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IELTS Reading: Cambridge 13 Test 1 Reading Passage 1, Case Study: Tourism New Zealand website; with best solutions, explanations and bonus tips

This IELTS Reading post deals with a total solution package for IELTS Cambridge 13 Reading test 1 passage 1 . This is a targeted post for candidates who have major difficulties in finding and understanding Reading Answers. This post can guide you the best to understand every Reading answer easily and without much difficulty. Finding IELTS Reading answers is a step-by-step process and I hope this post can help you in this respect.

IELTS Reading: Cambridge 13 Test 1 Reading Passage 1, Case Study: Tourism New Zealand website; with best solutions, explanations and bonus tips

Reading Passage 1 :

The headline of the passage: case study: tourism new zealand website.

Questions 1-7 ( Completing table with ONE WORD ONLY):

In this type of question, candidates are asked to write only one word to complete a table on the given topic. For this type of question, first, skim the passage to find the keywords in the paragraph concerned with the answer, and then scan to find the exact word.

[ TIPS: Here scanning technique will come in handy. Target the keywords of the questions to find the answers. Remember to focus on Proper nouns, random Capital letters, numbers, special characters of text etc.]

Question 1: allowed businesses to ______ information regularly.

Keywords for these answers: database, allowed businesses, information, regularly,

In paragraph no. 2, we find the mention of the word ‘database’ in the third line. Here, lines 8 & 9, the writer mentions, “In addition, because participating businesses were able to update the details they gave on a regular basis….”.

Here, details = information

So, the answer is:  update

Question 2: provided a country-wide evaluation of businesses, including their impact on the _________.

Keywords for this answer: database, country-wide evaluation, impact on

The last line of paragraph no. 2 has the answer. Here, the writer suggests, “As part of this, the effect of each business on the environment was considered.”

Here, effect = impact

So, the answer is: environment                     

Question 3: e.g. an interview with a former sports __________.  

Keywords for this answer: special features, interview, a former sports

The answer can be found in paragraph 3, lines 1-3. The words ‘interview’ and ‘former’ are formed in line number 2. The writer says, “.. .. . One of the most popular was an interview with former New Zealand All Blacks rugby captain Tana Umaga.”

Here, rugby = sports

So, the answer is: captain                  

Question 4: and an interactive tour of various locations used in ________.

Keywords for this answer: interactive tour, various locations

The answer is in paragraph 3, lines 4-5. The lines say, “…… was an interactive journey through a number of locations chosen for blockbuster films …… ..”.

Here, journey = tour,

A number of locations = various locations,

Chosen for = used in,

So, the answer is: films                      

Question 5: varied depending on the __________. 

Keywords for these answers: driving routes, varied, depending on

Paragraph 3, lines 8-9 has the answer to this question. The lines say, “…. . .the site catalogued the most popular driving routes in the country, highlighting different routes according to the season ….. . .”.

Here, different = varied,

according to = depending on,

So, the answers are:  season            

Question 6: including a map showing selected places, details of public transport and local _______.

Keywords for this answer:   travel planner, a map, public transport, local

The answer lies in paragraph no. 4, line 4. The paragraph begins with ‘travel planner’. In the subsequent lines, we can find the mention of ‘public transport’. In line no. 4 it says, “… . There were also links to accommodation in the area.”

Here, the phrase ‘in the area’ can be replaced with the word ‘local’.

So, the answer is: accommodation

Question 7: travelers could send a link to their ________.

Keywords for this answer:   ‘Your Words’, travelers, send, link to,

The answer is in paragraph no. 4. ‘Your Words’ is the name of a section of the website www.newzealand.com. We can see that the phrase ‘Your Words’ is present in line 6 of paragraph 4. So, we need to read lines 6 & 7 to find the answer.

The author says, “ ….. . . The website also had a ‘Your Words’ section where anyone could submit a blog of their New Zealand travels for possible inclusion on the website.”

Here, anyone could submit = travelers could send a link to

So, the answer is: blog

Questions 8-13: (TRUE/FALSE/NOT GIVEN)

In this type of question, candidates must find out whether:

The statement in the question matches with the account in the text- TRUE The statement contradicts the account in the text- FALSE There is no clear connection of the statement with the account in the text- NOT GIVEN

Question 8: The website www.newzealand.com aimed to provide ready-made itineraries and packages for travel companies and individual tourists.

Keywords for this answer: the website, aimed, itineraries, travel packages

To find the answer to this question, look for the words itineraries and travel packages. The answer is in Paragraph 6. Here, lines 1 and 2 say, “ The website was set up to allow both individuals and travel organizations to create itineraries and travel packages to suit their own needs and interests.”

This means that the aim of the website was to allow individuals and travel organizations to do their work on their own, the website did not provide any ready-made itineraries and travel packages.

The statement clearly contradicts the text.

So, the answer is: FALSE

Question 9: It was found that most visitors started searching on the website by geographical location.

Keywords for this answer: started searching, geographical location

The answer is not anywhere in the passage. The question is about starting the search in the website.

  In paragraph 6 line 3, the author says, “…… visitors can search for activities not solely by geographical locations, but also by the particular nature of the activity.” However, nowhere it says anything about starting the search.

So, the answer is: NOT GIVEN

Question 10: According to research, 26% of visitor satisfaction is related to their accommodation.

Keywords for this answer: 26%, visitor satisfaction, accommodation

** Special answer-finding technique:

There is a number in the question (26%). If the answer is TRUE, 26% has to be in the text. For FALSE, the number will be different; or, the number will be 26% (but it will be related to other matters). If the number is still 26%, yet it doesn’t match with other keywords, the answer will be NOT GIVEN.

