students through how to write from lived experience, and how to turn their lives and memories into stories.

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Sensuality in the Short Story

This four-week online writing workshop will give students the skills to confidently incorporate sex and sensuality into their writing.

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Our latest edition

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Litro #184: Memory edition

Issue #184, in our open call for submissions, it was memory that bubbled to the surface as an overarching theme. There was memory of past relationships, of families, of people we used to be; memories of past summers, childhoods, and the C-who-shall-not-be-named pandemic of 2020 to 2022.

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Our Best Small Fictions Nominations 2024

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A Tree Called Mayakovsky

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Visualizing Change: Publicis Norway’s Creative Approach to Climate Awareness

Visualizing Change: Publicis Norway’s Creative Approach to Climate Awareness

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2023: the Year of Translated Fiction

2023: the Year of Translated Fiction

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More than Music | Litro Lab Podcast

“My Son Was Taught”, “The Orchid of the House” & “We Haven’t Eaten” | Litro Lab Podcast

“My Son Was Taught”, “The Orchid of the House” & “We Haven’t Eaten” | Litro Lab Podcast

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Structo

“A journal that puts high stock in quality literature with some meat on its bones that you can really chew”

— The Review Review

“Continuing to surpass the high standards they have set themselves”

— Best British Short Stories

“Annoyingly awesome”

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Current issue

Issue 21 – first half of 2023.

This issue kicks off our new digital-first format of weekly releases. Head to the issue page for the latest from Structo . .

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Structo is an independent literary magazine and press. We publish short stories, poetry, interviews and essays. We often publish work in translation.

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Literary Review

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Literary Review  covers all the latest books each month, ranging from history and biography to memoir and fiction. Each issue contains sixty-four pages of reviews from  some of the  leading authors, journalists, academics and thinkers in Britain in a variety of fields. It aims to reach a wide audience of readers who enjoy intelligent and accessible writing.

The magazine is available for purchase in most good bookshops and newsagents. Subscribers receive eleven issues a year (including a December/January double issue) and gain access to the magazine’s digital archive, available on this site. To view the subscription rates,  click here .

Subscribers also gain access to the Literary Review app, which includes the digital archive. To take advantage of this, visit  Exact Editions  and enter your subscription number and postcode, which will prompt you to create an account.

“ Literary Review is extremely informative, well-written and altogether enjoyable. It is my favourite monthly magazine.” –  Muriel Spark

“This magazine is flush with tight, smart writing.” – Washington Post

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Literary Review was founded in Edinburgh in 1979 by Dr Anne Smith, head of the English Department at Edinburgh University. She wanted to create a lively, intelligent literary magazine for people who love reading but shudder at academic and intellectual jargon.

From the start, Literary Review plugged in to the best and most exciting current writing. The reviewers are usually authors themselves, not just critics. In the 1980s, Auberon Waugh became editor. For fourteen years Waugh led the magazine and gave it the high profile it has today, including bringing on board Willie Rushton as cover illustrator. Nancy Sladek has edited the magazine for the last fifteen years and in 2015 was awarded the prestigious Benson Medal for outstanding services to English literature.

The iconic covers have been illustrated since 1997 by Chris Riddell, who was made Children’s Laureate in 2015.

Contributors

Contributors to the magazine have included, among many others, Diana Athill, Kingsley Amis, Martin Amis, Beryl Bainbridge, John Banville, Julian Barnes, Hilary Mantel, John Mortimer, Malcolm Bradbury, A S Byatt, Paul Johnson, David Starkey, John Gray, Robert Harris, Nick Hornby, Richard Ingrams, Joseph O’Neill, Lynn Barber, Derek Mahon, Oleg Gordievsky, John Sutherland and D J Taylor.

The Literary Review Bookshop at Heywood Hill

Literary Review  is proud to have teamed up with esteemed Mayfair independent bookshop Heywood Hill to offer an unparallelled book-buying service.

All titles reviewed in the magazine – and any other books you might think of – are available for purchase and can be delivered anywhere across the world, always arriving beautifully packaged in Heywood Hill’s signature livery.

Visit the bookshop online here  or in person at 10 Curzon Street, London W1J 5HH.

Reach the bookshop by phone on +44 (0)20 7629 0647 or by email at  [email protected]

Editorial Assistant

This is a part-time, entry-level position for someone with a strong interest in books and an enthusiasm for magazine publishing. The role is primarily an editorial one and involves fact-checking, copy editing, picture research, social media and newsletter management, liaising with publishers and literary festivals, and a variety of administrative tasks within the office. Some experience with InDesign is highly desirable. The successful candidate will be required to work three to four days a week in the magazine’s office in central London.

To apply, please send a CV and covering letter of no more than a page to [email protected] by 7 February 2024.

Literary Review incorporating Quarto is published from 44 Lexington Street, London W1F 0LW. ISSN 0144 4360

The best literary magazines around

Our edit of the very best literary magazines to subscribe to..

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Imagine it: comfy chair, blanket, tea or coffee or a glass of wine, your favourite literary magazine. Could there be a more perfect way to pass the time? This list features a select few literary journals, quarterlies and online magazines that we love to lose ourselves in.

1. The White Review

The White Review no. 12

This quarterly arts journal published in print and online is a thing of beauty. You'll find fiction, poetry, interviews and features on literature and the arts. As well as established writers, it also features new and emerging writers and artists within its beautifully set pages. It takes its name from  La Revue Blanche , a Parisian magazine that ran for four years at the turn of the twentieth century. ‘Alarmingly elegant … it’s good to see young Londoners doing a little magazine with style’, said  The Paris Review . Which leads us on to...

2. The Paris Review

The Paris Review - first issue

A few decades older,  The Paris Review  began its life in 1953. It was founded by Harold L. Humes, Peter Matthiessen and George Plimpton, with the intention of 'removing criticism from the dominating place it holds in most literary magazines and putting it pretty much where it belongs, i.e., somewhere near the back of the book.' As well as introducing some of today's greatest writers to the literary scene, it has published some of the most searching interviews with writers around. There are now four volumes of  The Paris Review   Interviews , well worth a read as well as the regular quarterly editions. Much of the content is also available online.  

3. The New Yorker

The New Yorker cover

The New Yorker  celebrates its 95th birthday in 2020, and it's still as good as it ever was. Beyond-sharp cartoons, smart politics, fiction with a kick and beautiful poetry online and in print every week. If you get tired of the dailies all telling the same story, you'll find  The New Yorker  wonderfully refreshing: the angles it takes are always off the beaten track and its criticism really thinks for itself. The podcast is also excellent.

4. Guernica: a magazine of arts and politics

If you're looking for something to take you beyond the bounds of your usual reading, then this might be it.  Guernica  places a heavy emphasis on writing about lesser-known places and cultures, whether in – you guessed it – every day.

Granta magazine cover

What do Martin Amis, Pat Barker, Graham Swift and Rose Tremain have in common? They were among the twenty writers included on  Granta 's first Best of Young British Novelists list. As well as producing this selection every ten years – which has been proved almost impeccably accurate by the subsequent high-flying careers of the authors it has featured –  Granta 's quarterly magazine is a veritable feast of fiction, non-fiction and poetry. With themes that surprise and provoke, this book-like mag is not to be missed. 

