• Gotta Get It: Hot Tech Deals at Target
  • Hands On: Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra

Loop a PowerPoint Slide Show

  • Brock University

What to Know

  • In PowerPoint, go to Slide Show > Set Up Slide Show > Browsed at a Kiosk (Full Screen ) > OK .
  • Set the time each slide appears on the screen by selecting Slide Show > Rehearse Timings on the first slide.
  • Use Next to move to the next slide and Pause to pause recording, or type a length of time in the Slide Time box.

This article explains how to loop a PowerPoint slideshow in PowerPoint 2019, PowerPoint 2016, PowerPoint 2013, PowerPoint 2010, PowerPoint for Microsoft 365, PowerPoint 2019 for Mac, PowerPoint 2016 for Mac, and PowerPoint for Mac 2011.

How to Create a Self-Running PowerPoint Slideshow

PowerPoint slideshows are not always used by a live presenter. Slideshows set to loop continuously can run unattended in a booth or kiosk. You can even save a slideshow as a video to share.

To create a continuously looping presentation, you need to set it up and record slide timings.

To run the slideshow unattended, set timings for slide transitions and animations to run automatically.

How to Set Up the Presentation

Open the PowerPoint presentation you want to loop continuously.

Go to Slide Show .

Select Set Up Slide Show . The Set Up Show dialog box opens.

Select Browsed at a Kiosk (Full Screen) . This enables the presentation to loop continuously until the viewer presses Esc .

Select OK .

How to Rehearse and Record Timings

To ensure that your automated presentation is the right length, record timings to set the amount of time each slide appears on the screen.

PowerPoint for Mac does not have the rehearsal option. Instead, go to Transitions , choose the transition you want to use, set the duration you want, and select Apply to All .

Go to the first slide of the presentation.

Select Rehearse Timings . The slideshow starts and records the time spent on the slide. The time appears in the Slide Time box on the Recording toolbar.

Select Next on the Recording toolbar when you want to move to the next slide.

Select Pause any time you want to pause or resume recording.

Type a length of time in the Slide Time box if you want to display a slide for a specific amount of time.

Select Repeat if you want to restart the recording time for the current slide only.

Select Close when you're done recording.

You'll be asked if you want to save the new slide timings. Select Yes to save the slide timings at the end of the presentation.

If you have a microphone (built-in or external), record a voiceover on your PowerPoint presentation that plays as the slideshow loops continuously.

Get the Latest Tech News Delivered Every Day

  • How to Make a Slideshow on PowerPoint
  • Add Hyperlinks to PowerPoint Presentations
  • Tips for Memorial PowerPoint Presentations
  • Create a Wedding PowerPoint Presentation
  • How to Do a Voiceover on PowerPoint
  • How to Add Music to PowerPoint
  • Adding Sounds, Music or Narration to PowerPoint Slide Shows
  • How to Use Speaker Notes in PowerPoint
  • How to Add Audio to PowerPoint
  • Different Ways to View Slides in PowerPoint
  • Resuming Your PowerPoint Show After a Pause
  • Use Keyboard Shortcuts to Speed up PowerPoint Presentations
  • How to Change a Black-and-White Picture to Color in PowerPoint
  • Add, Delete or Change the Order of PowerPoint Slides
  • Make the Most of PowerPoint's Slide Transition Options
  • How to Print PowerPoint Slides

How-To Geek

How to loop a powerpoint presentation.

If you're showing off a lot of photos at a special event, set your presentation to progress at a continuous, automatic loop. Here's how.

Quick Links

Set up your slideshow to be looped, apply automatic slide transitions.

Slideshows are sometimes used to display images at events, such as weddings or trade shows. Whatever the occasion might be, you’ll want to loop your PowerPoint presentation so your guests aren’t staring at a blank screen. Here’s how it’s done.

First, open your PowerPoint presentation in which you would like to loop. Once open, navigate to the “Set Up” group of the “Slide Show” tab and then select the “Set Up Slide Show” button.

Set up slide show

The “Set Up Show” window will appear. In the “Show options” group, check the box next to “Loop Continuously until Esc.” Once selected, click “OK” in the bottom-right corner of the window.

Loop Continuously until Esc

Now, when you play your slideshow, it will end only when you press the “Esc” key instead of when you've finished the last slide.

Related: How to Make YouTube Videos Loop Continuously

One caveat: With the way we currently have it set up, the slideshow will proceed only when someone clicks the mouse button. That’s fine if there will be a speaker present at all times. Otherwise, you’ll need to set up automatic slide transitions.

Head back to the “Set Up Show” window by selecting “Set Up Slide Show” in the “Set Up” group of the “Slide Show” tab.

There are a couple of options you need to select, but one important note is that you must first select “Using Timings, If Present” under the “Advance Slides” group.

Use timings if present

The next option we select will lock a few things in place (which is why you need to select “Using Timings, If Present” first).

Under the “Show Type” group, select “Browsed at a Kiosk (Full Screen)." The “Loop Continuously until Esc” option will be enabled automatically if you haven’t already turned it on, and the option you’ve selected under “Advance Slides” will remain unchanged.

Select “OK” when ready to proceed.

Browsed at a kiosk

Without the “Browsed at a Kiosk” option enabled, the automatic slide progressions would be disabled if someone were to press the Back key. With it enabled, the Forward and Back keys are locked, allowing the slideshow to automatically progress unattended without fear of someone breaking it.

Now it’s time to set the timings of the slides. Head over to the “Transitions” tab. In the “Timing” group, check the box next to “After” and set the timing at which you’d like each slide to progress. Note that it doesn’t matter if the box next to “On Mouse Click” is checked or not---it won’t work.

After that, select the “Apply to All” option in the same group.

Set slide transition time

Now, when you play your slideshow, it will continuously loop without interruption. To exit the slideshow, press the “Esc” button.

How to loop a PowerPoint slideshow so that it automatically starts over as soon as it ends

  • To loop a PowerPoint slideshow, you'll need to enable looping in the "Set Up Slide Show" menu.
  • Once you set your PowerPoint to loop, it'll start over from the beginning automatically after playing the last slide.
  • Visit Business Insider's Tech Reference library for more stories .

If you've designed a Microsoft PowerPoint presentation that's meant to be viewed repeatedly, such as on a kiosk or in a museum installation, you can adjust the settings in PowerPoint so that your slideshow "loops" instead of ending after one viewing.

Getting a PowerPoint to loop is easy. Read on to find out how, using PowerPoint for both Mac and PC.

Check out the products mentioned in this article:

Microsoft office (from $149.99 at best buy), apple macbook pro (from $1,299.00 at apple), acer chromebook 15 (from $179.99 at walmart), how to loop a powerpoint presentation.

1. Open the Microsoft PowerPoint presentation that you want to loop.

2. With your PowerPoint presentation open, click on the "Slide Show" tab, then click on "Set Up Slide Show." 

3. In the pop-up window that appears, click on the box next to "Loop continuously until 'Esc'" so that a small checkmark appears inside the box. Feel free to adjust any other settings in this menu as well. Click "OK" when you're finished.

4. To test whether your PowerPoint can loop successfully, click on the "From Beginning" or "Play From Start" button in the Slide Show tab. Click through the slideshow until you reach the end. When your PowerPoint reaches its final slide, it should start over from the beginning automatically. When you're confident that looping is enabled, and you're ready to close the slide show, press the Esc key.

keep powerpoint slide show going

Related coverage from  Tech Reference :

How to add a border to slides in powerpoint, and give your slideshow a sleek design, how to embed a youtube video into your microsoft powerpoint presentations using a mac or pc, how to convert google slides to a powerpoint presentation in 4 easy steps, how to create a custom powerpoint template to use or share with others, how to copy or duplicate a powerpoint slide and put it anywhere in your slideshow.

Insider Inc. receives a commission when you buy through our links.

Watch: We compared the $1,200 MacBook Air with the $500 Surface Go, and the results were a mess

keep powerpoint slide show going

  • Main content

Avantix Learning

How to Run a PowerPoint Slide Show Automatically (Set Up a Self-Running Presentation)

Laptop in boardroom running automatic PowerPoint presentation.

Easily Create a Self-Running PowerPoint Slide Show

by Avantix Learning Team | Updated November 12, 2021

Applies to: Microsoft ®  PowerPoint ®  2013, 2016, 2019 and 365 (Windows)

You can set up self-running PowerPoint slide shows to run automatically at trade shows, conventions, events or as web-based presentations. Prior to setting up a self-running presentation, you'll need to apply your preferred animations to text and objects as well as any slide transitions to be be included in the show (unless specified otherwise in the Set Up Show dialog box). When you create automatic slide shows, you also have the option of including specific slide timings, narrations or voice over and ink annotations.

Recommended article: How to Draw on PowerPoint Slides on the Fly During a Presentation (Using Ink)

Do you want to learn more about PowerPoint? Check out our virtual classroom or in-person PowerPoint courses >

Setting up a self-running presentation

When you set up a self-running presentation, you can choose 3 options in the Set Up Show dialog box depending on your audience:

PowerPoint dialog box to set up slide show.

To set up a PowerPoint presentation to run automatically, but allow those watching the slide show to have control over when they advance slides:

  • Click the Slide Show tab in the Ribbon and then click Set Up Slide Show. A dialog box appears.
  • Under Show type, select Presented by a speaker (full screen). This is the default setting for slide shows.

To set up a presentation to run automatically, but those watching the slide show do NOT have control over when slides advance:

  • Under Show type, select Browsed by an individual (window).

To set up a presentation to run automatically, but those watching the slide show do NOT have control over when slides advance and the presentation repeats until the people watching press Escape (ESC):

  • Under Show type, select Browsed at kiosk (full screen).

Setting slide timings manually

You can choose to rehearse slide timings or you can manually set the slide timings for your PowerPoint slides using the Transitions tab in the Ribbon.

To set slide timings manually:

  • Click the View tab in the Ribbon and then click Slide Sorter.
  • Select the slide for which you want to set timing.
  • Click the Transitions tab in the Ribbon.
  • In the Timing group, under Advance Slide, select the After check box and then enter the number of seconds indicating how long the slide should appear on the screen. If you want the next slide to appear either when you click the mouse or automatically after the number of seconds that you enter (whichever comes first), select both the On Mouse Click and the After check boxes.
  • Repeat the process for each slide for which you want to set timing.

Rehearsing and recording slide timings

If you choose Browsed by an individual (window) or Browsed at a kiosk (full screen) in the Set Up Show dialog box, you can rehearse and record timings for animations, transitions and advancing slides.

To rehearse timings, you'll use the Rehearsal toolbar shown below:

PowerPoint Rehearsal toolbar to rehearse timings.