The answer is in lines 4, 5 & 6 of paragraph no. 6. Here, the writer says, “This is important as research shows that activities are the key driver of visitor satisfaction, contributing 74% to visitor satisfaction , while transport and accommodation account for the remaining 26% .”

Here, the lines clearly contradict the question. Transportation and accommodation account for 26%. Visitor satisfaction accounts for 74%. If only accommodation accounted for 26%, we could write TRUE. 

Question 11: Visitors to New Zealand like to become involved in the local culture.

Keywords for this answer: like to, involved, local nature

The answer lies in lines 7-9 of paragraph 6. The author says, “…. It has also been found that visitors enjoy cultural activities most when they are interactive, such as visiting a marae (meeting ground) to learn more about traditional life.”

It means that visitors like to engage in local culture.

So, the answer is: TRUE

Question 12: Visitors like staying in small hotels in New Zealand rather than in larger ones.

Keywords for this answer:  like staying, small hotels

In paragraphs 6 & 7, there is no mention of staying in hotels. There is no comparison between small and large hotels also.

So the answer is: NOT GIVEN

Question 13: Many visitors feel it is unlikely that they will return to New Zealand after their visit.

Keywords for this answer: feel, unlikely, will return, after their visit

The answer is in paragraph 7. Here, lines 4 and 5 states, “Because of the long-haul flight, most visitors stay for longer (average 20 days) and want to see as much of the country as possible on what is often seen as a once-in-a-lifetime visit .”

Here, the phrase ‘often seen as a once-in-a-lifetime visit’ means that there is a very low possibility that the visit will happen again.

So the answer is: TRUE

Bonus tips:

You must pay attention to WORD LIMIT. For instance, if you have to complete a sentence using NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS; and the correct answer in the text is ‘dress made of cotton’, you cannot write the answer as ‘dress made of cotton’. You need to change it to ‘cotton dress’.

If you like this post, and need any assistance about IELTS Reading, please make comments below. 

Click here for solutions to Cambridge 13 Reading Test 1 Passage 2

Click here for solutions to Cambridge 13 Reading Test 1 Passage 3

Important vocabulary with explanations for Cambridge 13 Test 1 Reading Passage 1, 2, 3

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59 thoughts on “ IELTS Reading: Cambridge 13 Test 1 Reading Passage 1, Case Study: Tourism New Zealand website; with best solutions, explanations and bonus tips ”

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thanku really it’s very helpfull

Thank you for help

it was very helpful, thanks!.

Thank u ???

i although questions were all completely explained, i did n’t understand question number 10.

The question asks you to decide whether 26% visitor satisfaction is related to accommodation. We find in the passage, 26% visitor satisfaction is related to accommodation and transport. So, here in the question, transport is missing. This is why the answer is “FALSE’.

u meant that 26% is divided in transportating and accommodation acc. to passage.

There is a number in the question (26%). If the answer is TRUE, 26% has to be in the text. If it is FALSE, the number will be different; or, the number will be 26% (but it will be related to other matters). If the number is still 26%, yet it doesn’t match with other key-words, the answer will be NOT GIVEN.

The answer can be found in lines 4, 5 & 6 of paragraph no. 6. Here, the writer says, “This is important as research shows that activities are the key driver of visitor satisfaction, contributing 74% to visitor satisfaction, while transport and accommodation account for the remaining 26%.”

In there,it was written like transport AND accommodation account for remaining 26%. Not ooonly accommodation account for 26% of visitor satisfaction. It is with transport

Thank you so much, it is very helpful

Plzz Sir mainu tusi mcq diya teps diyo reading diya v te listening diya v plzz mainu bht jada problem aa rhi aa ohna nu solve krn ch te ik headings diya v

Hello Kamaljeet, I don’t understand Punjabi much and I didn’t get clearly from what you wrote. But as far as I can understand you, I think you have problems in MCQs. Plz follow my other lessons and surely you’ll get help in this question type. For Headings, I have some good works available in this website.

Hlo sir mainu mcq ch bht problem aa rhi aa te heading ch v plzz mainu ehna dona diya tips dedo menumeration listening ch v mcq di hi problem aundi a jada plzz help me

Super helpful! Thank you so much!

If i add some explanations,

The reason NG isn’t the correct answer: As far as the ‘transport’ was mentioned along with accommodation as one of the factors contributing to the 26% of visitors satisfaction on the paraghagh, we cannot ignore transport’s contribution to the 26%. So, it means there is definitely certain percent related to ‘transport’. And, this means accommodation cannot account for the whole 26%, which is contradicting the sentence of No.10 question. Thereby the evidence to decide whether the No.10 sentence is right or wrong is clearly given on the paragragh, and the answer is F.

I figured it out this way. Hope this helpful to you.

Dear Kimmy, the way you explained can be considered correct. The way I explained it can also be taken as correct.

Hello sir My reading scores had stucked on 5.5 bands and I have exam on 29th June pls share me some tips to crack my ielts.

Dear Rikta, Try to follow these suggestions. 1. give importance in synonyms. 2. learn the tricks of paraphrasing. 3. do not take more than 1 minute in each question. 4. Try to guess some answers. 5. Be careful about proper nouns and use of capital letters. 6. try to practice some mock tests before your exam. 7. Remember you can’t solve all types of questions. so give importance on the types you are comfortable with.

Is it okay to write all your answers in capital letters?

YES, for Reading and Listening. Not for Writing.