​ 6.  Hazlitt

Hazlitt  is the brain child of Penguin Random House, Canada, but it's by no means limited to talking about the books they publish, with features, fiction and essays on more subjects than you can count, by established and new authors alike. It's savvy, thoughtful and stylish; the accompanying podcast,  Arcade , is well worth downloading, too.

Reading  Litro  is always exciting. As well as the almost bimonthly print magazine, they also publish new short stories online every Sunday, review the latest arts events and publications, and write incisive commentary pieces. They recently announced Litro Represents, a new kind of agency to support new writers. Rather than accepting submissions, they read unagented stories published by  Litro  to find tomorrow's leading authors. 

This quarterly magazine started in 1959 and has been publishing arts and literary writing ever since. It has had some high profile editors in its time, from Carol Ann Duffy to J. G. Ballard, and since 2013 its founder, Martin Bax, has been back at the helm. Particularly good for poetry and critical writing. 

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The best podcasts for book lovers, inspiring feminist poems by non-binary and female poets, the best short story books and collections for 2024.

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The London Magazine is the UK’s oldest literary magazine, proud to have published some of the biggest names in literature including Angela Carter, Joan Didion, T. S. Eliot, Sylvia Plath, George Orwell, Jean Rhys, and Virginia Woolf. We are open to unsolicited submissions of poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and reviews for our print edition and online.

We are also committed to encouraging marginalised and underrepresented writers to submit, particularly writers of colour, working class writers, writers with disabilities, and writers who are queer, transgender, non-binary and/or gender non-conforming.

We are interested in a wide variety of topics and styles of writing. Writers should carefully review the guidelines below before submitting work via our online portal. Similarly, we find those who are familiar with the publication stand a far better chance of having their submissions accepted, so we do recommend reading the latest copy of our print journal which can be purchased using the link below:

We will be open for free submissions during the following periods:

1 – 30 September 1 – 30 November 1 – 31 January 1 – 31 March 1 – 31 May 1 – 31 July

We charge a fee of £3.00 for submissions outside of those windows but i f you are a low-income writer and would like to apply for free entry, please read our guidelines for low-income entry. During periods in which our prizes are live, we will be closed for open submissions in that genre. 

Non-Fiction pieces should be between 800 and 2,000 words.

For Short Fiction, above all we look for elegance in style, structure and characterisation. We are open to both experimental and traditional forms, although we do not normally publish genre fiction such as science fiction or fantasy writing, or erotica. Please make sure they are no more than 4,000 words in length.

Poetry should display a commitment to the ultra-specificities of language, and show a refined sense of simile and metaphor. The structure should be tight and exact. Poems should be no longer than 40 lines. Please submit no more than 5 poems in any one submission.

Submission Process

Work should be submitted either via Submittable or by email. Simultaneous submissions are accepted, but please do not duplicate material and we ask that you notify us if your submission is accepted elsewhere. Please allow up to 12 weeks for us to review your work.

We wish you the best of luck with your submission.

A note from the editors

Commissioned articles received by a member of the editorial team are subject to editorial approval. Those accepted for the website will only receive a fee unless they are accepted for print also.

While we do occasionally publish extracts from existing books and collections, for general submissions to The London Magazine please only send previously unpublished work. If you are interested in publishing an extract with us, please email [email protected] with ‘Extract’ in the subject line.

  • Please do not duplicate submissions.
  • If submitting multiple pieces through Submittable, please combine them into one document.
  • We only publish original material, i.e. first-ever publication. We cannot run a piece that has already appeared on the web or elsewhere in print. We can, however, publish an original translation if the work has previously appeared in another language, but never before in English.
  • Please ensure you have submitted your piece through the correct Submittable category. For example, a short story submitted in the poetry category will not be considered. Note that running competitions will have their own Submittable category, which will be clearly signposted.
  • We no longer accept postal submissions.

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The Rialto - the poetry magazine to read

Poetry with an axe to grind

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NEW RIALTO 100 - OUT NOW

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NEW RIALTO 99 - OUT NOW

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NEW RIALTO 98 - STILL IN STOCK

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RIALTO 97 - A FEW LEFT

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New Pamphlet– Holly Singlehurst

The sea turned thick as honey – available now.

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SELIMA HILL - FRIDGE

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SIMON MADDRELL - QUEERFELLA

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ANITA PATI - DODO PROVOCATEUR

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Subscribing to The Magazine

You can buy The Rialto Poetry Magazine or subscribe here

Poetry Submissions

Submissions to the magazine, publications and competitions.

In The Rialto

“What news on the Rialto?” Forthcoming issues, events, and submission calls.

IN THE RIALTO

Questions and Answers

Questions and Answers

by Guest Blogger | Oct 23, 2023

Q. How do I find out what sort of poems The Rialto publishes? So I can select from my poems ones that they’ll like. A. The answer to that used to be simply buy the magazine and read it. However recent issues (96, 98, 100) have been guest edited (by Degna Stone, Edward...

Close Reading

by Michael Mackmin | Jul 17, 2023

From time to time, when I’m reading for The Rialto, I come across poems that I really need to write about. Usually my long running wrestle with procrastination gets in the way, but when I wrote the recent Newsletter I found that I was writing about a poem from Issue...

Nature and Place 2023 winners announced

Nature and Place 2023 winners announced

by Nick Stone | Apr 22, 2023

We have now received the results of the 2023 Nature and Place Poetry Competition back from Ian McMillan and are delighted to announce that the winners are: 1st Prize of £1000 – ‘Kharkiv Zoo’ - Anastasia Taylor-Lind2nd Prize of £500 – ‘Spoons’ – Jo Bratten3rd Prize of...

A reading from The Rialto issue 98

A reading from The Rialto issue 98

by Nick Stone | Nov 9, 2022

The Rialto and Nottingham UNESCO City of Literature invites you to join us online on zoom, with Editor of issue R98, Edward Doegar, for a reading from The Rialto issue number 98. To celebrate the issue we are co-hosting an online reading that showcases the diverse...

Machine poems

Machine poems

by Guest Blogger | Oct 11, 2022

‘…when I write about being a cyborg, I challenge reality’ —The Cyborg Jillian Weise, ‘How a Cyborg Challenges Reality’ (The New York Times) ‘Every sexuality has a knowledge and technology and every new way/to move beasts from one crate to another produces a metaphor’...

Crow drop

by Guest Blogger | Aug 30, 2022

A radio show I sometimes tune into has a long-running feature where listeners write in about objects that have fallen on them from out of the sky – a slice of white bread, an unopened Mars Bar, jar lids and bottle caps, once (or did I imagine it?) a lady’s watch....

About the rialto

Welcome to the website for The Rialto , where you can find out who we are and what we do, read poems from the magazine, and connect up with our social media pages. You can buy subscriptions, single copies, pamphlets and books. You can learn how to submit your poetry for possible publication, and you can read articles and blogs by the editors, poets and guest writers.

The Rialto magazine is edited by Michael Mackmin working with Rishi Dastidar, Edward Doegar, Will Harris and Degna Stone, who are graduates of our Editor Development Programme.