The toolbar includes the following buttons from left to right:

  • Next (advance to next slide)
  • Total presentation time

Click the buttons in the Rehearsal toolbar to perform the following actions:

  • Click Next to advance to the next slide.
  • To temporarily stop recording the time, click Pause.
  • To restart recording the time after pausing, click Pause.
  • To set an exact length of time for a slide to appear, type the length of time in the Slide Time box.
  • To restart recording the time for the current slide, click Repeat.

To rehearse timings:

  • Click the Slide Show tab in the Ribbon and then click Rehearse Timings. The Rehearsal toolbar appears and the timer begins immediately. The presentation appears in full screen recording mode.
  • Click the desired buttons. Click Next to advance to the next slide or press the right arrow on your keyboard. To temporarily stop recording the time, click Pause. To restart recording the time after pausing, click Pause. To set an exact length of time for a slide to appear, type the length of time in the Slide Time box. To restart recording the time for the current slide, click Repeat.
  • Continue clicking on the appropriate buttons until you are satisfied with the timings. The total presentation time appears on the top right of the Rehearsal toolbar.
  • After you set the time for the last slide, a dialog box displays the total time for the presentation and another dialog box appears.
  • To keep the recorded slide timings, click Yes. To discard the recorded slide timings, click No.

The presentation appears. If you view the presentation in Slide Sorter View, the slide timing is displayed below each slide.

Recording a slide show with timings

Instead of using the Rehearse Timings button, you can record timings (and narrations or voice over) as you record a show. The Record Slide Show button appears on the Slide Show tab in the Ribbon. When you record a slide show, you can start from the beginning or the current slide:

PowerPoint Record Slide Show button on Ribbon.

After you choose to record a slide show, you will have the option of including slide and animation timings as well as narrations, ink, and laser pointer (2010 users will not have the option of recording ink annotations):

Record Slide Show dialog box in PowerPoint.

If you select Slide and animation timings, PowerPoint automatically records the time you spend on each slide, including animations and triggers on each slide. If you have already rehearsed timings, they will be replaced.

If you use the pen, highlighter, eraser or laser pointer, those will also be recorded. Pen, highlighter, and eraser recording are available only if you have PowerPoint 2013 (and run updates) or a later version of PowerPoint. In earlier versions of PowerPoint, pen and highlighter strokes are saved as ink annotation shapes. To learn more about including ink, check out the article  How to Draw on PowerPoint Slides on the Fly During a Presentation (Using Ink) .

To record a slide show and include animations and timings:

  • Click the Slide Show tab in the Ribbon and then click the arrow beside Record Slide Show. A drop-down menu appears.
  • Select Start Recording from Beginning or Start Recording from Current Slide. A dialog box appears.
  • Select the option to include slide and animation timings.
  • Click Start Recording. The Rehearsal toolbar appears and the timer begins immediately. The presentation appears in full screen recording mode.
  • If you want to record timings, click the desired buttons. Click Next to advance to the next slide or press the right arrow on your keyboard. To temporarily stop recording the time, click Pause. To restart recording the time after pausing, click Pause. To set an exact length of time for a slide to appear, type the length of time in the Slide Time box. To restart recording the time for the current slide, click Repeat.
  • To end your recording at any time, right-click on a slide and select End Show from the menu.

The presentation appears. In Slide Sorter view, the slide timing is displayed below each slide.

Recording narrations or voice over

In addition to timings, you may want to add narrations or voice over. You can record narrations before you run a presentation or you can record narrations during a presentation and include audience comments. When you add narrations, PowerPoint automatically records your slide timings. Alternatively, you can set the slide timings first. Be sure to test the microphone first. If you do not want narrations throughout your entire presentation, you can record separate sounds or comments on selected slides or objects.

To record narrations, your computer requires a sound card, microphone, speakers and a webcam (optionally). You will also need a microphone connector if the microphone is not part of your computer.

It's not a bad idea to create a script first in Microsoft Word to improve flow and avoid filler words such as "um". You may also want to practice before recording although you can always re-record narration.

To record a slide show with narrations:

  • In the Record Slide Show dialog box, select the check box for Narrations and laser pointer and, if required, select or deselect the Slide and animation timings check box.
  • Click Start Recording. A Rehearsal toolbar appears.
  • Speak into the microphone to record a narration.
  • To pause the narration, in the Rehearsal toolbar, click Pause. To resume the narration, click Resume Recording.
  • To end your slide show recording at any rime, right-click on the slide and then select End Show.

The recorded slide show timings and narrations are saved. If you view the presentation in Slide Sorter view, timings appear beneath each slide. A sound icon also appears in the lower-right corner of each slide that has narration.

If you re-record your narration (including audio, ink, and laser pointer), PowerPoint erases your previously recorded narration (including audio, ink, and laser pointer) when you start recording again on the same slide.

To use ink, eraser, or the laser pointer during your recording, right-click on the slide, select Pointer options and choose the laser pointer, pen, highlighter or eraser. Ink is not available for 2010 users. If you want to display a laser pointer while you're recording, press Control and your pointer will appear as a small red circle on your screen.

Previewing narration

If you want to listen to the narration on a slide:

  • In Normal View, click the sound icon in the lower-right corner of the slide.
  • Click Play.

Running a recorded slide show

To run a recorded slide show in Normal View:

  • If necessary, on the Slide Show tab in the Ribbon, click Set Up Slide Show. A dialog box appears.
  • Under Show type, select the desired option.
  • On the Slide Show tab, click From Beginning or From Current Slide. During playback, your animations, inking actions, laser pointer, audio and video play in sync.
  • To end the show, press Escape.

Turning timings or narrations off

You can turn off timings and narrations and then turn them on again at any time.

To turn off recorded slide timings, on the Slide Show tab, deselect the Use Timings check box.

To turn off recorded narrations, ink, and the laser pointer, on the Slide Show tab, deselect the Play Narrations check box.

Options in PowerPoint Ribbon to turn off narrations or timings.

Deleting timings or narration

You can use the Clear command to permanently delete timings or narration from your slide show recording. You have 4 options:

  • Delete timings on the current slide
  • Delete timings on all slides
  • Delete narration on the current slide
  • Delete narration on all slides

To clear timings or narrations:

  • On the Slide Show tab, click the arrow below Record Slide Show. A menu appears.
  • Select Clear and then the appropriate clear option.

Once you have recorded a presentation, you can later save it as a video if you'd like.

Subscribe to get more articles like this one

Did you find this article helpful? If you would like to receive new articles, join our email list.

More resources

A Beginner's Guide to Video Formats in PowerPoint

How to Hide and Unhide Slides in PowerPoint (with Shortcuts)

How to Insert Video in PowerPoint (from a File on Your PC or a Shared Drive)

PowerPoint Keyboard Shortcuts to Play and Control Video During a Slide Show

How to Add Animation in PowerPoint (Animate Images, Text and Other Objects)

Related courses

Microsoft PowerPoint: Intermediate / Advanced

Microsoft PowerPoint: Design for Non-Designers

Microsoft PowerPoint: Animations Bootcamp

Microsoft Excel: Intermediate / Advanced

VIEW MORE COURSES >

Our instructor-led courses are delivered in virtual classroom format or at our downtown Toronto location at 18 King Street East, Suite 1400, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (some in-person classroom courses may also be delivered at an alternate downtown Toronto location). Contact us at [email protected] if you'd like to arrange custom instructor-led virtual classroom or onsite training on a date that's convenient for you.

Copyright 2024 Avantix ® Learning

You may also like

10 Keyboard Shortcuts in PowerPoint's Outline View

10 Keyboard Shortcuts in PowerPoint's Outline View

The outline has been an integral part of Microsoft PowerPoint for many years. It is dynamically linked to slide placeholders and is organized in a hierarchical way.

How to Change the Thumbnail for a Video in PowerPoint (using the Poster Frame Tool)

How to Change the Thumbnail for a Video in PowerPoint (using the Poster Frame Tool)

If you have inserted a video on a PowerPoint slide, you can display a custom thumbnail (or Poster Frame) for the video during a slide show. The thumbnail will display when you run a PowerPoint slide show and disappears when you start the video. For most videos, the thumbnail that displays is the first frame of the video clip. You can use the Poster Frame command to display a different frame in the video clip or a picture from another source as a thumbnail. A picture thumbnail could be either an image or an icon.

How to Use the Built-in Laser Pointer in PowerPoint (with Shortcuts)

How to Use the Built-in Laser Pointer in PowerPoint (with Shortcuts)

During a PowerPoint slide show, you can change your mouse into a laser pointer to focus attention on a specific area on your slide. You can show or hide the built-in laser pointer using keyboard shortcuts or by using the context menu.

Microsoft, the Microsoft logo, Microsoft Office and related Microsoft applications and logos are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in Canada, US and other countries. All other trademarks are the property of the registered owners.

Avantix Learning |18 King Street East, Suite 1400, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5C 1C4 | Contact us at [email protected]

How to Run a PowerPoint Slide Show Automatically (Set Up a Self-Running Presentation)

Our Courses

Avantix Learning courses are offered online in virtual classroom format or as in-person classroom training. Our hands-on, instructor-led courses are available both as public scheduled courses or on demand as a custom training solution.

All Avantix Learning courses include a comprehensive course manual including tips, tricks and shortcuts as well as sample and exercise files.

VIEW COURSES  >

Contact us at  [email protected]  for more information about any of our courses or to arrange custom training.

Privacy Overview

Pin it on pinterest.

  • Print Friendly

My Microsoft Office Tips

  • PowerPoint Tips
  • Office Tips
  • Privacy Policy
  • Submit Guest Post

How to Loop a PowerPoint Presentation Continuously

Want your PowerPoint presentation to loop continuously? Thus it can run unattended in a booth or kiosk, you do even need a live presenter. This is common when you are creating a display in a store, or for a trade show or convention. In this post, let’s learn how to keep on showing the slides over and over.

1. Open your PPT presentation and go to Transitions tab. Choose one you prefer in the Transition to This Slide group.

How to Loop a PowerPoint Presentation Continuously

2. In Timing group, uncheck the box of On Mouse Click (It means to wait until a mouse click to move to the next slide), and enter the value in the box of After . (It means to move the next slide after a certain number of seconds).

How to Loop a PowerPoint Presentation Continuously

3. Then go to Slide Show tab, find Set Up group and click Set Up Slide Show .

How to Loop a PowerPoint Presentation Continuously

4. The Set Up Show dialog box will display, choose the Show type according to your actual needs. While under Show options , check the box of Loop continuously until ‘Esc’ . What’s more, you can select to loop all slide or just some specified of them, which you can customize the page numbers. Do not forget to click OK to save the settings.