Thank you so much! It’s really helpful ??

Its really a most helpful website

I need tips in paragraph type questions nad match the heading

Please share some techniques regarding solving list of heading or match the statement with paragraph…please!

Sir I don’t understand Question 13 What does the question mean ?

Dear Yoon, Thanks for the question. Question 13: Many visitors feel it is unlikely that they will return to New Zealand after their visit. This question means that many visitors fear that they may not return to New Zealand after their visit.

I’m very confused between not given and false. Please give me some tips.

http://ieltsdeal.com/ielts-reading-how-to-find-answers-for-true-false-not-given-or-yes-no-not-given-questions-best-strategies-methodstricks-and-tips/

Thank you Najib for useful support. It is rare that anyone who gives explanation of IELTS reading with tips. Everybody gives simple tips only, what makes difference between you and them. Request explanation on rest of the Cambridge books. Its really really helpful and useful. Your website is unique.

Welcome! And I request you to pray for me. And the rest is coming. Work is going on.

i didn’t understood the answer of quest 10.. can u plz hlp me.. i have doubt that why it is false because it clearly said that 26 % accounts for transport and accommodation

26% = accommdation + transportation, not accommodation alone. Our key word here is’ accommodation’ and it is very much necessary to understand the clear and exact meaning of each question for true/false questions in general.

  • Pingback: IELTS Reading: Cambridge 13 Test 1 Reading Passage 2, Why being bored is stimulating and useful, too; with best solutions, explanations and bonus tips | IELTS Deal

Hlo sir muja heading ma bhut didn’t aa Rahe ba

Can you write that in English, please?

hi guys , i have a question is that if i use the word blockbusters instead of films , is it correct ?

blockbusters = films which have broken all sorts of records

It’s really very helpful.

I’m delighted to hear that. Thank you. Here’s my YouTube channel for your consideration: https://www.youtube.com/c/IELTSDeal

where are you from sir?

I’m from Bangladesh.

What is the main different between yesnong and truefalseng?

Thanks alot, this is really explanatory and I find it helpful

Welcome! You can follow my YouTube Channel as well: https://www.youtube.com/c/IELTSDeal/

In fact your website has been of a tremendous help to me. I understood true, false and not given from your website.. But I still need help in the other part too, writing listening n speaking My date is very close that is 2nd Dec n 5th

Thank you so much, it’s really helpful for me!!!

GREAT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

very helpful

  • Pingback: IELTS Reading: Cambridge 13 Reading Test 1; Passage 3; Artificial artists; with top solutions and explanations - IELTS Deal

Thanks for your clear explanation. It really helps to deal with reading tasks. I really appreciate you.

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IELTS General Training Reading: Test 2 Section 1; How to choose your builder & Island adventure activities; with complete solutions and best explanations

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Case Study: Tourism New Zealand Website Answers

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IELTS Academic Test – Passage 01: Case Study: Tourism New Zealand website reading with answers explanation, location and pdf. This reading paragraph has been taken from our huge collection of Academic & General Training (GT) Reading practice test PDF’s.

case-study-tourism-new-zealand-website-answers-PDF

Case Study: Tourism New Zealand website

New Zealand is a small country of four million inhabitants, a long-haul flight from all the major tourist-generating markets of the world. Tourism currently makes up 9% of the country’s gross domestic product, and is the country’s largest export sector. Unlike other export sectors, which make products and then sell them overseas, tourism brings its customers to New Zealand. The product is the country itself – the people, the places and the experiences. In 1999, Tourism New Zealand launched a campaign to communicate a new brand position to the world. The campaign focused on New Zealand’s scenic beauty, exhilarating outdoor activities and authentic Maori culture, and it made New Zealand one of the strongest national brands in the world.

A key feature of the campaign was the website www.newzealand.com, which provided potential visitors to New Zealand with a single gateway to everything the destination had to offer. The heart of the website was a database of tourism services operators, both those based in New Zealand and those based abroad which offered tourism services to the country. Any tourism-related business could be listed by filling in a simple form. This meant that even the smallest bed and breakfast address or specialist activity provider could gain a web presence with access to an audience of long-haul visitors. In addition, because participating businesses were able to update the details they gave on a regular basis, the information provided remained accurate. And to maintain and improve standards, Tourism New Zealand organised a scheme whereby organisations appearing on the website underwent an independent evaluation against a set of agreed national standards of quality. As part of this, the effect of each business on the environment was considered.

To communicate the New Zealand experience, the site also carried features relating to famous people and places. One of the most popular was an interview with former New Zealand All Blacks rugby captain Tana Umaga. Another feature that attracted a lot of attention was an interactive journey through a number of the locations chosen for blockbuster films which had made use of New Zealand’s stunning scenery as a backdrop. As the site developed, additional features were added to help independent travellers devise their own customised itineraries. To make it easier to plan motoring holidays, the site catalogued the most popular driving routes in the country, highlighting different routes according to the season and indicating distances and times.

Later a Travel Planner feature was added, which allowed visitors to click and ‘bookmark’ : paces or attractions they were interested in, and then view the results on a map. The Travel Planner offered suggested routes and public transport options between the chosen locations. There were also links to accommodation in the area. By registering with the website, users could save their Travel Plan and return to it later, or print it out take on the visit. The website also had a ‘Your Words’ section where anyone could submit a blog of their New Zealand travels for possible inclusion on the website.