We’d like to say thank you to our loyal subscribers and to the Arts Council of England whose support and encouragement over years have made possible The Rialto . We invite you, reader, to join the team: help make poetry happen by subscribing now.

“The Rialto is the poetry magazine to read – publishing poems that are formally inventive and alive to the ‘here and now’ of the world, but always with a commitment to the humane and compassionate qualities I believe the best poetry has. It has led the way in nurturing new talent.”

THE MAGAZINE

The founding editors, Michael among them, believed in a ‘Republic of Poetry’, an inclusive and diverse world of poetry, one that was open to experiment in form and content. We strive to keep this vision alive.

The magazine appears three times a year and each issue, with its spacious A4 pages, has fifty or so poems, an editorial and occasional, commissioned, prose pieces. Most of the space is occupied by the best new poems we can find, all wrapped up in our famously vibrant beautiful covers.

The Rialto has been called ‘Simply the best’ by Carol Ann Duffy and ‘A terrific magazine’ by Seamus Heaney.

BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS

At the start of the new millennium The Rialto published a short run of first collections. In 2005 we turned our energy to publishing pamphlets and began our Bridge Pamphlets list. These have so far been by poets who we’ve asked to submit work. We also run a poetry pamphlet competition which has become a fixture of how we discover new work. Oh, and we  haven’t forgotten about first collections – we launched Dean Parkin’s The Swan Machine at last autumn’s Aldeburgh Poetry Festival, and published Matt Howard’s award winning Gall in 2018.

Laura Scott’s pamphlet What I Saw won the Michael Marks Award in 2014, and several of our first collections are winners of major awards.

“The magazine is consistently one of, if not the best spotter of emerging talent in the UK – as a writer you know that you have arrived if one of your poems goes in. It’s more than an imprimatur of quality – it’s a rite of passage.”

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Rialto Magazine 100

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Rialto Magazine 99

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Rialto Magazine 92

Buy pamphlets.

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The sea turned thick as honey

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Dodo Provocateur

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you are mistaken

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The Rainbow Faults

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Rialto poetry, blogs and news

Poems in the rialto.

The purpose of this section of the site is to allow us to showcase or preview poems in our publications. We hope to invite writers of the poems to respond and give their view of the work.

Aug 30, 2022

A two poem blog

A two poem blog

Aug 28, 2018

Here is one of my favourite poems from the current issue (No. 90), of the magazine. CATFORD CYCLING CLUB RACE THROUGH ASHDOWN FOREST The normal fawn-coloured morning is scored through        with a fast-moving artery of red the jerseys of young bearded men on a...

1 Poultry

Dec 15, 2017

Shoot up in the fast lift, poke the faux gras with toothpick heels. Late lunch at the Coq d’Argent – accept a drink, plan your exit. After two pm the old religion can be smelt – some urban plague myth – even here, halfway to the holding stacks...

Decompression by William Stephenson

Decompression by William Stephenson

Jul 4, 2017

Decompression The induction program’s willow pattern eyes and terracotta lips matched those of the woman I married in my first incarnation. She whispered, Just you and me darling me darling – a glitch, surely, A stutter in the software – so make yourself yourself. She...

HOW TO BAKE A GINGERBREAD GIRL   BY EMMA SIMON

HOW TO BAKE A GINGERBREAD GIRL BY EMMA SIMON

Mar 23, 2017

HOW TO BAKE A GINGERBREAD GIRL   by Emma Simon Paint blue icing on her fingertips, fingers that could snap with cold, dipped into fridges and glass chillers placing cockleshell cakes in pretty rows. Tie back her hair, dress her in sexless tabards, dab with jam. Press...

Home by Neetha Kunaratnam

Home by Neetha Kunaratnam

Mar 10, 2017

HOME by Neetha Kunaratnam June 23, 2016   I Go Home. We voted leave… Her indignant jaw trembled as she seethed, and the deadpan response I might have mustered froze on my lips, as she brandished a crumpled flyer and unleashed its litany of stats. I’m going I said and...

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Best 10 UK Literary Magazines & Publications

  • Neon Literary Magazine
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Here are 10 Best UK Literary Magazines you should follow in 2024

1. Neon Literary Magazine

Neon Literary Magazine

2. Structo Magazine

Structo Magazine

3. New England Review Magazine

New England Review Magazine

4. Times Literary Supplement

Times Literary Supplement

5. Neon Books Magazine

Neon Books Magazine

6. Litro Magazine

Litro Magazine

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Best Literary Magazines of 2024

Curated with love by reedsy, search for literary magazines.

Getting your work published in a literary magazine can help you reach new audiences and launch your writing career.

Filter through 100+ magazines by format (print or online), traffic, and category. We’ll be updating the list throughout the year, so be sure to bookmark this page!

Online submissions?

We found 133 magazines that match your search 🔦

literary magazines uk

Print magazine for Short Fiction ,

PROMPTED is a celebration of the power of inspiration, and the places our imagination can take us with the slightest nudge. Each story is inspired by a one-sentence prompt, and written in a single week.

🌍 Territory:  Worldwide 💰 Submission fee:  $5 Frequency:  4 times a year Online submissions: Yes Submission guidelines

literary magazines uk

Invisible City

Online magazine for Art , Fiction , Non-Fiction , Poetry , Short Fiction ,

Invisible City is an online publication of the MFA in Writing Program at the University of San Francisco that publishes in the fall and spring. We seek work that encourages us to see the world from new perspectives and different angles, ones that we may not have previously considered or imagined.

🌍 Territory:  United States 💰 Submission fee:  $0 Frequency:  2 times a year Online submissions: Yes Submission guidelines

literary magazines uk

State of Matter

Online magazine for Fiction , Poetry ,

State of Matter is on a quest to define what Speculative Fiction means from a South Asian perspective. We publish fiction and poetry from international authors, with a keen eye for South Asian writing.

🌍 Territory:  India 💰 Submission fee:  $0 Frequency:  4 times a year Online submissions: Yes Submission guidelines

literary magazines uk

Illuminations of the Fantastic

Online magazine for Art , Fiction , Non-Fiction , Poetry ,

Illuminations of the Fantastic is a monthly online magazine that encompasses works of Fantasy, Science Fiction, Horror, Adventure, Mystery, Poetry, History, Travelogue, Essay, and Review.

🌍 Territory:  Worldwide 💰 Submission fee:  $0 Frequency:  7 times a year Online submissions: Yes Submission guidelines

literary magazines uk

Outlander Magazine

Outlander is a digital zine and online platform that celebrates the awkward, the eccentric, and the weirdly beautiful. While its website is always open for submission, it also releases four themed issues throughout the year. Outlander is additionally home to THE LAB, an interview platform that amplifies the voices of upcoming creators.

🌍 Territory:  United States 💰 Submission fee:  $0 Frequency:  4 times a year Online submissions: Yes Submission guidelines

literary magazines uk

Pigeon Review

Online magazine for Art , Fiction , Short Fiction ,

A new literary and art magazine dedicated to showcasing emerging artists and writers.