How to Loop a PowerPoint Presentation Continuously

One response to “How to Loop a PowerPoint Presentation Continuously”

Thank you for sharing with us, I believe this website truly stands out : D.

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Copyright © 2019 My Microsoft Office Tips All Rights Reserved   

keep powerpoint slide show going

  • PowerPoint Themes
  • Latest PowerPoint Templates
  • Best PowerPoint Templates
  • Free PowerPoint Templates
  • Simple PowerPoint Templates
  • PowerPoint Backgrounds
  • Project Charter
  • Project Timeline
  • Project Team
  • Project Status
  • Market Analysis
  • Marketing Funnel
  • Market Segmentation
  • Target Customer
  • Marketing Mix
  • Digital Marketing Strategy
  • Resource Planning
  • Recruitment
  • Employee Onboarding
  • Company Profile
  • Mission Vision
  • Meet The Team
  • Problem & Solution
  • Business Model
  • Business Case
  • Business Strategy
  • Business Review
  • Leadership Team
  • Balance Sheet
  • Income Statement
  • Cash Flow Statement
  • Executive Summary
  • 30 60 90 Day Plan
  • SWOT Analysis
  • Flow Charts
  • Gantt Charts
  • Text Tables
  • Infographics
  • Google Slides Templates
  • Presentation Services
  • Ask Us To Make Slides
  • Data Visualization Services
  • Business Presentation Tips
  • PowerPoint Tutorials
  • Google Slides Tutorials
  • Presentation Resources

SlideUpLift

How To Loop A PowerPoint Slideshow? Detailed Guide

This Blog explains the methods to loop your presentation slideshows in detail. It covers all the techniques to create slideshow loops for PowerPoint as well as Google Slides presentations. We have also included tips to enhance your presentation slideshows.

How To Loop A PowerPoint Slideshow? Detailed Guide

Microsoft PowerPoint is a popular application for creating and delivering presentations. PowerPoint has numerous options for adding flair and taking your presentations a notch higher, such as the ability to incorporate YouTube videos, GIFs, etc. If you loop your PowerPoint, every slide will display for a predetermined duration. After the presentation, it will automatically resume from the beginning.

But the question is, can you use the looping function effectively? When used correctly, this feature eliminates the need for presenters to click a mouse or computer key to transition between slides. This feature is easy to set up and customize.

Image shows How To Loop A PowerPoint Slideshow

Today’s guide will teach us how to loop a PowerPoint slideshow and various tips and tricks for effective looping.

Why You Need to Loop Your Slideshow in PowerPoint?

Before learning how to loop a PowerPoint slideshow, let’s see under what scenarios one needs to loop their slideshow:

One helpful tool in PowerPoint that helps to guarantee a smooth and continuous presentation experience is the ability to loop your slideshow. The constant playback draws and maintains audience attention whether you present information in automated presentations, build interactive kiosks, or show information in exhibitions. Looping makes it possible to communicate information effectively and reinforce essential points for audience members who might join the presentation at different times. 

How to Make a PowerPoint Loop?

You can learn how to make a PowerPoint loop through the instructions below. You can use the loop for various events, such as trade exhibitions, information displays, or kiosks.

  • Open the PowerPoint presentation that you wish to loop first.
  • Go to the Slide Show Tab: The PowerPoint window has several tabs at the top. To access choices relating to presenting your slides, select the “Slide Show” tab.
  • Access Setup Show: Several commands and choices are under the “Slide Show” tab. Search for the “Set Up Slide Show” button or menu item in the group labeled “Start Slide Show.” Click on it.
  • Display Type: Select “Presented by a speaker (full screen).”
  • Preview slides: If you want the slides to play automatically, select “Manually” or enter the desired duration for each slide’s PowerPoint presentation loop timing.
  • Enable your presentation to loop indefinitely unless you manually end it by hitting the Escape (‘Esc’) key by enabling this option.
  • Click OK: After adjusting these settings to store your options, click the “OK” button.
  • Begin Your Loop: Your slides will be set to loop unless you manually stop it by pressing the ‘Esc’ key. To stop it, click “From Beginning” or “From Current Slide” under the “Slide Show” tab to begin your presentation.

How to Loop a PowerPoint SlideShow from Selected Slides

You can choose which slides you want to loop around in PowerPoint. Eliminating manual intervention and maintaining audience interaction can be achieved by carefully choosing which slides to show throughout the presentation. Follow these steps to learn how to loop a PowerPoint slideshow from selected slides: 

  • Select the “Slide Show” option to start a loop for a particular set of slides. To initiate the loop, click the first slide in the thumbnail pane on the left.
  • Click the final slide you wish to add to the loop while holding your keyboard’s “Shift” key. Next, select “Setup Show” and turn on the looping feature.
  • Choose the “Custom Show” option and give it a name in the “Set Up Show” dialogue box. Navigate to the “Slide Show” menu and select “Custom Slide Show” to begin your looping presentation from the selected slides.

How to Set Up Auto-Loop for Continuous Playback

Now you know how to loop a slideshow in PowerPoint from selected slides, let us see how you can set up auto-loop for continuous playback: 

  • Select the Slide Show tab.
  • Press the Set Up Slide Show button. You’ll see an options window appear.
  • Keep clicking Loop till you reach “Esc.”

Note: Under Show Type, select Presented by a speaker or Browsed by an individual if you want the speaker or individual to continue controlling the presentation and clicking between slides. Clicking “Browsed” at a kiosk checks the Loop until the “Esc” box appears continuously. Moreover, auto-looping may annoy your viewers if your presentation is very repetitive. Use it with discretion and only when it makes sense for your writing subject.

How to Loop A PowerPoint SlideShow Using 2007 Version (older versions).

Use these detailed instructions to loop your slides if you’re using an older version of Microsoft PowerPoint:

  • Open your PowerPoint presentation on your 2007 Microsoft PowerPoint .
  • Select the tab labeled Slide Show. Select the “Set Up Slide Show” option from the “Set Up” menu.
  • Go to the “Show options” section and select “Loop continuously until ‘Esc'” from the dialogue box that appears. Click Ok.
  • Select your initial slide from the “Slides” preview side panel. To select your final slide, press and hold Shift. 
  • Select the tab labeled “Animations.” Turn off “On Mouse Click” and check the “Automatically After” box.
  • The “After” box in the “Timing” panel has up and down arrows that you can use to change the time each slide appears. It will automatically loop back to the first slide when your slideshow reaches the last one.

How to Stop or Pause your Slideshow loop at any point.

Learning how to make a PowerPoint loop is of no use if you don’t know how to stop or pause your slideshow loop at any point: 

You can use simple keyboard commands to pause or stop your slideshow loop at any time during a PowerPoint presentation. You can manually stop the looping slideshow by hitting the “Esc” key (also known as the Escape key) on your keyboard. It gives presenters a simple and quick option to stop the continuous playback so they can answer queries, have conversations, or go to particular slides that are not playing continuously.

Advanced Techniques for Creating a Seamless Loop in PowerPoint

One of the techniques used for creating a seamless loop in PowerPoint is incorporating videos and GIFs. PowerPoint’s animations, transitions, and triggers can create seamless looping. Here is how:

  • Select the video you imported and added to a slide.
  • Open the “Animations” tab from the main menu.
  • Choose “Play” from the animation gallery’s “Media” section after clicking the “ Add Animation ” button.
  • On the right side of the screen, click the “Animation Pane” to open it.
  • Right-click the “Play” button and choose “Timing” in the “Animation Pane.”
  • Choose “Until End of Slide” or “Until Next Click” as the “Repeat” option in the “Timing” tab.
  • Use Triggers to adjust the start and stop times of the video.

Tips and Tricks for Effective Slideshow Looping in PowerPoint

As you can see, creating a PowerPoint loop video couldn’t be easier. It only takes three easy steps to complete. Nonetheless, there are always specific tips you may apply to improve the appeal and attention-grabbingness of your videos.

Explains Tips For Effective Slideshow Looping in PowerPoint

1. Selecting the Right Video

The length and content of the video are the primary considerations when discussing the “right” video. Therefore, consider the duration of your video when creating a continuous loop.

Yes, longer videos can be more captivating, but they may add to the presentation’s file size and degrade performance. Shorter video clips, however, are less likely to affect performance and can loop more naturally. Regarding the video’s substance, make sure it supports the main idea of your presentation and is pertinent to the subject of your talk. The video aims to increase viewer comprehension and engagement without becoming overbearing or intrusive.

2. Compressing Video Files

Large videos can detract from the overall image of your presentation by making it excessively slow and challenging to share. Therefore, consider using a specialized video compression tool or the built-in PowerPoint compression feature to optimize your presentation by compressing the files. It doesn’t always imply that your presentation will look grainy. Still, it can cause a noticeable quality loss, so keep that in mind when creating the presentation in the first place.

3. Examining the Presentation

Make sure the video loops accurately and smoothly by testing it before you deliver your presentation. Go over the entire presentation, looking for any inconsistent or problematic playback. If you complete your testing on time, you can safely make all the required changes and retest it until the loop video functions as planned.

4. Looping Videos to Create Ambience and Background

You can also use videos that loop to set the mood for your presentation. For instance, a natural setting or a soft animation can produce an aesthetically pleasing and captivating ambiance. Nevertheless, the presentation’s general subject and the background clip are complementary rather than distracting.

To sum up, looping your PowerPoint slideshow is simple. PowerPoint’s “Set Up Slide Show options” allow you to program it to loop indefinitely for a predetermined number of times.

Use transitions carefully, arrange your slides in the correct order, and adhere to best practices while making your looping PowerPoint to give it a polished, professional appearance. Your looping slideshow can operate flawlessly at events without supervision with the correct settings.

How to Loop Slideshow In Powerpoint?

To loop a slideshow in PowerPoint, go to the “Slide Show” tab, select “Set Up Slide Show,” check “Loop continuously until ‘Esc’,” and click “OK.”

Can I loop specific slides within my PowerPoint presentation?

Yes, PowerPoint allows you to loop specific slides.

How do I stop or pause a looped slideshow in PowerPoint?

To interrupt a looped slideshow at any point, simply press the “Esc” key on your keyboard.

Can I customize the duration of each slide in a looped PowerPoint presentation?

Yes, you can control the timing of each slide by adjusting the slide transition settings, allowing for a tailored and dynamic looping experience.

Can SlideUpLift templates be used in looped presentations?

Yes, SlideUpLift provides PowerPoint templates that are compatible with looped presentations. These professionally designed templates can enhance the visual appeal of your slides, making your looped presentation more engaging and impactful.

Table Of Content

Related presentations.

Business Review PowerPoint Template

Business Review PowerPoint Template

Business Case PowerPoint Deck Template

Business Case PowerPoint Deck Template

Project Status Review Deck Template

Project Status Review Deck Template

Related blogs.