The Tourism New Zealand website won two Webby awards for online achievement and innovation. More importantly perhaps, the growth of tourism to New Zealand was impressive. Overall tourism expenditure increased by an average of 6.9% per year between 1999 and 2004. From Britain, visits to New Zealand grew at an average annual rate of 13% between 2002 and 2006, compared to a rate of 4% overall for British visits abroad.

The website was set up to allow both individuals and travel organisations to create itineraries and travel packages to suit their own needs and interests. On the website, visitors can search for activities not solely by geographical location, but also by the particular nature of the activity. This is important as research shows that activities are the key driver of visitor satisfaction, contributing 74% to visitor satisfaction, while transport and accommodation account for the remaining 26%. The more activities that visitors undertake, the more satisfied they will be. It has also been found that visitors enjoy cultural activities most when they are interactive, such as visiting a marae (meeting ground) to learn about traditional Maori life. Many long-haul travellers enjoy such earning experiences, which provide them with stories to take home to their friends and family. In addition, it appears that visitors to New Zealand don’t want to be ‘one of the crowd’ and find activities that involve only a few people more special and meaningful.

It could be argued that New Zealand is not a typical destination. New Zealand is a small country with a visitor economy composed mainly of small businesses. It is generally perceived as a safe English-speaking country with a reliable transport infrastructure. Because of the long-haul flight, most visitors stay for longer (average 20 days) and want to see as much of the country as possible on what is often seen as a once-in-a-lifetime visit. However, the underlying lessons apply anywhere-the effectiveness of a strong brand, a strategy based on unique experiences and a comprehensive and user-friendly website.

Questions 1-7

Complete the table below. Choose  ONE WORD ONLY  from the passage for each answer. Write your answers in boxes 1-7 on your answer sheet.

Case Study: Tourism New Zealand Website Answers PDF

Questions 8-13

Do the following statements agree with the information given in Reading Passage 1? In boxes 8-13 on your answer sheet, write

TRUE                               if the statement agrees with the information FALSE                             if the statement contradicts the information NOT GIVEN                 if there is no information on this

8. The website www.newzealand.com aimed to provide ready-made itineraries and packages for travel companies and individual tourists.

9. It was found that most visitors started searching on the website by geographical location.

10. According to research, 26% of visitor satisfaction is related to their accommodation.

11. Visitors to New Zealand like to become involved in the local culture.

12. Visitors like staying in small hotels in New Zealand rather than in larger ones.

13. Many visitors feel it is unlikely that they will return to New Zealand after their visit.

________________

1) IELTS 13 READING PASSAGE – WHY BEING BORED IS STIMULATING ↗

2) IELTS 13 READING PASSAGE – ARTIFICIAL ARTISTS ↗

3) IELTS 13 READING PASSAGE – BRINGING CINNAMON TO EUROPE ↗

4) IELTS 13 READING PASSAGE – OXYTOCIN ↗

5) IELTS 13 READING PASSAGE – MAKING THE MOST OF TRENDS ↗

Case Study: Tourism New Zealand website Answers

Check out Case Study: Tourism New Zealand website reading answers below with explanations and locations given in the text.

  • ENVIRONMENT
  • ACCOMMODATION

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READING PASSAGE 1

You should spend about 20 minutes on Questions 1-13  which are based on Reading Passage 1 below.

Case Study: Tourism New Zealand website

New Zealand is a small country of four million inhabitants, a long-haul flight from all the major tourist-generating markets of the world. Tourism currently makes up 9% of the country’s gross domestic product, and is the country’s largest export sector. Unlike other export sectors, which make products and then sell them overseas, tourism brings its customers to New Zealand. The product is the country itself – the people, the places and the experiences. In 1999, Tourism New Zealand launched a campaign to communicate a new brand position to the world. The campaign focused on New Zealand’s scenic beauty, exhilarating outdoor activities and authentic Maori culture, and it made New Zealand one of the strongest national brands in the world.

A key feature of the campaign was the website www.newzealand.com, which provided potential visitors to New Zealand with a single gateway to everything the destination had to offer. The heart of the website was a database of tourism services operators, both those based in New Zealand and those based abroad which offered tourism service to the country. Any tourism-related business could be listed by filling in a simple form. This meant that even the smallest bed and breakfast address or specialist activity provider could gain a web presence with access to an audience of long-haul visitors. In addition, because participating businesses were able to update the details they gave on a regular basis, the information provided remained accurate. And to maintain and improve standards, Tourism New Zealand organised a scheme whereby organisations appearing on the website underwent an independent evaluation against a set of agreed national standards of quality. As part of this, the effect of each business on the environment was considered.

To communicate the New Zealand experience, the site also carried features relating to famous people and places. One of the most popular was an interview with former New Zealand All Blacks rugby captain Tana Umaga. Another feature that attracted a lot of attention was an interactive journey through a number of the locations chosen for blockbuster films which had made use of New Zealand’s stunning scenery as a backdrop. As the site developed, additional features were added to help independent travelers devise their own customised itineraries. To make it easier to plan motoring holidays, the site catalogued the most popular driving routes in the country, highlighting different routes according to the season and indicating distances and times.

Later, a Travel Planner feature was added, which allowed visitors to click and ‘bookmark’ places or attractions they were interested in, and then view the results on a map. The Travel Planner offered suggested routes and public transport options between the chosen locations. There were also links to accommodation in the area. By registering with the website, users could save their Travel Plan and return to it later, or print it out to take on the visit. The website also had a ‘Your Words’ section where anyone could submit a blog of their New Zealand travels for possible inclusion on the website.