🌍 Territory:  United States 💰 Submission fee:  $0 Frequency:  12 times a year Online submissions: Yes Submission guidelines

literary magazines uk

Ginosko Literary Journal

Online magazine for Fiction , Non-Fiction , Poetry , Short Fiction ,

Ginosko: A Greek word meaning the recognition of truth from experience.

literary magazines uk

Curlew Quarterly

Print & Online magazine for Art , Fiction , Non-Fiction , Poetry , Scripts , Short Fiction ,

Curlew Quarterly, New York’s literary and photo journal, publishes poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction, which includes nearly all forms of reporting and journalism. Launched in August of 2017, our printed journal and online Daily celebrate the lives, homes, and work of poets, writers, and distinct professionals living in New York, NY.

literary magazines uk

Sky Island Journal

Online magazine for Non-Fiction , Poetry , Short Fiction , Translations ,

Sky Island Journal is an independent, international, free-access literary journal. We publish accomplished, well-established authors—side by side—with fresh, emerging voices. Our mission is to provide our over 100,000 readers in 145 countries with a powerful, focused, advertising-free literary experience that transports them: one that challenges them intellectually and moves them emotionally.

🌍 Territory:  United States 💰 Submission fee:  $5 Frequency:  4 times a year Online submissions: Yes Submission guidelines

literary magazines uk

The Raven Review

Online magazine for Fiction , Poetry , Short Fiction ,

Based in Central Texas, The Raven Review is a literary magazine that publishes poetry and short fiction that explores the human experience through dark, atmospheric writing. Since 2019, the magazine has been publishing both seasoned and newbie writers with the explicit goal of helping them gain exposure.

literary magazines uk

Indie Bites

Print & Online magazine for Art , Fiction , Poetry , Short Fiction ,

Indie Bites is a quarterly indie fantasy anthology, created to promote the work of indie authors. It features short fantasy fiction (prose and poetry) from self-published, hybrid and unpublished authors, together with interviews and reviews of indie books from book bloggers.

🌍 Territory:  United Kingdom 💰 Submission fee:  $0 Frequency:  4 times a year Online submissions: Yes Submission guidelines

literary magazines uk

Flora Fiction Literary Magazine

Flora Fiction is a collective of creative muses and inspiration. From original writing to reviews in music and entertainment, there’s always something to be discovered.

🌍 Territory:  United States Frequency:  4 times a year Online submissions: Yes Submission guidelines

literary magazines uk

Adelaide Literary Magazine

Print & Online magazine for Art , Non-Fiction , Poetry , Short Fiction ,

Founded by Stevan V. Nikolic and Adelaide Franco Nikolic in 2015, the magazine’s aim is to publish quality poetry, fiction, nonfiction, artwork, and photography, as well as interviews, articles, and book reviews, written in English and Portuguese.

literary magazines uk

Print & Online magazine for Art , Fiction , Non-Fiction , Poetry , Short Fiction ,

F(r)iction is a triannual publication that boasts work from both industry legends and emerging writers. Each issue is carefully curated to evaluate an important cultural topic from vastly different perspectives. We accept short fiction, creative nonfiction, flash fiction, comics, and poetry submissions all year round, and also host contests featuring guest judges and cash prizes twice a year (each spring and fall). Every piece published in F(r)iction is also accompanied by custom artwork, making our journal a visual odyssey from cover to cover!

🌍 Territory:  United States 💰 Submission fee:  $3 Frequency:  3 times a year Online submissions: Yes Submission guidelines

literary magazines uk

Online magazine for Art , Fiction , Non-Fiction , Poetry , Scripts , Short Fiction ,

Shorts is a free online magazine launched in February 2020 with the aim of bringing together writers and creative artists from all over the world. Shorts particularly encourages submissions from marginalised communities, and from new and emerging writers. Shorts was established in a time of growing isolationism on the part of the UK and the US, and aims to combat this by uniting global creatives and nurturing unheard voices. It is an LGBTQ+ friendly platform with a liberal outlook.

Run a literary magazine? Submit it to our directory!

The halls of literary success are paved with authors who got their start appearing in literary magazines — such as Zora Neale Hurston, Truman Capote, William Faulkner, Edith Wharton, Ursula Le Guin, J.D. Salinger, George Saunders, Alice Munro, Flannery O’Connor, and many more. 

For centuries, literary magazines have highlighted works that would otherwise struggle to reach readers. Poetry, short stories, essays are all forms of writing that own very tiny shares in the publishing landscape — except in the world of literary magazines, where they reign supreme.

If you’re an aspiring author, submitting to literary magazines is a great way to get your foot into the door of the publishing industry, as it allows you to build up your credentials and reach readers. That being said, having your work appear in a literary magazine isn’t as easy as hitting “submit.” While they can act as a stepping stone for writers who wish to go on to have a career in publishing, you shouldn’t view literary magazines as simply a means to an end — if only because doing so will very likely reduce your chances of ever actually being featured in one of them.

And on that note, let’s get started with our first tip for getting your work featured in some of the best literary magazines out there.

Tips for submitting to literary magazines 

Ensure you’re submitting to the right places.

When you think of literary magazines, your mind might automatically go to The New Yorker . Or it might go to independent webzines that specialize in very niche genres. Maybe you think of university-funded quarterlies like The New England Review . All this is to say that the range of lit mags out there is broad and the kinds of things they publish also ranges — from short lit fic to flash space operas, and everything in between. 

So before you decide to submit your short stories or poetry to a magazine, make sure you do your due diligence and research what kinds of things they publish, and where your work is really a match.

Don’t submit to tons of publications all at one

“Cast a wide net” shouldn’t be your mantra when it comes to submitting to lit mags. As mentioned, all magazines have their own styles. So spending your time ensuring your submissions are targeted at the right places is much more valuable than sending your writing to as many different publications as possible. Editors can usually scout fairly quickly the pieces that have been submitted en masse, without any regard for their specific publication.

Instead, make a list of the magazines you want to submit to and group them into tiers. Tier One can be your top five magazines, Tier Two your next five favorite, and so on. This is not only a good way to make sure you’re giving each submission care and attention, it’s also a good way to make sure you don’t get the same piece of writing accepted by two different magazines, forcing you to pull your submission from one of them.

When it comes to making your list, don’t only consider what magazines have prestige, huge audiences, or hefty cash payouts. The best magazines to submit to are the ones that you actually enjoy reading. Because chances are those are the magazines that are going to be most interested in the kind of things you’re writing.

Keep your cover letter short and to-the-point

Editors are not won over by cover letters. If you’ve written a great story and have publishing credentials to boot, sure, your cover letter might help win them over. But if your submission isn’t strong, your cover letter is going to mean nil. So let your cover letter mention the important bits, make sure it provides any specific information that’s requested in the submission guidelines, and let your entry do the heavy lifting. 

Typically, a cover letter will mention a couple of the previous places you’ve been published as well as any other relevant experience you might have. You can also add a personal touch by mentioning a previous story or issue you particularly enjoyed.

What your letter shouldn’t mention is every place you’ve been published (up to 5 will suffice). It shouldn’t summarize your entry, your life story, or your “writing journey,” and any previous experience you mention should be related in some way to writing, publishing, or your entry.

Thoroughly edit your story — and follow submission guidelines!