10 Bad PowerPoint Slides Examples to Avoid

10 Bad PowerPoint Slides Examples to Avoid

10 Best Animated PowerPoint Templates

10 Best Animated PowerPoint Templates

10 Best Business PowerPoint Templates for Presentations

10 Best Business PowerPoint Templates for Presentations

10 Best Free PowerPoint Templates

10 Best Free PowerPoint Templates

Tags and categories, privacy overview.

Necessary cookies are absolutely essential for the website to function properly. This category only includes cookies that ensures basic functionalities and security features of the website. These cookies do not store any personal information

Any cookies that may not be particularly necessary for the website to function and is used specifically to collect user personal data via ads, other embedded contents are termed as non-necessary cookies. It is mandatory to procure user consent prior to running these cookies on your website.

VEGA SLIDE

How to Make PowerPoint Start Again After End

Usually, after the presentation ends, PowerPoint will show a blank slide citing “end of slide show, click to exit”. This kind of display may look awful and not supposed to be there.

You can trick this issue by displaying the first slide right after the last slide . It could remind your audience about the main topic of the presentation you have presented at the beginning.

There is a setting in Microsoft PowerPoint to create a looping effect after the presentation ended. The setting is hidden and not well known, but it’s always good to implement.

How to make PowerPoint slide loop

1. Go to the Slide Show menu.

keep powerpoint slide show going

2. Click on the Set Up Slide Show.

keep powerpoint slide show going

3. Check the Loop continuously until ‘Esc’ and click OK .

keep powerpoint slide show going

4. Check the result by enabling Slide Show (F5).

keep powerpoint slide show going

5. Save your file (CTRL+S) once everything is done.

keep powerpoint slide show going

Love the template? Get Curvy SWOT with Circular Image PowerPoint Template for FREE now!

The slide show can only be closed by pressing the Esc button or Right-click > End Show . This setting is only applied to the PowerPoint file you are using. It won’t affect other presentation files.

In addition, it best to set up an animation or transition for the first slide to create a seamless effect at the end of the presentation.

About The Author

Related posts, how to make bullet points appear at once in powerpoint.

keep powerpoint slide show going

How to Export High-Resolution Images from PowerPoint 2024

keep powerpoint slide show going

PowerPoint 2000: Changing the Appearance of Slides

keep powerpoint slide show going

Free Ways to Wrap Text Around an Image in PowerPoint

keep powerpoint slide show going

Keep slides updated

In PowerPoint for Microsoft 365 on Windows or Mac you can choose to have any changes made while you're presenting synchronized to your slide show. This is useful if you have coauthors who are making last-minute changes and you want to make sure those changes get incorporated into the presentation.

Note:  This only applies to presentations stored on OneDrive or SharePoint.

To configure this setting go to the Slide Show tab of the ribbon, select Set Up Slide Show , and in the Show options group you'll find Keep slides updated .

The Show options group of Set Up Slide Show with Keep slides updated enabled.

If you're already in your presentation and you want to turn slide syncing on (or off) select the More slide show options button in Presenter view and you'll find the option on the context menu.

The More slide show options menu, showing Keep Slides Updated selected.

Start the presentation and see your notes in Presenter view

Work together on PowerPoint presentations

Facebook

Need more help?

Want more options.

Explore subscription benefits, browse training courses, learn how to secure your device, and more.

keep powerpoint slide show going

Microsoft 365 subscription benefits

keep powerpoint slide show going

Microsoft 365 training

keep powerpoint slide show going

Microsoft security

keep powerpoint slide show going

Accessibility center

Communities help you ask and answer questions, give feedback, and hear from experts with rich knowledge.

keep powerpoint slide show going

Ask the Microsoft Community

keep powerpoint slide show going

Microsoft Tech Community

keep powerpoint slide show going

Windows Insiders

Microsoft 365 Insiders

Was this information helpful?

Thank you for your feedback.

PowerPoint Tips Blog

Helping you with presenting, PowerPoint, and speaking

Keep your screen alive during presentations to avoid embarrassing hibernation mode

October 4, 2011 by Ellen Finkelstein 17 Comments

Have you ever started a presentation, gotten into a discussion with your audience, and found that your laptop went into hibernation because you stopped moving the mouse? It has happened to me and it’s embarrassing!

It looks as dead as a doornail!

Mouse Jiggler to the rescue!

Enter Mouse Jiggler . This little program simulates jiggling the mouse, so your laptop doesn’t go to sleep. It even has a “Zen” mode that does the jiggling virtually, that is, invisibly.

The only disadvantage is that there is apparently no way to actually close the program after you minimize it, at least in Windows 7. You have to go to the Task Manager (press Ctrl-Alt-Del and choose Start Task Manager), select Mouse Jiggler on the Applications tab, and click End Task.

Presentation View in Windows Vista and 7

Thanks to Matthew Trump who reminded me about Presentation View in Windows Vista and 7. (Apparently, it isn’t available in Windows 7 Starter, Home Basic or Home Premium editions.)

Presentation View keeps your computer awake, turns off system notifications (but not notifications from your software like Outlook, Skype, or IM), and lets you turn off your screensaver as well as change the wallpaper (in case you have a photo there that you don’t want your audience to see).

To go into Presentation View, press the Windows key + X to open the Mobility Center. You can simply click the Turn On button in the Presentation Settings section. To change the settings, click the Projector icon.

By default, the Windows Mobility Center feature is only available on laptops, notebooks, and tablet PCs. (You can enable it on desktop computers, but this requires editing the Windows Registry.)

Do you find yourself jiggling the mouse to avoid your laptop going into hibernation?

Related posts:

  • Black out the screen and other delivery tips
  • Turn off pop-ups when presenting
  • Don’t look at the screen!
  • 3 things you must avoid when delivering a presentation to a live audience

17 Leave a Reply

avatar

It is easier to adjust the time for the screen saver (via the configuration screen) and set it to 9999 minutes.

Matthew

Even easier: Use the Winkey and X to set presentation mode to on. This will stop hibernation, system pop ups and allow you to set a neutral background.

http://richfrombechtle.wordpress.com/2009/06/04/windows-7-presentation-mode/

Tripp Frohlichstein

If using a Mac, there is a free program on the Mac App store called Caffeine and it works great. Won’t let your computer go to sleep.

Ginger Marks

Ronald’s tip is the way to go. It is the way I deal with this issue. Costs nothing but a teensy bit of brain power and time to remember to set it.

Too bad I left this tip out of my recently revised book, Presentational Skills for the Next Generation.

Ginger Marks

Walter

I’m not sure I consider this embarassing; I think it’s more likely good practice. Maybe I’m old school, but I learned with an overhead projector and the idea of “visual aids.” If the visual is no longer aiding, it’s a distraction and may be competing with the the speaker (or in this example discussion). I’m not the only instructor I know who blanks the screen during discussion and Q & A.

Of course I also turn the TV off (not just the sound) when company comes to visit.

Ellen

Walter, I agree that it’s a good practice to blank out the screen (and turn off the TV when company comes–unless they’re coming to watch the Super Bowl!). This happens to me when I haven’t planned it. Someone in the audience asks a questions and I just get involved in answering and the discussion that ensues.

Simon

Good Lord! Whatever happened to using the B key?!!?!?

Caj

To Ronald: it is just not always possible to change the time for the screen saver. My previous company used rather tight rules what could be changed and what not.

So some cafeine (there is a windows version as well) came very practical.

Aileen

Seriously? Right click desktop Select Personalize Select Screen Saver Select Change Power Settings Select When Computer Sleeps Set this to Never I have never had a system nod off when giving a presentation. With today’s monitors using a screen saver is a choice not a necessity. I have not used one in years, my laptop computer is never turned off between uses and I have never had a problem because I was not using a screen saver.

Philippe

This is ridiculous !!

99% of all people looking for this topic are working in enterprises, where GPO settings prevent them from changing screensaver settings (and this btw disables the mentioned option in the mobility center, as well !!).

This is of absolutely no help….

In that situation, you need to contact your IT Department. This is for people who can change settings themselves. That’s a lot more than 1% of people.

EricE

What I don’t understand is why there aren’t two additional GPO’s:

1) Let Presentation mode override the general screen saver GPO 2) Only allow presentation mode to be active for X continuous minutes

That way administrators can provide for basic security needs (unattended machines are secured) while allowing users to accommodate business requirements by using presentation mode, with there being a failsafe if the user forgets to turn presentation mode off when they are done (or tries to use it to bypass security policy, but I do try to give people the benefit of the doubt).

oscar

My problem on my notebook pro is during the presentation, it goes off presentation and then comes back on again or hangs. Not really the screensaver problem, but most embarrassing during a presentation.

Any suggestions?

Ellen Finkelstein

It might be something with your specific laptop, but be sure you keep it plugged in (bring an extension cord if necessary) and check the Power settings. What do you mean by “goes off presentation?” Does PowerPoint go back to Normal view? Or does it seem like a graphic card / power issue?

WFP

You can try Coffee_FF to keep computer awake…

Mike

Hello Ellen, My challenge is that, while presenting, the screen goes off the Slide show view back to the Normal view and I’ll have to touch the mouse before it returns to the Slide show view for me to continue with the presentation! Any suggestions on how to resolve this, please?

Kristopher Aken

Très bien, j’aime beaucoup !!

wpdiscuz

A collage of colorful PowerPoint designs organized into tidy rows

5 golden rules of PowerPoint design

february 6, 2024

A smiling woman with blonde hair, glasses, and a leopard print cardigan poses with her hands on her hips in front of an olive green background.

by Deb Ashby

Wondering how to design the perfect PowerPoint presentation? It's easier than you think–just follow five simple rules to get started:

1. Consider using templates

When building a slide deck, it’s important to maintain consistency throughout. We want to ensure we are using consistent font styles, colors and themes. This can be tricky when designing from scratch, so why not start from a template?

Microsoft Create contains hundreds of pre-made, customizable PowerPoint templates, which means you don’t have to start from scratch and the fonts and colors are already set for you.

Simply choose a template from the gallery, customize it as needed, and you are done!

Screenshots of slides in a branded PowerPoint presentation, in hues of navy, maroon, and brown.

2. No walls of text

We’ve all seen PowerPoint presentations where slides contain too much text. The human brain struggles to listen and read at the same time. If you are presenting to an audience, keep the text on slides to a minimum.

Consider employing the “5-5-5" rule. No more than 5 lines, no more than 5 words, no more than 5 minutes. Think short and sharp memory joggers instead of rambling paragraphs.

Where possible, consider replacing text with visuals to represent your point. People remember images more than words.