The Tourism New Zealand website won two Webby awards for online achievement and innovation. More importantly perhaps, the growth of tourism to New Zealand was impressive. Overall tourism expenditure increased by an average of 6.9% per year between 1999 and 2004. From Britain, visits to New Zealand grew at an average annual rate of 13% between 2002 and 2006, compared to a rate of 4% overall for British visits abroad.

The website was set up to allow both individuals and travel organisations to create itineraries and travel packages to suit their own needs and interests. On the website, visitors can search for activities not solely by geographical location, but also by the particular nature of the activity. This is important as research shows that activities are the key driver of visitor satisfaction, contributing 74% to visitor satisfaction, while transport and accommodation account for the remaining 26%. The more activities that visitors undertake, the more satisfied they will be. It has also been found that visitors enjoy cultural activities most when they are interactive, such as visiting a marae (meeting ground) to learn about traditional Maori life. Many long-haul travelers enjoy such learning experiences, which provide them with stories to take home to their friends and family. In addition, it appears that visitors to New Zealand don’t want to be ‘one of the crowd’ and find activities that involve only a few people more special and meaningful.

It could be argued that New Zealand is not a typical destination. New Zealand is a small country with a visitor economy composed mainly of small businesses. It is generally perceived as a safe English-speaking country with a reliable transport infrastructure. Because of the long-haul flight, most visitors stay for longer (average 20 days) and want to see as much of the country as possible on what is often seen as a once-in-a-lifetime visit. However, the underlying lessons apply anywhere – the effectiveness of a strong brand, a strategy based on unique experiences and a comprehensive and user-friendly website.

Questions 1-7

Complete the table below. Choose ONE WORD ONLY from the passage for each answer.

Write your answers in boxes 1-7 on your answer sheet.

  Questions 8-13

Do the following statements agree with the information given in Reading Passage 1?

In boxes 8-13 on your answer sheet, write

TRUE                if the statement agrees with the information

FALSE               if the statement contradicts the information

NOT GIVEN     if there is no information on this

8    The website www.newzealand.com aimed to provide ready-made itineraries and packages for travel companies and individual tourists.

9    It was found that most visitors started searching on the website by geographical location.

10    According to research, 26% of visitor satisfaction is related to their accommodation.

11    Visitors to New Zealand like to become involved in the local culture.

12    Visitors like staying in small hotels in New Zealand rather than in larger ones.

13    Many visitors feel it is unlikely that they will return to New Zealand after their visit.

case study tourism new zealand reading answer

READING PASSAGE 2

You should spend about 20 minutes on Questions 14-26  which are based on Reading Passage 2 below.  

Why being bored is stimulating – and useful, too

This most common of emotions is turning out to be more interesting than we thought

We all know how it feels – it’s impossible to keep your mind on anything, time stretches out, and all the things you could do seem equally unlikely to make you feel better. But defining boredom so that it can be studied in the lab has proved difficult. For a start, it can include a lot of other mental states, such as frustration, apathy, depression and indifference. There isn’t even agreement over whether boredom is always a low-energy, flat kind of emotion or whether feeling agitated and restless counts as boredom, too. In his book, Boredom: A Lively History , Peter Toohey at the University of Calgary, Canada, compares it to disgust – an emotion that motivates us to stay away from certain situations. ‘If disgust protects humans from infection, boredom may protect them from “infectious” social situations,’ he suggests.

By asking people about their experiences of boredom, Thomas Goetz and his team at the University of Konstanz in Germany have recently identified five distinct types: indifferent, calibrating, searching, reactant and apathetic. These can be plotted on two axes – one running left to right, which measures low to high arousal, and the other from top to bottom, which measures how positive or negative the feeling is. Intriguingly, Goetz has found that while people experience all kinds of boredom, they tend to specialise in one. Of the five types, the most damaging is ‘reactant’ boredom with its explosive combination of high arousal and negative emotion. The most useful is what Goetz calls ‘indifferent’ boredom: someone isn’t engaged in anything satisfying but still feels relaxed and calm. However, it remains to be seen whether there are any character traits that predict the kind of boredom each of us might be prone to.

Psychologist Sandi Mann at the University of Central Lancashire, UK, goes further. ‘All emotions are there for a reason, including boredom,’ she says. Mann has found that being bored makes us more creative. ‘We’re all afraid of being bored but in actual fact it can lead to all kinds of amazing things,’ she says. In experiments published last year, Mann found that people who had been made to feel bored by copying numbers out of the phone book for 15 minutes came up with more creative ideas about how to use a polystyrene cup than a control group. Mann concluded that a passive, boring activity is best for creativity because it allows the mind to wander. In fact, she goes so far as to suggest that we should seek out more boredom in our lives.

Psychologist John Eastwood at York University in Toronto, Canada, isn’t convinced. ‘If you are in a state of mind-wandering you are not bored,’ he says. ‘In my view, by definition boredom is an undesirable state.’ That doesn’t necessarily mean that it isn’t adaptive, he adds. ‘Pain is adaptive – if we didn’t have physical pain, bad things would happen to us. Does that mean that we should actively cause pain? No. But even if boredom has evolved to help us survive, it can still be toxic if allowed to fester.’ For Eastwood, the central feature of boredom is a failure to put our ‘attention system’ into gear. This causes an inability to focus on anything, which makes time seem to go painfully slowly. What’s more, your efforts to improve the situation can end up making you feel worse. ‘People try to connect with the world and if they are not successful there’s that frustration and irritability,’ he says. Perhaps most worryingly, says Eastwood, repeatedly failing to engage attention can lead to state where we don’t know what to do any more, and no longer care.