An editor is probably not going to banish an otherwise very strong entry to the slush pile because of a misplaced typo. That being said, they have lots of reading to do, and while most editors won’t consciously read an entry looking for reasons not to like it, at the end of the day they can only accept so many pieces. So if you make their jobs easier by giving them a reason to pass on your piece, they’re going to take it. If it’s not adequately proofread, there’s only so long someone can continue reading even the strongest writing before the spelling errors convince them to stop.

Another quick way to convince an editor to pass on your entry is to not follow the submission guidelines. If the guidelines ask you to include specific information or to format your story in a certain way, follow those instructions to a tee. If the guide doesn’t tell you how to format your story, go classic: Arial or Times New Roman 12-point font, double-spaced. To ensure your submissions look professional, you can always copy and paste them into our free formatting tool, the Reedsy Book Editor !

Editors do want to like your submission

The publishing world is competitive, so it’s natural for authors to stress about all the little details of submitting to a literary magazine — whether to add page numbers to their document, who to address in their cover letter, whether they’ll stand a chance as a brand new author, etc. And while we did just mention that editors generally won’t put up a fight if you give them a reason to pass on your entry, they also won’t toss aside a submission they love just because the full package isn’t 100% perfect.

Remember, editors are looking for quality art they feel is going to resonate with their readers. If you can provide them with that, they’re going to be on your side.

Don’t just do it for the money or prestige

If you’re submitting to lit mags with the hopes of raking in the cash, you are more than likely going to be disappointed. Sure, there are some big-time magazines out there that offer larger paycheques to their writers and widespread readership, but many of them don’t accept unsolicited submissions — or come with extremely steep competition.

Most literary magazines are run on very tiny budgets that can’t afford to pay the writers they feature. But that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t submit to them. The exposure and credibility an emerging writer can gain from having their work featured across a number of smaller, indie publications are still very valuable and shouldn’t be overlooked.

Have fun — and be proud of what you publish!

Yes, having your work appear in literary magazines can help build up your publishing resume. But if you’re not writing and publishing work you feel really proud of, what’s the point? Readers don’t need more stories that make it into magazines because they follow the right trends or say the right things, we want literature that the author clearly loved writing. 

So, as we mentioned earlier, don’t just submit a piece because you think it’s going to get you somewhere. Submit something because you think it’s strong, unique, and worthwhile. Write and submit work you can proudly stand by! 

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Publishing Perspectives

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literary magazines uk

In the UK, a New Literary Magazine, With International Intent

In Feature Articles by Porter Anderson June 24, 2022

The new literary magazine ‘Fictionable’ launches June 27 with short works including graphic fiction and translation.

literary magazines uk

By Porter Anderson, Editor-in-Chief | @Porter_Anderson

‘Specially Commissioned Short Fiction’

literary magazines uk

Fictionable is described as a quarterly that publishes “specially commissioned short fiction from all over the globe, bringing diverse writers from around the world to a global audience.” The project does intend to widen its footprint, as Lea is quoted saying, having had donors’ crowdfunding support “from Berlin to British Columbia and from Auckland to Paris.”

literary magazines uk

The magazine promises a story in translation in each issue and, likewise, a graphic short story every quarter, as well as text entries.

In the Opening Edition of ‘Fictionable’

literary magazines uk

In the first edition being released Monday, the translated entry is a story set in New Orleans, “ Mon cousin d’Amérique, ” by the Congo-born writer Alain Mabanckou, who teaches literature at UCLA in the States. It’s translated by Helen Stevenson whose own Instructions for Visitors: Life and Love in a French Town (Simon & Schuster, 2018) may ring a bell.

She was longlisted for the 2017 (then-Man) Booker International Prize for her translation of Mabanckou’s Black Moses (Serpent’s Tail, 2017).

Isabel Greenberg is the graphic-story contributor in the first edition, an author of three graphic novels: The Encyclopedia Of Early Earth , The One Hundred Nights Of Hero , and Glass Town. 

In Monday’s inaugural edition, her story is one titled “Confinement,” described as being about “birth and bewitchment.”

Also in the first edition:

  • Sarah Hall with a story of “a woman on the verge of a desperate act.” That one is titled “Be Good”
  • Ladee Hubbard has a story in the first edition titled “Tupperware”
  • Author Owen Booth is represented in the new magazine with “The Things They Don’t Talk About,” described as an examination of male frailty

Authors whose work is to appear in the second edition of the magazine, Lea says, include Maaza Mengiste , Tahmima Anam and Adania Shibli .

literary magazines uk

More from Publishing Perspectives on short stories is here , more on literary magazines is here , more on the United Kingdom’s publishing market is here , more on graphic fiction is here , and more on translation is here . 

More from Publishing Perspectives on the ongoing coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic is  here .

About the Author

Porter anderson.

Porter Anderson has been named International Trade Press Journalist of the Year in London Book Fair's International Excellence Awards. He is Editor-in-Chief of Publishing Perspectives. He formerly was Associate Editor for The FutureBook at London's The Bookseller. Anderson was for more than a decade a senior producer and anchor with CNN.com, CNN International, and CNN USA. As an arts critic (Fellow, National Critics Institute), he was with The Village Voice, the Dallas Times Herald, and the Tampa Tribune, now the Tampa Bay Times. He co-founded The Hot Sheet, a newsletter for authors, which now is owned and operated by Jane Friedman.

literary magazines uk

The 9 best literary magazines in the world right now

This post was published in May 2019. To stay up to date with the latest independent magazine news and reviews, sign up for our monthly email newsletter

Much as we love magazines, a pitfall of many is that the writing inside doesn’t *quite* live up to the art. To redress the balance, we decided to round up our favourite independent literary publications — magazines where the writing is beautiful, and compulsive, and where sometimes, there are no pictures at all.

We are being deliberately vague about the term “literary” here: there are traditional fiction and lit. crit magazines listed, but we’ve also included a sci-fi publication, and a psychogeography title. The only thing that really unites the magazines on this list is that every one is an exceptionally good read.

The White Review

Published in the month the UK was meant to leave the EU, the 24th issue of The White Review invokes the power of black magic. The spell-infused opening essay takes seriously the idea of the sacred, and the supernatural, defining a witch as “one who uses language to cause change in the material world”. You can read that as a statement of editorial intent, as the interviews, poetry and stories in the issue return to this idea of finding language powerful enough to save us, or to somehow cut through. One of the nicest things about The White Review is that it’s academic, and earnest, but at the same time it’s playful. There’s a wicked, witchy element to the art in this issue, too: one of our favourite spreads features a series of latex teats.

literary magazines uk

The Stinging Fly

An Irish literary magazine of new writing, the latest edition of The Stinging Fly (their 40th) received 982 submissions of short stories alone. The 14 that made the cut are tight and unusually spare. Sally Rooney is a contributing editor, and on these pages there’s an echo of her attention to the minute detail of how we see ourselves and are seen by others. In the very first story in the collection, Harpies, our narrator describes herself: “I am small, brunette, and round. I crouch next to beauties like a full stop. I accentuate.” Usually you can smell the weakness in a story — its bagginess or self-indulgence. Reading The Stinging Fly you get that delicious feeling of surrender; of being in safe hands.