A minimalist, black and white PowerPoint template

3. Be mindful of colors and fonts

No one wants their audience to leave with a headache after an hour of straining to read slides. We need to ensure that our presentation is easy to read for everyone – even for those in the nosebleed seats at the back! Think about the font you are using. Is it appropriate for the presentation? What about the font size? Can people at the back easily read? What about people with visual impairment? Ensure all text is at least 24pts.

When it comes to color, ensure all slides have good contrast. Dark backgrounds should have light font and vice versa.

4. Use animation sparingly

Animation can really liven up an otherwise flat presentation. However, it should be used thoughtfully and sparingly. Too much of the wrong type of animation with objects flying in and zooming around the screen, while fun, can look confusing and unprofessional.

Animation should be subtle. With every animation you add, ask yourself, "Is this going to enhance my presentation or distract from it?"

5. Engage your audience

When presenting to an audience, there is usually an awkward time before the presentation begins while the speaker waits for everyone to arrive. During this time, people may start scrolling on their phones or get distracted with work emails, and it can be hard to pull the audience back.

To avoid this issue, work to grab your audience's attention before the presentation even starts. Instead of just having the title slide on the screen, consider creating "kiosk slides." These are a series of slides that contain a combination of interesting things for the audience to look at or engage with. Maybe you have an interesting image? A funny quote or fun facts? Or maybe there is a question you want them to think about prior to the session?

Create these slides and have them automatically cycle round before the presentation starts.

A PowerPoint presentation for a whitepaper proposal.

Related topics

Is Iceland entering a new volcanic era?

  • Published 10 February

This video can not be played

To play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.

Watch: Dramatic aerials show fast lava spread after Iceland eruption

This week, Iceland woke up to yet another day of fire, as towering fountains of lava lit up the dark morning sky.

This time the evacuated town of Grindavik was spared, but the molten rock still wreaked havoc - engulfing a pipe that provides heat and hot water to thousands living in the area and cutting off a road to the Blue Lagoon tourist attraction.

It is the third short-lived eruption on the Reykjanes peninsula since December 2023 and the sixth since 2021. But scientists think this is just the start of a period of volcanic activity that could last for decades or even centuries.

So what is going on?

Lava crossing a road

Iceland is no stranger to volcanoes - it is one of the most volcanically active places in the world.

That is because the country is positioned above a geological hotspot, where plumes of hot material deep within the Earth rise towards the surface.

But Iceland also sits on the boundary between the Eurasian and North America tectonic plates. These plates are very slowly pulling apart from each other, creating a space for hot molten rock - or magma - to flow up.

As the magma builds up underground, the pressure increases until it breaks through the surface in an eruption (at this point the hot rock is called lava).

There are more than 100 volcanoes across Iceland and more than 30 are currently active.

A BBC composite graphic with a satellite image and an aerial image illustrating how new fissures opened up on Iceland's Reykjanes peninsula in December and January

But the last time the Reykjanes peninsula saw any lava flow was hundreds of years ago - that may have started as early as the 8th or 9th Century and continued until 1240.

Now the eruptions have started again - but why has there been an 800-year gap?

"Over geological time, the tectonic plates are pulling apart at about the speed that your fingernails grow, so a few centimetres a year," explains Prof Tamsin Mather, an Earth scientist from the University of Oxford.

"But they don't seem to smoothly pull apart - they go through these pulses of higher activity. And this is likely what we're seeing right now in the Reykjanes."

The rocks in the region can reveal even more about the past - and they show a pattern of periods of quiet lasting around 1,000 years - followed by eruptions that continue for a few centuries.

"There's evidence for about three of these types of episodes in the last 4,000 years in this area" Prof Mather explains.

"So this is proceeding as expected at the moment. And what we're expecting is a series of these relatively small, relatively short-lived eruptions over the coming years and decades."

Eruption from space

Working out how to predict when the eruptions will happen is a key concern for Iceland right now - especially as the town of Grindavik and a geothermal power plant - a key piece of national infrastructure - are in the danger zone.

"Now that the eruptions are repeating themselves, scientists have a much better idea of what is happening," explains Dr Evgenia Ilyinskaya, a volcanologist from the University of Leeds.

"So they've been tracking how the ground is inflating as magma is coming out from deep below. And now they actually can tell with a lot more certainty than was possible when to expect the magma to start breaking through the ground."

Houses on fire in Grindavik

But pinpointing exactly where an eruption will happen is harder. These aren't cone-shaped volcanoes like Italy's Mount Etna, for example, where the lava comes out at more or less the same place.

In the Reykjanes Peninsula, the magma is held more loosely under a larger area - and it erupts through cracks - or fissures - that can be miles long.

The Icelandic authorities are building large barriers around the town and power station - and these are good at holding lava back.

But if a fissure opens up inside the barriers - as was the case in Grindavik in January when some houses were destroyed - not much can be done.

A long period of eruptions will have major consequences for Iceland.

"This is the most densely populated part of Iceland - so 70% of the population lives within 40km or so," explains Dr Ilyinskaya.

"And all of the key infrastructure is there - so the main international airport, big geothermal power plants, and a lot of tourist infrastructure too, which is a big part of Iceland's economy."

Key roads being cut off by lava flow and air pollution from the eruptions are just some of the risks.

The country's capital Reykjavik also has the potential to be impacted, says Dr Ilyinskaya.

"One scenario that would be hazardous for Reykjavik (Iceland's capital) is if the eruptions move further east along the peninsula - there are lava flows from 1,000 years ago from the last eruptive cycle that are in what is now Reykjavik, so based on that it is not unfeasible that the lava flows could flow there in future eruptions"

A BBC graphic titled "historic lava flows on the Reykjanes peninsula", illustrating how many flows here date back as far as the 8th Century

So is there a way to predict what will happen in the longer term?

Scientists are looking at a number of different volcanic systems that sit across the peninsula.

"In the last cycle, the first eruptions started in the systems to the east and migrated to the west, with a few fits and starts here and there," explains Dr Dave McGarvie from Lancaster University.

This time, the first eruptions - which started in 2021 - happened in a system that sits more in the middle of the peninsula.

"That system now just seems to have completely switched off - there's no clear indication of a gathering of magma beneath it. We don't know whether that's temporary or whether it's a permanent thing and it may never erupt again in this cycle."

The most recent eruptions, which began in December, are now in a neighbouring system a little further west.

Scientists monitoring volcano

Dr McGarvie says scientists can get an idea of how much magma is held underground - and whether it is likely to shift away from Grindavik and the power station to another neighbouring volcanic system.

"If they saw the rate of magma inflow declining, then that would be an indication that perhaps it's starting to switch off and if so it may take a few months for it to completely die down.

"The question then would be is this a temporary lull or is it actually the end of this phase of activity - we're into unknown territory at that point."

Scientists are learning more with every eruption, but there's still a great deal of uncertainty for Iceland as a new volcanic era begins.

Follow Rebecca on X (formerly known as Twitter)

Related Topics

More on this story.

They fled as lava spilled into town - and they may never return

  • Published 4 February

Grindavik houses engulfed by lava

Iceland lava slowing down after day of destruction

  • Published 15 January

Lava explosions and rising smoke after a volcanic eruption near the town of Grindavik, in the Reykjanes peninsula,

Why this Iceland volcano won't cause flight chaos

  • Published 19 December 2023

Iceland volcano seen from air

Iceland volcano: What could the impact be?

  • Published 14 November 2023

Mount Fagradalsfjall volcano spews lava after an eruption in Reykjavik, Iceland, on July 16, 2023

Advertisement

First date? Try a PowerPoint presentation

Copy the code below to embed the wbur audio player on your site.

<iframe width="100%" height="124" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://player.wbur.org/endlessthread/2024/02/16/tenet-slideshow-date"></iframe>

  • Dean Russell
  • Amory Sivertson
  • Ben Brock Johnson
  • Emily Jankowski

Two people sitting in a restaurant, with one holding several printed slides.

When Jason Carman and Harpriya Bagri met, they had different takes on the film  Tenet .

Directed by Christopher Nolan,  Tenet  is considered one of the most confusing major movies. Harpriya was not a fan of its mind-boggling time-travel plot. Jason, though?

He proposed a date. They would get pizza, and he would explain the film. Harpriya agreed. But when she showed up, she did not expect to see Jason holding 29 printed slides from a presentation called " Tenet for Dummies." She also didn't know that Jason was filming.

The video of the date was later posted to X and watched 3.7 million times. Some might see the premise as a recipe for disaster. Others, a recipe for love. So which one was it?

  • Jason and Harpriya's date video
  • Jason's Tenet slide show
  • The X conversation that inspired the date
  • " Tenet , the definitive explanation " (Film Colossus)
  • " Can someone explain tenet very simply to me please? " (Reddit)

Full Transcript:

This content was originally created for audio. The transcript has been edited from our original script for clarity. Heads up that some elements (i.e. music, sound effects, tone) are harder to translate to text.

Ben Brock Johnson: Amorous Sivertson, happy belated St. Valentino's Day to you.

Amory Sivertson: Benjamin Brockis Johnsonite, back at you.

Ben: And with that in mind, what is the strangest date you've ever been on?

Amory: Probably like, I'm gonna say some dude thinking that we were on a date talking to me about something that he thought that I was interested in, and I wasn't, and we weren't. What about you?

Ben: I took out a girl named Amanda. We went to the movies, and we watched The Sixth Sense .

Amory: Classic love story.

Ben: Classic love story, and we also broke into a Speedbowl.

Amory: Is that like a go-kart?

Ben: No, it's like, you know, low-level race car — it's not the Indy 500. I don't know anything about cars.

Amory: The AAA of race car driving.

Ben: Something like that. Yeah, and she climbed over the fence with me. We definitely trespassed, and it was, like, one of those things where, like, I wanted it to be on, but I didn't know it was on, but it was definitely on. Looking back on it, it was on. But I just dropped her off and was like, "Have a good night. I hope maybe someday you'll consider dating me. OK. Goodbye."

Amory: And you lived happily ever after.

Ben: Yeah, I think she did. She certainly did.

Amory: You did, too. Your wife is one of my favorite things about you.

Ben: Yeah. But my wife didn't live "happily ever after" after. That's the problem for her.

I don't know if either of our dates would've ever gone viral, at least not as viral as the date we're talking about today.

Jason Carman: This whole, like, little Twitter virality stint was basically me capitulating to Twitter every step of the way.  

Ben: I — that, that actually worries me deeply. 

Jason: Me, too.

Amory: Jason Carman lives in San Francisco. He makes documentaries about tech startups. He also launches rockets into space. Big X — Twitter — user.

Ben: And he's single.

Ben: So, what — how's dating? How's it going? 

Jason: (Laughs.) Dating... (Laughs.)

Ben: Jason is in his early 20s, what he describes as a transitional period in the dating scene. He says standing out from the endless feed of men online is more important than ever.