Eastwood’s team is now trying to explore why the attention system fails. It’s early days but they think that at least some of it comes down to personality. Boredom proneness has been linked with a variety of traits. People who are motivated by pleasure seem to suffer particularly badly. Other personality traits, such as curiosity, are associated with a high boredom threshold. More evidence that boredom has detrimental effects comes from studies of people who are more or less prone to boredom. It seems those who bore easily face poorer prospects in education, their career and even life in general. But of course, boredom itself cannot kill – it’s the things we do to deal with it that may put us in danger. What can we do to alleviate it before it comes to that? Goetz’s group has one suggestion. Working with teenagers, they found that those who ‘approach’ a boring situation – in other words, see that it’s boring and get stuck in anyway – report less boredom than those who try to avoid it by using snacks, TV or social media for distraction.

Psychologist Francoise Wemelsfelder speculates that our over-connected lifestyles might even be a new source of boredom. ‘In modern human society there is a lot of overstimulation but still a lot of problems finding meaning,’ she says. So instead of seeking yet more mental stimulation, perhaps we should leave our phones alone, and use boredom to motivate us to engage with the world in a more meaningful way.

Questions 14-19

Reading Passage 2 has six paragraphs, A-F Choose the correct heading for each paragraph from the list of headings below.

Write the correct number, i-viii , in boxes 14-19 on your answer sheet.

List of Headings

i            The productive outcomes that may result from boredom

ii           What teachers can do to prevent boredom 

iii          A new explanation and a new cure for boredom

iv          Problems with a scientific approach to boredom

v          A potential danger arising from boredom

vi          Creating a system of classification for feelings of boredom

vii         Age groups most affected by boredom

viii        Identifying those most affected by boredom

14    Paragraph A

15    Paragraph B

16    Paragraph C

17    Paragraph D

18    Paragraph E

19    Paragraph F

Questions 20-23

Look at the following people (Questions 20-23 ) and the list of ideas below.

Match each person with the correct idea, A-E .

Write the correct letter, A-E , in boxes 20-23 on your answer sheet.

20    Peter Toohey

21    Thomas Goetz

22    John Eastwood

23    Francoise Wemelsfelder

List of Ideas

A      The way we live today may encourage boredom.

B      One sort of boredom is worse than all the others.

C      Levels of boredom may fall in the future.

D      Trying to cope with boredom can increase its negative effects.

E      Boredom may encourage us to avoid an unpleasant experience.

Questions 24-26

Complete the summary below. Choose ONE WORD ONLY from the passage for each answer.

Write your answers in boxes 24-26 on your answer sheet.

Responses to boredom

For John Eastwood, the central feature of boredom is that people cannot 24 ……………………………, due to a failure in what he calls the ‘attention system’, and as a result they become frustrated and irritable. His team suggests that those for whom 25 ……………………….. is an important aim in life may have problems in coping with boredom, whereas those who have the characteristic of 26 ……………………….. can generally cope with it.

READING PASSAGE 3

You should spend about 20 minutes on Questions 27-40 which are based on Reading Passage 3 below.

Artificial artist?

Can computers really create works of art.

The Painting Fool is one of a growing number of computer programs which, so their makers claim, possess creative talents. Classical music by an artificial composer has had audiences enraptured, and even tricked them into believing a human was behind the score. Artworks painted by a robot have sold for thousands of dollars and been hung in prestigious galleries. And software has been built which creates are that could not have been imagined by the programmer.

Human beings are the only species to perform sophisticated creative acts regularly. If we can break this process down into computer code, where does that leave human creativity? ‘This is a question at the very core of humanity,’ says Geraint Wiggins, a computational creativity researcher at Goldsmiths, University of London. ‘It scares a lot of people. They are worried that it is taking something special away from what it means to be human.’

To some extent, we are all familiar with computerised art. The question is: where does the work of the artist stop and the creativity of the computer begin? Consider one of the oldest machine artists, Aaron, a robot that has had paintings exhibited in London’s Tate Modern and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Aaron can pick up a paintbrush and paint on canvas on its own. Impressive perhaps, but it is still little more than a tool to realise the programmer’s own creative ideas.

Simon Colton, the designer of the Painting Fool, is keen to make sure his creation doesn’t attract the same criticism. Unlike earlier ‘artists’ such as Aaron, the Painting Fool only needs minimal direction and can come up with its own concepts by going online for material. The software runs its own web searches and trawls through social media sites. It is now beginning to display a kind of imagination too, creating pictures from scratch. One of its original works is a series of fuzzy landscapes, depicting trees and sky. While some might say they have a mechanical look, Colton argues that such reactions arise from people’s double standards towards software-produced and human-produced art. After all, he says, consider that the Painting Fool painted the landscapes without referring to a photo. ‘If a child painted a new scene from its head, you’d say it has a certain level of imagination,’ he points out. ‘The same should be true of a machine.’ Software bugs can also lead to unexpected results. Some of the Painting Fool’s paintings of a chair came out in black and white, thanks to a technical glitch. This gives the work an eerie, ghostlike quality. Human artists like the renowned Ellsworth Kelly are lauded for limiting their colour palette – so why should computers be any different?