literary magazines uk

Flaneur presents one street per issue, spending months living in their chosen location — most recently they moved to Taipei – before heading back to Berlin to piece the whole magazine together. They define their approach as “literary” in the sense that it is self-consciously subjective. The picture they build of a street is woven together out of scraps of private correspondence, polaroids, and half-memories. One of our favourite pieces in the last issue, which zeroes in on a street in São Paulo, tells the story of racial segregation in Brazil via a conversation overheard in a lift.

literary magazines uk

Freeman’s looks like a book but it self-defines as a magazine. “I think a magazine is tracking and engaging with culture,” explains editor John Freeman, who used to head up Granta. “It has an ongoingness, whereas an anthology freezes a moment, perhaps, and puts it in two covers.” The fifth issue is about power: it’s topical, but in a pleasurably sideways way. One of the most beautiful things here is a poem by Julia Alvarez that reimagines Penelope, happy alone, disappointed when Odysseus finally comes home: “He’s back, disguised as an old man/ to test my virtue … I would be rid of him.”

literary magazines uk

Oxford American

Self-described as ‘a magazine of the South’, the rich, difficult essays in Oxford American come as a surprise. One painful piece in the Spring ‘19 issue is about the propagandic power of plantation houses, and the architecture of white supremacy: “beauty is often a con — a lure … Think of Stalin’s symmetrical Seven Sisters. Think of Vivien Leigh’s face, that dress made of drapes.”

literary magazines uk

A science fiction magazine funded by the sale of its own delightfully 80s type-face, the first issue of Visions is all about ‘Home’. Interspersed with bright yellow pages of flash-fiction written in collaboration with a computer bot, stories are bizarre, but they also have a quiet, poetic quality. One of our favourite pieces in the issue imagines a future where the whole human race will be homeless, because we will have induced ourselves into “ultra-high frequency radiation, and shone ourselves into the depths of interstellar space”. Another highlight is a dinner-date with a hologram of F. Scott Fitzgerald.

literary magazines uk

Somesuch Stories

The fourth issue of this UK literary journal is themed ‘redemption’, a word editor Suze Olbrich defines as borderline archaic. But the idea of absolution still sticks its pins into us. In a largely secular world, we share what Olbrich calls a “gnarly yearning for liberation from guilt; for forgiveness — for salvation”. It’s a great theme, and while the stories on these pages are uneven, when they’re good, they’re very very good. Like Luke Turner’s beautiful, ambivalent essay on cruising, looking back on encounters he is now old enough to recognise as abusive. And Kieran Yates’ fan fiction about women of colour in popular culture; from Padma Patil, to Ursula from The Little Mermaid.

literary magazines uk

American Chordata

One of the defining characteristics of New York-based American Chordata is that it looks really good. Mixing short stories and poetry with photography, the pictures aren’t specially commissioned. Instead, art director Bobby Doherty mines the internet for art all year long, and then sets his favourites next to the text in a strange, non-illustrative way, almost like collage. In the most recent issue — AC’s eighth — a short story about a murderess with a twig growing out of her stomach is bookended, sensuously, by a black-and-white image of two teenagers snogging.

literary magazines uk

Zoetrope: All-Story

Founded by Francis Ford Coppola in 1997, Zoetrope was originally conceived as a way to inspire independent movie-making, by providing a space for writers to publish their short fiction and plays. The magazine’s role-call of contributors is ludicrously star-spangled — the rotating guest-designer spot has been filled by Bowie and Lynch, to name only Davids. But what makes this magazine remarkable is how lightly it wears its famous names. Virtually unknown outside literary circles, and boasting just around a thousand Instagram followers, you get the feeling the only thing its editors really care about is the quality of the fiction. Which, of course, is consistently excellent: the latest issue opens with a horrible, wonderful short story about a woman who can only get to sleep when pinned down by the weight of somebody else’s flesh.

literary magazines uk

More from Literature:

literary magazines uk

Three stories by the Chinese experimental writer Can Xue

Isolarii no.3 is a world unto itself

literary magazines uk

Inclusivity and fluidity in print

The BitterSweet Review's different interpretations of queerness

literary magazines uk

12 photographers capture the last hurrah of the plastic straw

The latest issue of Ordinary magazine focuses on the unassuming yet much-maligned object

More Roundups:

literary magazines uk

Skeuomorphic magazine design

On making magazines that look like other things

literary magazines uk

10 of the best independent magazines right now

Some of our all-time favourite magazines

literary magazines uk

Nine tasty food magazines

Fill up on our pick of today's food and drink publishing

literary magazines uk

Join our magazine club! Subscribe to Stack and every month we'll pick a different independent title and deliver it to your door. You never know what you'll get next...

Neon

The Big List of UK Poetry Publishers

You may only have heard of one or two of the larger poetry publishers in the UK, but there are actually a great many excellent small presses that producing everything from full-length collections down to short runs of beautiful hand-made chapbooks. You can find a selection of them listed below. If you’re looking to publish a book of poetry, it’s worth invesitaging them all to find the publisher that’s right for you.

If you want to suggest an addition or correction for this list, you can do so using the Big List Update Form .

Against the Grain

[ Against The Grain Website ]

An innovative, small, independent poetry publisher dedicated to publishing challenging, well-crafted poetry. They aim to produce beautiful works of art, with high production values and edgy appeal. They want their poets to be seen and heard, and they print starkly designed high-quality pamphlets and run launch events and signings to facilitate this.

Arachne Press

[ Arachne Press Website ]

This small press publishes a range of forms. Writers are encouraged to send along a short piece of work for inclusion in one of their anthologies, after which they may be invited to submit a full manuscript.

Arc Publications

[ Arc Publications Website ]

Publishes contemporary poetry from the UK and abroad, including translations. This publisher also has a music imprint. Based in Lancashire.

Artel Press

[ Artel Press Website ]

The Artel Press are a small, independent publisher and book designer founded in 2013 and based in Liverpool, UK. They specialise in short-run art, poetry and biographical titles.

Bad Betty Press

[ Bad Betty Press Website ]

An independent publishing house, based in London. They print poetry by emerging authors, and love writing that is “beautiful and bad (in the Foxy Brown sense)”. In their first year they published a series of pamphlets and an anthology on the subject of mental health.

Bloodaxe Books

[ Bloodaxe Books Website ]

Founded by Neil Astley in 1978, this is one of the UK’s most well-known poetry publishers. They have an extensive list of British and American poets, and titles published by Bloodaxe Books can be found in many bookstores.

Broken Sleep Books

[ Broken Sleep Books Website ]

Broken Sleep Books is a small, innovative press, which publishes a range of pamphlets and collections, from a range of writers. They particularly wish to encourage working-class writers, LGBTQ+, and BAME writers to submit. Politically they are left-leaning, and have no interest in misogynists, racist, sexists, or the alt-right.

Burning Eye Books

[ Burning Eye Books Website ]

Burning Eye Books is small independent publisher in the South West predominately specialising in promoting spoken word artists. They aim to dispel the assumption that performance poetry does not transfer well to page, as well as give emerging and established artist opportunities to be published. They look for the bold, the fearless and the strange, and pride themselves on providing a conscious portfolio of brilliant poets and writers.

Calder Valley Poetry

[ Calder Valley Poetry Website ]

Calder Valley Poetry is a small press which commenced publication in January 2016 with John Foggin’s collection Outlaws and Fallen Angels . It is intended to produce pamphlets by the many fine poets living alongside what was once referred to as Yorkshire’s “river of industry”.