Jason: Everyone's beginning to, like, realize, Oh, dating is no longer just like a fun after high school, in-college thing. So, thinking about it differently has kind of been a trip.

Ben: We better get serious; put together some PowerPoints now.

Jason: That's what I thought.

Amory: Oh yes, and his creative approach to dating has recently earned him a bit of a reputation, one he's not so sure about.

Jason: I don't know if I want to be totally known as the PowerPoint dating guy.

Ben: Too late, my friend! Jason Carman is the PowerPoint dating guy. Why?

Amory: Because about a month ago, Jason decided to go on a first date, and, instead of the usual thing — "Where'd you grow up?" "How many siblings do you have?" — he opted to give a lengthy PowerPoint presentation, a slide show.

Ben: And he filmed it for all the world to see!

Amory: Some might call it an odd approach to wooing. Others?

Jason: I guess it's the modern version of going and, I don't know, fighting a knight, fighting for one's honor. The modern version of that is making a PowerPoint.

Ben: Killing a woolly mammoth and bringing it back or something.

Jason: Yeah.

Amory: I'm sure those knights would really appreciate this comparison .

Amory: Today, Endless Thread listeners, we bring you the story of one date, two people, and 29 slides that caught the attention of millions online.

Ben: This is "Dinner and a (Slide) Show."

Harpriya Bagri: I had seen some of his stuff on Twitter before, so I kind of knew of him just through the Twitterscape.

Amory: Harpriya Bagri is a software engineer, also in the Bay Area. She works with artificial intelligence. And if you're wondering, we interviewed Harpriya and Jason separately.

Amory: Harpriya, how would you describe your dating life? 

Harpriya: You know, not great.

Amory: Can AI help with that? 

Harpriya: You know, funny that you mentioned that. I also made an AI agent to background-check my Hinge dates for me.

Ben: How's that working out for you? Harpriya and Jason didn't meet on Hinge. Their meet-cute was a tad more old fashioned.

Harpriya: There was this party. Jason was there. That's how we met. I was telling him about how I really enjoyed his videos and stuff, and he had read my blog.

Jason: She's great. She's very smart, and we're both nerds in the best sense of that. I mean, we met at a tech-optimism dinner party at my house.

Amory: A tech-optimism dinner party. Yes, you heard that correctly. They talked about things like AI, podcast audio quality, and they were hitting it off. Then they got to a somewhat contentious subject, one that would go on to have a rather big effect on their soon-to-be romantic lives.

Harpriya: If I recall correctly, it was him that had brought it up.

Jason: This movie comes up with me a lot in conversation. And I just think it's great. I don't know how. I don't intentionally bring it up. That would be really concerning for my future dating, but —

Harpriya: I had just seen it like a few weeks before that, just very recently. And I was just telling him how it was cool and all, but it wasn't like other Christopher Nolan movies. Maybe some of it went over my head. I didn't really enjoy it as much as I hoped to.

[ Fay : All I have for you is a gesture in combination with a word: Tenet.

Protagonist: That's all they've told you?]

Jason: Tenet is the most underrated Christopher Nolan movie, and hated in many ways. 

Ben: For the uninitiated, Tenet is a nearly 3-hour action movie written and directed by Christopher Nolan, the guy who brought us mind-bending films like Inception , Memento , Interstellar , Oppenheimer .

Amory: And, Ben, as you know, I am the uninitiated. I have never seen Tenet .

Ben: On this timeline.

Amory: (Laughs.) How would you describe the plot of Tenet ?

Ben: Uh, there's, um, some good guys and some bad guys, but there's one good guy. And he's trying to travel through time to stop the end of the world. And there's a machine. There's, like, a machine they have to go through to, like, to go through time. And there's a lot of discussion about entropy, which I don't really understand. And yeah, that's what I got. How'd it go? How'd that go for you?

Amory: (Laughs.)

[ Protagonist : I need some idea of the threat we face.  

Barbara: As I understand it, we're trying to prevent World War III.  

Protagonist: Nuclear holocaust.

Barbara: No. Something worse.]

Amory: Apparently, this movie is not for everyone.

Harpriya: It was very slow for probably a good chunk of it — probably a majority of it. I think I didn't see how certain things added up. 

Ben: But it is the movie for Jason.

Jason: I think it's like the most unique take on time travel that I've ever seen in a movie, and I think that's what makes it so cool.

Ben: They have a lot in common, clearly.

Amory: A lot in common. They're both at the tech-optimism party talking about Tenet . Harpriya's like, Mmm, yeah, too confusing, too long. I don't get what all the fuss is about. Normally, this might elicit a head nod and a new topic.

Ben: But Jason had been in this situation before!

Harpriya: He ended up telling me that he had an ex-girlfriend who he explained the movie Tenet to, and he made this whole, like — he did a presentation on it or something. And I was like, Oh, interesting. I didn't think I would be at the end of another presentation in the near future, but I thought it was funny in the meantime.

Ben: Fast forward a couple weeks, and Jason is on X or Twitter or whatever, and he jumps into thread with some randos about, obviously, Tenet . One tweet has a video of a Peloton instructor ranting about the movie mid-workout.

[Peloton instructor (via @JacobOller ): Did anybody see this besides me? Because I need a manual. Someone's got to explain this.]

Ben: And so he ends up tweeting someone else, to say.

Jason: I have these slides I made for a date three years ago. And people didn't believe me. I went to bed, woke up, the tweet was mini-viral. Posted the slides. That went very viral. And then some guy replied, "You should record yourself on a date doing the slides," which I proceeded to do.

Amory: Jason is, among other things, a self-described content creator. And he knew Harpriya had recently started to make her own content. So, Jason got an idea.

Harpriya: He had just, like, texted me, being like, Oh, do you remember when I was telling you about Tenet , blah, blah blah? And he was like, How about I give you the presentation? Do you wanna go on a date? And I was like, OK, that's fine. 

Jason: She didn't know at the time that it was gonna be recorded. But I'd met her a few times. She seemed cool. I knew she was thinking about getting into content.

Harpriya: He was very explicit to not go on Twitter beforehand.

Jason: I was just like, I know she would be interested in doing something like this once she knew what it really was. And this is another thing I like about Tenet's approach, is much of it is covert.

Harpriya: I literally thought we were just gonna talk about the movie. But, no, it was a lot more than that.

Amory: A lot more than that. Here we go!

Ben: How the date went down, in a minute.

[SPONSOR BREAK]

[ Jason : People didn't think I was serious about making a slideshow about the movie Tenet . But I did. I have it here.]

Amory: So what happens when a guy goes on a date with a PowerPoint presentation and secretly records the whole thing?

Ben: He might get beat up. He also might get 3.7 million views , obviously. But let's not get ahead of ourselves.

[Jason: And so I asked a friend of mine who I met a few weeks ago, a girl named Harpriya. I texted her last night, Do you want to come to a date, and I'll give you my Tenet presentation? So that's what's going to happen since everyone has asked to, well, see the presentation. So, here we go.]

Amory: OK, so she was warned. A presentation is on the dinner table, is on the menu.

Ben: He asked for consent before he gave her his Tenet presentation.

Amory: So, about an hour before the date, Jason sets up at an Italian restaurant, Norcina, in San Francisco's Marina District. He got seats in front of a floor-length window.

Ben: Meanwhile, two friends with cameras and audio equipment hide behind an outdoor dining booth across the street. Secrecy is critical.

Jason: There was an area mic I hid under a flower vase right there. The restaurant was in on it.

Ben: Oh my goddddd!

Jason: So, the cameras were set up, and we were worried about the glare of the lighting. It was all stressful. We were having some issues with audio. Then, eventually, we got everything straight.

Amory: As for Harpriya?

Harpriya: I had researched the restaurant beforehand. I was really excited to eat food and, you know, get to know him better.

[Jason: Hey, how's it going? 

Harpriya: Hi.

Jason: Nice to see you.

Harpriya: Good to see you.

Jason: Thanks for coming.]

Ben: The date starts like a lot of first dates: kinda awkward. There's some nervous, small talk — about spritzes.

[Jason: I'm normally not like a spritz-flight guy, but it's really good here. And a friend, maybe you got a one, so I don't know what to do. Like spritzes at all before.  

Harpriya: What is a spritz?]

Ben: Great question.

Amory: Harpriya, I'm with you, girl.

Ben: But also, I'm in. I wish someone would take me out for a spritz flight.

Amory: Let's do that after this. Let's get a spritz.

Ben: A spritz flight.

Amory: So there's also this kind of vibe, like they both know something is odd. Then, Harpriya notices that Jason is holding something — a folder.

Jason: And I don't think she knew what was in it. She was looking at it a little bit, and then I held it up.

Harpriya: And he pulls out like 29 pages or something of these printed slides. And yeah, I was laughing, a little confused. And I was like, Is this serious? Is this partly a joke? But then, he was committed. 

Amory: There's like a weird joke in here, like, "And then he pulled out his slides!" It's like, "Oh gosh, no."

[Harpriya: Oh, you're serious. 

Jason: Yeah. Yeah. I mean —

Harpriya: You printed it out? I knew you said you had a presentation. I did not think —  

Jason: Yeah. I thought it'd be, like, weird if it was like, I don't know — I just printed the slides. It's only, like, 29 slides.]

Jason: She looks over her shoulder, almost like, I'm not sure for what. Was she looking for help? Was she looking to leave? Was she looking like — what was it?

Harpriya: Yeah, I was like, You know, let's just go with it. Let's just dive right in.

Ben: The slide show is titled, " Tenet for Dummies ." And it starts with text explaining, quote, "If you're reading this, you probably didn't understand the film Tenet ... It's OK!... you're just not as film smart as you thought."

Harpriya: "You're not the film expert you think you are," or something like that. He had all these, like, jokes in the beginning. And I was like, What are you trying to do?

Amory: Oh, boy.

Harpriya: I was like, This could be going very downhill if you're starting off with that slide.

Amory: Oh, I would agree, yes.

[Jason: I made these like three years ago. This is sassier than, uh, it's — you know, this is not about you. It's about the theoretical person who doesn't understand Tenet , which is I think most of the population.

Harpriya: OK. OK. You know what? Let's keep going. Yeah.]

Jason: I was just so nervous. I was trying my best to be myself, but not be too loud, be loud enough for the audio. Also just, like, the slides suck. The slides are not meant for this.

Amory: This video, we should say, is 17 minutes long, so it's edited.

Ben: Can't believe she stayed that long. Shocking.

Amory: Well, the date was longer. This is the edited version, and I have to admit, when I watched this for the first time, I kind of thought the whole thing was a setup. I thought Harpriya had to have been in on it.