Researchers like Colton don’t believe it is right to measure machine creativity directly to that of humans who ‘have had millennia to develop our skills’. Others, though, are fascinated by the prospect that a computer might create something as original and subtle as our best artists. So far, only one has come close. Composer David Cope invented a program called Experiments in Musical Intelligence, or EMI. Not only did EMI create compositions in Cope’s style, but also that of the most revered classical composers, including Bach, Chopin and Mozart. Audiences were moved to tears, and EMI even fooled classical music experts into thinking they were hearing genuine Bach. Not everyone was impressed however. Some, such as Wiggins, have blasted Cope’s work as pseudoscience, and condemned him for his deliberately vague explanation of how the software worked. Meanwhile, Douglas Hofstadter of Indiana University said EMI created replicas which still rely completely on the original artist’s creative impulses. When audiences found out the truth they were often outraged with Cope, and one music lover even tried to punch him. Amid such controversy, Cope destroyed EMI’s vital databases.

But why did so many people love the music, yet recoil when the discovered how it was composed? A study by computer scientist David Moffat of Glasgow Caledonian University provides a clue. He asked both expert musicians and non-experts to assess six compositions. The participants weren’t told beforehand whether the tunes were composed by humans or computers, but were asked to guess, and then rate how much they liked each one. People who thought the composer was a computer tended to dislike the piece more than those who believed it was human. This was true even among the experts, who might have been expected to be more objective in their analyses.

Where does this prejudice come from? Paul Bloom of Yale University has a suggestion: he reckons part of the pleasure we get from art stems from the creative process behind the work. This can give it an ‘irresistible essence’, says Bloom. Meanwhile, experiments by Justin Kruger of New York University have shown that people’s enjoyment of an artwork increases if they think more time and effort was needed to create it. Similarly, Colton thinks that when people experience art, they wonder what the artist might have been thinking or what the artist is trying to tell them. It seems obvious, therefore, that with computers producing art, this speculation is cut short – there’s nothing to explore. But as technology becomes increasingly complex, finding those greater depths in computer art could become possible. This is precisely why Colton asks the Painting Fool to tap into online social networks for its inspiration: hopefully this way it will choose themes that will already be meaningful to us.

Questions 27-31

Choose the correct letter, A , B , C or D .

Write the correct letter in boxes 27-31 on your answer sheet.

27    What is the writer suggesting about computer-produced works in the first paragraph?

A    People’s acceptance of them can vary considerably.

B    A great deal of progress has already been attained in this field.

C    They have had more success in some artistic genres than in others.

D    the advances are not as significant as the public believes them to be.

28    According to Geraint Wiggins, why are many people worried by computer art?

A    It is aesthetically inferior to human art.

B    It may ultimately supersede human art.

C    It undermines a fundamental human quality.

D    It will lead to a deterioration in human ability.

29    What is a key difference between Aaron and the Painting Fool?

A    its programmer’s background

B    public response to its work

C    the source of its subject matter

D    the technical standard of its output

30    What point does Simon Colton make in the fourth paragraph?

A    Software-produced art is often dismissed as childish and simplistic.

B    The same concepts of creativity should not be applied to all forms of art.

C    It is unreasonable to expect a machine to be as imaginative as a human being.

D    People tend to judge computer art and human art according to different criteria.

31    The writer refers to the paintings of a chair as an example of computer art which

A    achieves a particularly striking effect.

B    exhibits a certain level of genuine artistic skill.

C    closely resembles that of a well-known artist.

D    highlights the technical limitations of the software.

Questions 32-37

Complete each sentence with the correct ending, A-G below.

Write the correct letter, A-G , in boxes 32-37 on your answer sheet.

32    Simon Colton says it is important to consider the long-term view then

33    David Cope’s EMI software surprised people by

34    Geraint Wiggins criticized Cope for not

35    Douglas Hofstadter claimed that EMI was

36    Audiences who had listened to EMI’s music became angry after

37    The participants in David Moffat’s study had to assess music without

A      generating work that was virtually indistinguishable from that of humans.

B      knowing whether it was the work of humans or software.

C      producing work entirely dependent on the imagination of its creator.

D      comparing the artistic achievements of humans and computers.

E      revealing the technical details of his program.

F      persuading the public to appreciate computer art.

G     discovering that it was the product of a computer program

Questions 38-40

Do the following statements agree with the claims of the writer in Reading Passage 3?

In boxes 38-40 on your answer sheet, write

YES                   if the statement agrees with the claims of the writer

NO                    if the statement contradicts the claims of the writer

NOT GIVEN     if it is impossible to say what the writer thinks about this

38    Moffat’s research may help explain people’s reactions to EMI.

39    The non-experts in Moffat’s study all responded in a predictable way.

40    Justin Kruger’s findings cast doubt on Paul Bloom’s theory about people’s prejudice towards computer art.

IELTS Reading Recent Actual Test 01

Cambridge ielts 13 reading test 02, answer cambridge ielts 13 reading test 01.

2. environment

6. accommodation

9. NOT GIVEN

12. NOT GIVEN

25. pleasure

26. curiosity

39. NOT GIVEN

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case study tourism new zealand reading answer

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Case Study Tourism New Zealand Website – IELTS Reading Answers

Smruti Das

10 min read

Updated On Feb 13, 2024

case study tourism new zealand reading answer

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Case Study Tourism New Zealand Website – IELTS Reading Answers

Recent IELTS Reading Test with Answers - Free PDF

The IELTS Reading Module offers a fantastic chance to achieve excellent scores. It assesses a candidate’s reading comprehension skills in English. You must comprehend the various question types in order to perform at your best in this area. Ideally, you should not spend more than 20 minutes on a passage.

The Academic passage, Case Study Tourism New Zealand Website reading answers, appeared in an IELTS Test. Try to find the answers to get an idea of the difficulty level of the passages in the actual reading test. If you want more passages to solve, try taking one of our IELTS reading practice tests.

Let’s see how easy this passage is for you and if you can solve it in 20 minutes.