Carcanet Press

[ Carcanet Press Website ]

A larger publisher which is home to several different poetry imprints. Publishes a diverse list of modern and classic poetry in English and in translation.

[ Dreich Website ]

DREICH is a not for profit organisation dedicated to promoting and publishing poets and poetry, It is based in Scotland, runs a grassroots community festival, and has three competitions a year to enter.

Egg Box Publishing

[ Egg Box Publishing Website ]

A small poetry publisher based in Norfolk. Produces the annual anthology of work by students on the University of East Anglia Creative Writing MA, along with a number of other titles.

[ Emma Press Website ]

The Emma Press is an award-winning independent publisher specialising in poetry, short fiction and children’s books. It was founded by Emma Dai’an Wright in Winnersh, Berkshire, in 2012 and is now based in Jewellery Quarter, Birmingham, UK.

Enitharmon Press

[ Enitharmon Press Website ]

An independent literary press that specialises in publishing poetry from both emerging and established writers. They also publish literary criticism, memoir and translations.

Erbacce Press

[ Erbacce Press Website ]

Liverpool-based Erbacce Press have been publishing poetry chapbooks for nearly 20 years. They are dedicated to ensuring that a writer is paid for their work and not charged for it to be read. They also hold a free annual poetry competition between January 1st and May Day.

Eye Flash Poetry

[ Eye Flash Poetry Website ]

Alongside Eye Flash literary magazine, this small press publishes “pocket poetry pamphlets”. These are collections of twelve poems that explore a specific theme, and which are sold online and through various independent bookshops.

[ Face Press Website ]

A poetry press based in the UK. They have published the works of leading British poets like Tom Raworth, Denise Riley, and JH Prynne, as well as the works of new poets like Imogen Cassels and Stuart Hall.

Fly on the Wall Poetry

[ Fly on the Wall Poetry Website ]

The ‘publisher with a conscience’, Fly on the Wall Press is run by Isabelle Kenyon and publishes an average of 12 books per year, with magazines and charity anthologies as ongoing social-engaged projects.

Happenstance Press

[ Happenstance Press Website ]

This publishes specialises in poetry pamphlets and first collections of UK poets. Run by Helena Nelson, the press is Scotland-based and will usually publish a couple of Scottish or Scotland-based writers each year. Also provides helpful general resources on chapbook publishing.

Hedgespoken Press

[ Hedgespoken Press Website ]

Based in Devon, this small poetry press is interested in publishing artbooks and chapbooks of prose, poetry and artwork at the intersection of myth, story, magic, and connection with the natural world & imaginal world.

Hercules Editions

[ Hercules Editions Website ]

An independent press combining poetry and prose with art and archival material, to create beautiful small books and prints. They’re based near the site of artist-poet William Blake’s last home and printing works in Hercules Road, Lambeth, which inspired their name.

Indigo Dreams

[ Indigo Dreams Website ]

Indigo Dreams is based in Devon in the beautiful southwest of England, surrounded by Cookworthy Forest and about half an hour from the North Cornwall coast and Dartmoor. They publish around 50 poetry books a year, pamphlets and full collections, as well as three poetry magazines: Reach Poetry , The Dawntreader and Sarasvati .

[ IRON Press Website ]

As publishers become more corporate, global and boring, IRON Press champions new quality writing as it has done since 1973. IRON runs events and launches; it also thinks literature is both serious and fun.

Lapwing Poetry

[ Lapwing Poetry Website ]

A small poetry press based in Belfast. Has been publishing both local and international poets for twenty years.

Onslaught Press

[ Onslaught Press Website ]

The Onslaught Press is a small, independent publishing house based in east Oxford. They put out about ten books a year. After initially intending to focus on academic monographs and picture books they have come to specialise in poetry and haiku.

Papillote Press

[ Papillote Press Website ]

Papillote Press is a publishing house specialising in books about Dominica and the wider Caribbean. They publish a range of books, both fiction and non-fiction, and hope that these books reflect the culture and literary heritage of these islands and make them known to a wider audience.

Peepal Tree Press

[ Peepal Tree Press Website ]

Peepal Tree is a wholly independent company, founded in 1985, and now publishing around 20 books a year. They have published over 300 titles, and are committed to keeping most of them in print. Their list features new writers and established voices.

Penteract Press

[ Penteract Press Website ]

Penteract Press is a publisher of experimental poetry books and chapbooks. Their focus is on exploring the structural properties of poetry. To this end, they aim to promote innovative constrained and visual poetry, as well as works that explore new uses of traditional verse forms.

Platypus Press

[ Platypus Press Website ]

A boutique publisher based in England, which seeks to unearth innovative contemporary poetry and prose, as well as other – more elaborate – literary works.

Red Squirrel Press

[ Red Squirrel Press Website ]

Red Squirrel Press is a self-funded independent press based in Scotland. It was founded in April 2006 by Sheila Wakefield and has published over 190 titles to date. It publishes poetry pamphlets and full collections. Red Squirrel Press showcases young poets such as Claire Askew and Andrew McMillan as well as more established names like James Kirkup, William Bedford, Pippa Little and James McGonigal

[ Salt Website ]

This well-established publisher produces over 80 books each year, with a focus on poetry and criticism. Publishes both international and English authors.

[ Seren Website ]

Although mainly a fiction and non-fiction publisher, this press produces several poetry books each year. Its focus is on English writing from or about Wales.

[ Shearsman Website ]

An active published or English and American poets. Originally founded as a magazine, Shearsman developed into a poetry press, and now produce around 50 books each year.

Sidekick Books

[ Sidekick Books Website ]

This tiny independent publisher puts together themed, collaborative anthologies, which are an ever-evolving platform for a plethora of styles and approaches. Submission calls are open to anyone and everyone across the world, and they particularly welcome submissions from BAME, LGBTQIA+ and disabled writers.

Smith/Doorstop

[ Smith/Doorstop Website ]

This imprint is owned by The Poetry Business. It publishes books, pamphlets, audio and ebooks. The Poetry Business also runs a number of workshops and edits the literary magazine The North .

Stairwell Books

[ Stairwell Books Website ]

Stairwell Books specialises in good writing from new writers. Though they focus on poets and writers in and around Yorkshire, they will not turn down a brilliant manuscript that deserves to be published. They have an extensive poetry and prose list as well as novels, memoirs, and biographies. Stairwell Books also publishes a literary magazine.

Templar Poetry

[ Templar Poetry Website ]

Produce a number of pamphlets every year, as well as being responsible for the publication of Iota poetry magazine.

The Black Light Engine Room

[ The Black Light Engine Room Website ]

This Middlesbrough-based press and live event series has been running since 2010. As well as publishing a literary magazine, they produce chapbooks that are high-quality both in content and appearance. Many chapbooks feature more than one poet.

The Tall-Lighthouse

[ The Tall-Lighthouse Website ]

An independent poetry business publishing full collections, pamphlets, chapbooks and anthologies of poetry. Known for publishing exciting new poets.