Amory: You could say that there's romantic chemistry and you want to see where this goes. There's another part of me that's like, Hmm, this is something that we could make content around together, and it could do really well. You know what I mean?

Jason: Well, if anything, the first.

Amory: Whatever he told you, what he pulled out was not what you were expecting?

Harpriya: No, no, no, no. I literally thought we were gonna talk about it.

Ben: Regardless, the date doesn't seem like it's starting well for Jason, the guy who said "you're not as film-smart as you think you are." Until...

Jason: The first time it happened where she actually got interested was the palindrome. 

Harpriya: He showed this very ancient artifact where it said, it said "tenet," and I think that pulled me in.

Amory: This slide shows a matrix carved into stone. It was discovered in the ruins of Pompeii and later found elsewhere. It kind of looks like a secret code.

Ben: There are five words in the matrix. And they all can be read backwards and forwards. The word in the center is "tenet."

[Jason: No one knows what it is. 

Harpriya: Where is it? 

Jason: It's everywhere. They have it on doors. They have it on buildings.]

Harpriya: Wait, I didn't know this. Like, that was really cool.

Ben: This is where having seen the film actually helps, Amory, because the whole movie is about time inversion ...

[Barbara: It's inverted. Its entropy runs backwards. So to our eyes, its movement is reversed.]

Ben: ...which is different than the time travel we usually imagine, where we get in a machine, press some buttons, and go ride a dinosaur.

[Barbara: Don't try to understand it. Feel it.]

Jason: And then the next slide, I think she remembered that it was a PowerPoint slide on a movie on a date and went back to being like, Um, what?

[Harpriya: How many slides in are we?

Jason: Probably like halfway there.

Harpriya: Halfway there.

Jason: Part two, part six, but...]

Jason: I was like, Oh my God, these slides are just monotonous and unclear and slow. And, like, I'm getting bored, and I'm getting out of it. And so I quickly just like — I was like, OK, this happened, this happened, this happened. And then when I did that, went through four slides that I didn't think were that important very willy-nilly, she was like, Wait, what was that one?

Amory: "That one" was a pretty cool slide, actually. Kind of a timeline of the whole movie, showing at what point the characters are going forwards and backwards.

Ben: If you ever get confused watching this movie, this is the slide to look at.

Harpriya: He talked about that machine that reverses the entropy. And they don't really show this as much in the movie, which is why I think that was a big point of confusion for me, is when they go backwards in time, they're reliving every day at the same unit of time. Like, a second is a second, but backwards.

Ben: And this is the moment that things really took off.

Jason: The awkwardness was gone at that point. And it was just like, I want to see this PowerPoint thing through and then talk about time travel theory at the end. 

Harpriya: And so we got really into it. We got into all these details, and it was connecting together and it had a lot of like lightbulb moments talking about what that could mean and what our theories were on whether or not it exists.

[Jason: I guess my question is, do you think time travel is real?  

Harpriya: Well, I think the whole point is, like, time is relative.  

Jason: Yeah, subjective and relative. Lots of different — yeah. 

Harpriya: You time-travel backwards. Now, there's two of you. 

Jason: I don't see why that wouldn't happen.]

Harpriya: But yeah, I think it was really cool to be able to talk about it just because I feel like it's not a topic I normally talk about.

Amory: Ah, that first date. Romance.

Ben: True love.

Amory: True love.

Ben: Eventually this PowerPoint date kind of morphs. They get pizza. They put down the slides. They eat. All of a sudden, it's just like a normal date.

Amory: Except for the secret camera part.

Jason: Once the pizza moment happened, I started laughing like the way that you do when you say "cut" kind of thing. I started laughing and said into my mic, "OK, guys, I think we did it." And then, at that point, she totally knew what was going on.

Harpriya: And I was like, "I had a little bit of a feeling!" I did!

Amory: Whoa, that was at the end of the date?

Jason: And I was like, "Are you? I could totally delete the footage. Like, seriously, it's no problem. Like, I don't even know if it went well." And she was like, "Let's just see it. Like, let's go look at it."

Harpriya: And later on in the night, we went over to Jason's apartment, and I watched him edit this whole thing, shrink it down to 17 minutes.

Amory: Oh my god, that night?

Harpriya: Yes. That night. (Laughs.)

Ben: Interesting.

Amory: No, it'll be really cool. I'm gonna give you my presentation. Then we'll go back to my apartment, and you can watch me edit the footage of the date that I recorded that I didn't tell you that I was recording until the end. No notes. Sounds like —

Ben: Oh, lovely. Can't wait to come up to your place and have a drink.

Ben: Jason uploaded the video the next day.

Jason: And that was terrifying. Thankfully, I think it went OK and wasn't horrible, per se.

Ben: People liked it! Sixteen thousand people, to be precise. Millions watched.

Amory: But some people were not huge fans.

Amory: Yes, believe it or not, some took issue with the surreptitious filming.

Harpriya: A lot of my friends have asked me that question, like, Were you offended or, you know, whatever else? Like, some of my friends clearly would not be cool with it. But no, I thought it was funny. I genuinely thought it was funny.

Ben: Others saw the very premise as a bad idea. Like the definition of mansplaining.

Harpriya: I can see why people think that. But I think in reality it honestly didn't feel like that at all. It was definitely more of a conversation. It was funny. And then there was a lot of banter and back-and-forth. I don't think he's a mansplainer. I think he's a great guy.

Jason: I think it's a person thing. I wouldn't try this on a blind date with someone off of a dating app or just a random person — like, I knew Harpriya was someone that would appreciate something like this. 

Amory: I want to know what movie Harpriya would explain to you.

Jason: It would be funny to do it and have people vote who did better. I think she would do better, 100%. But that would be, that would be a great follow up.

Harpriya: My favorite movie in the whole world is Cars , like the Disney Pixar movie.

Amory: Yes! I've never seen it, but I love this. I love that we are miles away, seemingly, from Tenet .

Harpriya: It's not just this animation about talking cars. It's, I feel like, so deep and has a lot of philosophical meaning to it that people miss. So I would love to give a presentation about Cars . I feel like I can really talk about that movie a lot.

Ben: Oh man, all I have to say, Harpriya is "ka-chow."

[Lightning McQueen: Me. You. Dinner. Pah-ka-chow. Cha-chow. Pah!

Sally Carrera: What that? Ow. Ouh. Please. Ugh.]

Ben: In the end, they both said the date was a learning experience. Not just about Tenet . They learned some other things, too.

Jason: If you're someone who's already anxious and paranoid about what people think of what you're saying, which I certainly am as well, then your problem is definitely not worrying about saying too much. You just need to be out there and confident in what you're saying or your PowerPoint presentation.

Harpriya: Maybe, it's like, in an odd way, the bar of a fun date is higher. It could be so dynamic. It doesn't have to be like, "How many siblings do you have?" "What's your favorite color?" Especially to understand why someone likes something so much is truly a reflection of themselves that you don't get from the very basic conversations of how many siblings you have and your favorite color and all those basic questions.

Ben: The Tenet date was a few weeks ago. Has there been a second date?

Jason: Uh, no. We have been talking a lot about things, but there's not been a second date.

Harpriya: Jason and I have kept in touch via text. And we'll see. I don't know.

Amory: Well, now you have a Cars presentation that you have to put together and give.

Harpriya: I know. So that's tempting. I think I'll — do I tell him? Should I tell him or just invite him?

Amory: Just invite him.

Harpriya: Give him a taste of his own medicine.

Ben: I have to say Amory, that when we first talked to Jason, there were like so many red flags for me where I was like, Here's a guy who — he's explaining a movie to this woman, he's subjecting this poor woman to 29 slides of explanation on their first date. But the more that we talked to Jason, I was like, You know what? This guy's a nice guy, I think. He's actually a nice guy, and it was really nice to hear Harpriya say like, No, I was good with this. And to me it's just a reminder that, you know, true love is very subjective. And also, Harpriya, I really look forward to the Cars slide-deck explanation. My kids would also love that.

Amory: Yeah, I think Harpriya is smart as hell, and I think if she had really been miserable, she would've left. And I guess my only thought is that like a date is not, Let me tell you about this thing. A date is maybe. Let's each tell each other about a thing.

Amory: If we can go back in time, time travel, we can do this date again!

Ben: Oh, let's see it happen.

Amory: And they can each give their presentation, and then they will live happily ever after if they so choose to.

Amory: Endless Thread is a production of WBUR in Boston.

Ben: (Speaks "backwards.”) It was produced by (speaks "backwards").

Amory: Are you trying to say his name backwards?

(Ben speaking "backwards" in reverse.)

This episode was produced by Dean Russell. It was co-hosted by Ben Brock Johnson. And...

Amory: ...Amory Sivertson. Mix and sound design by Emily Jankowski.

Ben: The rest of our team is Katelyn Harrop, Samata Joshi, Frannie Monahan, Matt Reed, Grace Tatter, and Paul Vaitkus.

Amory: If you have a PowerPoint presentation that you want us to hear, invite us out. We'll give you one as well.

Ben: Take us out for a spritz flight for crying out loud.

Amory: It's about time, don't you think?

Amory: Yeah, just email Endless Thread at WBUR.org. That's how the best dates start.

Ben: Yeah, you don't, you don't even have to call or text. You can just email us. It's fine.

Headshot of Dean Russell

Dean Russell Producer, WBUR Podcasts Dean Russell is a producer for WBUR Podcasts.

Headshot of Amory Sivertson

Amory Sivertson Senior Producer, Podcasts Amory Sivertson is a senior producer for podcasts and the co-host of Endless Thread.

Headshot of Ben Brock Johnson

Ben Brock Johnson Executive Producer, Podcasts Ben Brock Johnson is the executive producer of podcasts at WBUR and co-host of the podcast Endless Thread.

Headshot of Emily Jankowski

Emily Jankowski Sound Designer Emily Jankowski is a sound designer for WBUR’s podcast department. She mixes and designs for Endless Thread, Last Seen and The Common.

More from Endless Thread

keep powerpoint slide show going

Top Contributors in PowerPoint: Steve Rindsberg  -  Jim_ Gordon  -  John Korchok  -  Bob Jones AKA: CyberTaz   ✅

February 13, 2024

Top Contributors in PowerPoint:

Steve Rindsberg  -  Jim_ Gordon  -  John Korchok  -  Bob Jones AKA: CyberTaz   ✅

  • Search the community and support articles
  • Microsoft 365 and Office
  • Search Community member

Ask a new question

Powerpoint 2016 keeps switching slides erratically in presentation mode on MAC

In presentation mode my Powerpoint 2016 on mojave keeps switching slides erratically after a couple seconds. It is not automatic slide transition. Why? Because it keeps going back. And not just one but it jumps back multiple slides. If I have a external monitor it just keeps switching on the external monitor while I still see the correct slide on the laptop.

What can I do? Can I completely purge Office from my Mac and reinstall?

Report abuse

Rena Yu MSFT

  • Microsoft Agent |

I'd like to share a summary for the issue here which will benefit other community members.

Power Point slide show may jump automatically back to prior slide 

Environment:

1.                    OS: Mojave 10.14.1 (18B75).

2.                    PowerPoint version: 16.18 (Wait on a slide for about 30 seconds in full screen presentation mode, the slide will automatically skip to a previous slide)

3.                    PowerPoint version: 16.19 (181109) ( Some customers fix the issue by upgrading to 16.19 , but the other ones still have the issue) (The 16.19 may make the issue idle time from 30 seconds to 10 minutes)

4.                    The issue happens to all files

5.                    The issue happens in full screen presentation mode but not in presenter view mode.

6.                    The issue disappears when all the customers trying to do a screen recording.

Workaround:

Play the presentation in presenter view mode.

Assessment:

We have received reproduce video and some sample process. We are trying to report this issue and will post back any updates as soon as possible. For affected customers to easily identify the information here, this thread will be closed. For more information about this issue, please check updates in this thread: Power Point slide show keep jumping back to prior slide .

3 people found this reply helpful

Was this reply helpful? Yes No

Sorry this didn't help.

Great! Thanks for your feedback.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

Thanks for your feedback.

Replies (1) 

Question info.

  • Norsk Bokmål
  • Ελληνικά
  • Русский
  • עברית
  • العربية
  • ไทย
  • 한국어
  • 中文(简体)
  • 中文(繁體)
  • 日本語

IMAGES

  1. PowerPoint 2016 : How to Put Slide Show on Continuous Loop

    keep powerpoint slide show going

  2. How to Start a Slideshow in PowerPoint

    keep powerpoint slide show going

  3. Setting a PowerPoint Slide Show to Loop Continuously

    keep powerpoint slide show going

  4. Setting a PowerPoint Slide Show to Loop Continuously

    keep powerpoint slide show going

  5. PowerPoint 2016 Tutorial Setting Up the Slide Show Microsoft Training

    keep powerpoint slide show going

  6. How To Make a Custom Slide Show in PowerPoint 2016?

    keep powerpoint slide show going

VIDEO

  1. How to insert new slide in PowerPoint

  2. PowerPoint Slide Show

  3. PowerPoint Slide Show Presentation1 2023 11 06 20 35 19

  4. PowerPoint Slide Show FRIENDS GLOBAL 11 UNIT 1A Vocabulary

  5. PowerPoint Slide Show VDO Manual 2023 11 16 11 41 23

  6. PowerPoint Slide Show super4 2023 09 08 17 17 59

COMMENTS

  1. Setting a PowerPoint Slide Show to Loop Continuously

    In PowerPoint, go to Slide Show > Set Up Slide Show > Browsed at a Kiosk (Full Screen) > OK. Set the time each slide appears on the screen by selecting Slide Show > Rehearse Timings on the first slide. Use Next to move to the next slide and Pause to pause recording, or type a length of time in the Slide Time box.

  2. How to Loop a PowerPoint Presentation

    Head back to the "Set Up Show" window by selecting "Set Up Slide Show" in the "Set Up" group of the "Slide Show" tab. There are a couple of options you need to select, but one important note is that you must first select "Using Timings, If Present" under the "Advance Slides" group.

  3. Create a self-running presentation

    Select one of the following: Start Recording from Beginning Start Recording from Current Slide In the Record Slide Show dialog box, select the Narrations and laser pointer check box, and if appropriate, select or deselect the Slide and animation timings check box.

  4. How to keep PPT show running while still working on the PC in other

    1: Setup slideshow>Browsed by an individual (window). 2:Uncheck Show scrollbar. 3:Set the slide transition automatically after a specific time. 4: Run the slide show and move the other application window to the second monitor after starting the slideshow.

  5. How to Loop a PowerPoint Slide Show to Repeat Automatically

    Step 1: Apply transitions to automatically advance slides during a slide show Transitions occur between slides when you run a slide show. To apply transitions to automatically advance slides during a slide show: In Normal View or Slide Sorter View, display or select a slide. Click the Transitions tab in the Ribbon.

  6. How to Loop a PowerPoint Slideshow so It Automatically Starts Over

    1. Open the Microsoft PowerPoint presentation that you want to loop. 2. With your PowerPoint presentation open, click on the "Slide Show" tab, then click on "Set Up Slide Show." Open the...

  7. How to Play PowerPoint Slides Automatically

    Nov 20, 2023 8 mins read Share this article The PowerPoint autoplay feature is an amazing tool for creating slideshows that advance automatically. Self-running PowerPoint presentations are great for leaving in kiosks or publicity booths. You can even show them with recordings or voiceovers to make sure your audience gets the most out of it.

  8. How to Run a PowerPoint Slide Show Automatically (Set Up a ...

    Click OK. To set up a presentation to run automatically, but those watching the slide show do NOT have control over when slides advance: Click the Slide Show tab in the Ribbon and then click Set Up Slide Show. A dialog box appears. Under Show type, select Browsed by an individual (window). Click OK.

  9. How to Loop a PowerPoint Presentation Continuously

    1. Open your PPT presentation and go to Transitions tab. Choose one you prefer in the Transition to This Slide group. 2. In Timing group, uncheck the box of On Mouse Click (It means to wait until a mouse click to move to the next slide), and enter the value in the box of After. (It means to move the next slide after a certain number of seconds). 3.

  10. How To Loop a PowerPoint Presentation

    Luckily, learning how to loop a PowerPoint is very easy! Just follow these 3 steps: 1. Open your presentation and go to the Slide Show tab. 2. Select the Set Up Slide Show option for the Set-Up Options window to appear. 3. In this window, go to the "Show options group" and tick the Loop continuously until 'Esc' (the first option).

  11. How To Loop A PowerPoint Slideshow? Detailed Guide

    Select the "Slide Show" option to start a loop for a particular set of slides. To initiate the loop, click the first slide in the thumbnail pane on the left. Click the final slide you wish to add to the loop while holding your keyboard's "Shift" key. Next, select "Setup Show" and turn on the looping feature.

  12. How to Make PowerPoint Start Again After End

    1. Go to the Slide Show menu. 2. Click on the Set Up Slide Show. 3. Check the Loop continuously until 'Esc' and click OK. 4. Check the result by enabling Slide Show (F5). 5. Save your file (CTRL+S) once everything is done. Love the template? Get Curvy SWOT with Circular Image PowerPoint Template for FREE now!

  13. Start a presentation automatically with a PowerPoint Show

    Accessibility center Make it so that your PowerPoint presentation starts automatically by saving it as a .ppsx file.

  14. Keep slides updated

    Note: This only applies to presentations stored on OneDrive or SharePoint. To configure this setting go to the Slide Show tab of the ribbon, select Set Up Slide Show, and in the Show options group you'll find Keep slides updated. If you're already in your presentation and you want to turn slide syncing on (or off) select the More slide show ...

  15. Options to deal with PowerPoint pausing Slide Show or Presenter View

    Option 1: Use Reading View The first option is to run the slide show using Reading View. This view allows you to run the slide show in the PowerPoint window. It offers all the features of PowerPoint slide shows and it does not pause when the focus moves from PowerPoint to another program. Animations, transitions, and videos continue to run.

  16. Keep your screen alive during presentations to ...

    You can simply click the Turn On button in the Presentation Settings section. To change the settings, click the Projector icon. By default, the Windows Mobility Center feature is only available on laptops, notebooks, and tablet PCs. (You can enable it on desktop computers, but this requires editing the Windows Registry.)

  17. How to stop PowerPoint from exiting presentation mode after the last

    Based on your description, we are trying to test as you mentioned as below, when we go to the last slide and then click again/ press the arrow down key, the slide will be black and show " End of slide show, click to exit ", and click again which can back to the last slide, may I confirm this is what you mean?

  18. How to stop Powerpoint from jumping to next/previous slide when

    What I'd like to be able to do is to lock the current slide so that using the scroll bar or mouse wheel only navigates around the slide, and Page Up/Down is needed to move to different slides in the presentation. I'm sure everyone's familiar with the concept from using Adobe Acrobat. Is there any way to do this in PowerPoint?

  19. FIX: PowerPoint Keeps Going Back to the First Slide

    Does your PowerPoint keep jumping back to the first slide? If this is happening to your presentation, then follow the steps in this video and see if it help...

  20. Powerpoint slideshow stops playing

    Created on December 6, 2021 Powerpoint slideshow stops playing My slideshow plays automatically and plays the audio automatically after the assigned time up till slide 18... then it stops and waits until a key is pressed to continue. This thread is locked. You can vote as helpful, but you cannot reply or subscribe to this thread.

  21. The 5 golden rules of PowerPoint design

    We've all seen PowerPoint presentations where slides contain too much text. The human brain struggles to listen and read at the same time. If you are presenting to an audience, keep the text on slides to a minimum. Consider employing the "5-5-5" rule. No more than 5 lines, no more than 5 words, no more than 5 minutes. ... "Is this going to ...

  22. Is Iceland entering a new volcanic era?

    Watch: Dramatic aerials show fast lava spread after Iceland eruption. This week, Iceland woke up to yet another day of fire, as towering fountains of lava lit up the dark morning sky.

  23. Powerpoint slideshow keeps repeating every slide before moving to next

    Replies (1) JA Joe's answer Replied on November 7, 2015 Report abuse There could be something wrong with the slide transition settings. For more information refer the link. https://support.office.com/en-us/article/Add-edit-or-remove-transitions-0260E88A-3260-430E-A01A-4E6ACCA09954 Was this reply helpful? Yes No Hi.

  24. First date? Try a PowerPoint presentation

    Jason: I guess it's the modern version of going and, I don't know, fighting a knight, fighting for one's honor. The modern version of that is making a PowerPoint. Ben: Killing a woolly mammoth and ...

  25. How to prevent Windows 11 from sleeping during PowerPoint

    1. Press the Windows key type "Control Panel". 2. Choose "Hardware and Sound". 3. Click on the "Power" options. Click "Change plan settings". 4. Select "Changed advanced power settings." Click the "plus" sign next to sleep. Make sure the "Allow hybrid sleep" option is disable. Hope this helps.

  26. Powerpoint 2016 keeps switching slides erratically in presentation

    Microsoft Agent | Moderator Replied on November 23, 2018 Report abuse Hi Tobias, I'd like to share a summary for the issue here which will benefit other community members. Symptoms: Power Point slide show may jump automatically back to prior slide Environment: 1. OS: Mojave 10.14.1 (18B75). 2.