Valley Press

[ Valley Press Website ]

Established in 2008, Valley Press is a thriving independent publishing house based in Scarborough, North Yorkshire, UK. Representing local authors from York and Leeds, and not-so-local writers from London, Brighton, the US, Bermuda and China, they are bringing the world to Yorkshire and Yorkshire to the world.

Verve Poetry

[ Verve Poetry Website ]

A new Birmingham-based publisher dedicated to promoting and showcasing Birmingham and Midlands poetic talent in colourful and exciting ways. Aims to be not just a publisher of poetry but also an agent for poetic development in the area. Organises workshops, masterclasses, and performance and writing opportunities for younger writers.

Waterloo Press

[ Waterloo Press Website ]

Wordville Press

[ Wordville Press Website ]

Wordville is an independent imprint publishing books about the performing arts or by performing artists, with offices in London and Barcelona. Wordville Press’s book ‘Stirring Up Sheffield’ about the Crucible Theatre won the 2022 Theatre Book Prize.

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Find a home for your poems, stories, essays, and reviews by researching the publications vetted by our editorial staff and listed in the Literary Magazines database. Here you’ll find editorial policies, submission guidelines, and contact information—everything you need to determine which publications match your vision for your writing and your writing life. Use the filters below to find magazines with reading periods that are open now or opening soon (within the next thirty days), accept unsolicited submissions, and match all of your criteria for the perfect publisher of your work.

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  1. The Big List of UK Literary Magazines

    The Big List of UK Literary Magazines - Neon The Big List of UK Literary Magazines Posted on 9th January 2024 by Neon Books Literary magazines. They're strange beasts: beautiful, varied and often painfully short-lived. For poets and writers, however, they're invaluable.

  2. List of Best UK Literary Magazines for Author Submissions

    There are fiction magazines accepting short stories, poetry magazines accepting submissions and online magazines and journals. Get your writing seen by readers in these top magazines to publish your short story, flash fiction or poem. Literary magazines are one of the best routes to becoming a published author.

  3. The London Magazine

    Join our community of literature lovers and get the best of contemporary prose, poetry, and reviews today. The London Magazine is England's oldest literary periodical, with a history stretching back to 1732. Read contemporary fiction, poetry, essays and reviews.

  4. UK Litmags Great For New Writers

    Home Publishing UK litmags great for new writers UK litmags great for new writers UK-based publishers for your poetry, flash fiction, short stories and creative nonfiction The UK is home to some great literary magazines and online journals.

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    Subscribe 'This magazine is flush with tight, smart writing.' Washington Post Literary Review covers the most important and interesting books published each month, from history and biography to fiction and travel. The magazine was founded in 1979 and is based in central London.

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    Subscribe to the LRB - perfect for anyone with an interest in history, politics, literature and the arts. Place your order In Surrey Quays

  8. Literary magazines: a reading list

    Discover some of the best literary magazines from across the Anglosphere, from Granta's 40th anniversary issue to the White Review, the Stinging Fly and the New Yorker. Learn how to submit your work to different types of magazines and find out more about the Granta team's articles on literary culture.

  9. Homepage

    Litro #184: Memory edition. Issue #184, in our open call for submissions, it was memory that bubbled to the surface as an overarching theme. There was memory of past relationships, of families, of people we used to be; memories of past summers, childhoods, and the C-who-shall-not-be-named pandemic of 2020 to 2022. £16.00.

  10. Structo

    Issue 21 - First half of 2023. This issue kicks off our new digital-first format of weekly releases. Head to the issue page for the latest from Structo. Structo is an independent literary magazine. We publish short stories, poetry, interviews and essays. We often publish work in translation.

  11. About

    Literary Review covers all the latest books each month, ranging from history and biography to memoir and fiction. Each issue contains sixty-four pages of reviews from some of the leading authors, journalists, academics and thinkers in Britain in a variety of fields. It aims to reach a wide audience of readers who enjoy intelligent and accessible writing. The magazine...

  12. nb. Magazine

    A team of trustworthy readers, we curate notable books and celebrate them in our quarterly magazine and online review library. With author interviews, articles, and honest reviews from our contributors, our quarterly magazine and accompanying book subscription is the perfect literary gift for all engaged and curious readers.

  13. The best literary magazines around

    1. The White Review This quarterly arts journal published in print and online is a thing of beauty. You'll find fiction, poetry, interviews and features on literature and the arts. As well as established writers, it also features new and emerging writers and artists within its beautifully set pages.

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    The Cambridge Introduction to British Poetry, 1945-2010, 1st Edition. Cambridge University Press | 2015 | ISBN-13: 9781316426739. This book provides a broad overview of an important body of poetry from England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland from the postwar period through to the 21 st century.

  15. Submission Guidelines

    The London Magazine is the UK's oldest literary magazine, proud to have published some of the biggest names in literature including Angela Carter, Joan Didion, T. S. Eliot, Sylvia Plath, George Orwell, Jean Rhys, and Virginia Woolf. We are open to unsolicited submissions of poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and reviews for our print edition and online.

  16. The Rialto

    We have now received the results of the 2023 Nature and Place Poetry Competition back from Ian McMillan and are delighted to announce that the winners are: 1st Prize of £1000 - 'Kharkiv Zoo' - Anastasia Taylor-Lind2nd Prize of £500 - 'Spoons' - Jo Bratten3rd Prize of... read more Crow drop by Guest Blogger | Aug 30, 2022

  17. London Magazine

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  18. Best 10 UK Literary Magazines & Publications in 2024

    UK Literary Magazines Here are 10 Best UK Literary Magazines you should follow in 2024 1. Neon Literary Magazine Neon is a magazine of slipstream fiction, poetry, and artwork. We publish creative work that is fantastic or surreal, and which crosses the boundaries... more neonmagazine.co.uk 3 posts / quarter Get Email Contact 2. Structo Magazine

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    100+ Best Literary Magazines: the Only Directory You'll Need in 2024 Best Literary Magazines of 2024 Curated with love by Reedsy Search for literary magazines Getting your work published in a literary magazine can help you reach new audiences and launch your writing career.

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    In Feature Articles by Porter Anderson June 24, 2022. The new literary magazine 'Fictionable' launches June 27 with short works including graphic fiction and translation. A detail from the graphic short story 'Confinement' by Isabel Greenberg in the opening edition of the UK-based literary magazine 'Fictionable.'. Image: Provided by ...

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    The White Review Published in the month the UK was meant to leave the EU, the 24th issue of The White Review invokes the power of black magic. The spell-infused opening essay takes seriously the idea of the sacred, and the supernatural, defining a witch as "one who uses language to cause change in the material world".

  22. The Big List of UK Poetry Publishers

    Stairwell Books specialises in good writing from new writers. Though they focus on poets and writers in and around Yorkshire, they will not turn down a brilliant manuscript that deserves to be published. They have an extensive poetry and prose list as well as novels, memoirs, and biographies. Stairwell Books also publishes a literary magazine.

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    3Elements Literary Review is a quarterly, online literary journal founded in Chicago in 2013, now based in Des Moines, IA. It publishes fiction, nonfiction, poetry, art, and photography. Reading Period: Jan 1 to Dec 31 Genre: Poetry, Fiction, Creative Nonfiction Subgenres: Flash Fiction, Graphic/Illustrated, Prose Poetry 32 Poems