The question types found in this passage are:

  • Table Completion (Q. 1-7)
  • True/False/Not Given (Q 8-13)

Do you want to revise the steps to solve the Matching Features questions for IELTS Academic Reading?

Check out IELTS Reading Matching Features Questions !

Reading Passage

Case Study: Tourism New Zealand Website 

A New Zealand is a small country of four million inhabitants, a long-haul flight from all the major tourist-generating markets of the world. Tourism currently makes up 9% of the country’s gross domestic product and is the country’s largest export sector. Unlike other export sectors, which make products and then sell them overseas, tourism brings its customers to New Zealand. The product is the country itself – the people, the places, and the experiences. In 1999, Tourism New Zealand launched a campaign to communicate a new brand position to the world. The campaign focused on New Zealand’s scenic beauty, exhilarating outdoor activities and authentic Maori culture, and it made New Zealand one of the strongest national brands in the world.

B A key feature of the campaign was the website www.newzealand.com, which provided potential visitors to New Zealand with a single gateway to everything the destination had to offer. The heart of the website was a database of tourism services operators, both those based in New Zealand and those based abroad which offered tourism service to the country. Any tourism-related business could be listed by filling in a simple form. This meant that even the smallest bed and breakfast address or specialist activity provider could gain a web presence with access to an audience of long-haul visitors. In addition, because participating businesses were able to update the details they gave on a regular basis, the information provided remained accurate. And to maintain and improve standards, Tourism New Zealand organised a scheme whereby organisations appearing on the website underwent an independent evaluation against a set of agreed national standards of quality. As part of this, the effect of each business on the environment was considered.

C To communicate the New Zealand experience, the site also carried features relating to famous people and places. One of the most popular was an interview with former New Zealand All Blacks rugby captain Tana Umaga. Another feature that attracted a lot of attention was an interactive journey through a number of the locations chosen for blockbuster films which had made use of New Zealand’s stunning scenery as a backdrop. As the site developed, additional features were added to help independent travelers devise their own customised itineraries. To make it easier to plan motoring holidays, the site catalogued the most popular driving routes in the country, highlighting different routes according to the season and indicating distances and times.

D Later, a Travel Planner feature was added, which allowed visitors to click and ‘bookmark’ places or attractions they were interested in, and then view the results on a map. The Travel Planner offered suggested routes and public transport options between the chosen locations. There were also links to accommodation in the area. By registering with the website, users could save their Travel Plan and return to it later, or print it out to take on the visit. The website also had a ‘Your Words’ section where anyone could submit a blog of their New Zealand travels for possible inclusion on the website.

E The Tourism New Zealand website won two Webby awards for online achievement and innovation. More importantly perhaps, the growth of tourism to New Zealand was impressive. Overall tourism expenditure increased by an average of 6.9% per year between 1999 and 2004. From Britain, visits to New Zealand grew at an average annual rate of 13% between 2002 and 2006, compared to a rate of 4% overall for British visits abroad.

F The website was set up to allow both individuals and travel organizations to create itineraries and travel packages to suit their own needs and interests. On the website, visitors can search for activities not solely by geographical location, but also by the particular nature of the activity. This is important as research shows that activities are the key driver of visitor satisfaction, contributing 74% to visitor satisfaction, while transport and accommodation account for the remaining 26%. The more activities that visitors undertake, the more satisfied they will be. It has also been found that visitors enjoy cultural activities most when they are interactive, such as visiting a marae (meeting ground) to learn about traditional Maori life. Many long-haul travelers enjoy such learning experiences, which provide them with stories to take home to their friends and family. In addition, it appears that visitors to New Zealand don’t want to be ‘one of the crowd’ and find activities that involve only a few people more special and meaningful.

G It could be argued that New Zealand is not a typical destination. New Zealand is a small country with a visitor economy composed mainly of small businesses. It is generally perceived as a safe English-speaking country with reliable transport infrastructure. Because of the long-haul flight, most visitors stay for longer (average 20 days) and want to see as much of the country as possible on what is often seen as a once-in-a-lifetime visit. However, the underlying lessons apply anywhere – the effectiveness of a strong brand, a strategy based on unique experiences and a comprehensive and user-friendly website.

Questions 1-7

Questions 8-13.

Do the following statements agree with the information given in Reading Passage?

In boxes 8-13 on your answer sheet, write –

TRUE if the statement agrees with the information, FALSE if the statement contradicts the information, NOT GIVEN if there is no information on this.

8 The website www.newzealand.com aimed to provide ready-made itineraries and packages for travel companies and individual tourists.

9 It was found that most visitors started searching on the website by geographical location.

10 According to research, 26% of visitor satisfaction is related to their accommodation.

11 Visitors to New Zealand like to become involved in the local culture.

12 Visitors like staying in small hotels in New Zealand rather than in larger ones.

13 Many visitors feel it is unlikely that they will return to New Zealand after their visit.

‘ Case Study Tourism New Zealand website ’ IELTS Reading Answers With Location and Explanation 

1  Answer: update

Question type: Table Completion

Answer location: Paragraph B

Answer explanation: It is mentioned in the 8th and 9th lines that, “In addition, because participating businesses were able to update the details they gave on a regular basis….”.

2 Answer: environment

Answer explanation: It is mentioned in the last line that, “As part of this, the effect of each business on the environment was considered.”

3 Answer: Captain

Answer location: Paragraph C

Answer explanation: It is mentioned in the 1-3 lines that, “….One of the most popular was an interview with former New Zealand All Blacks rugby captain Tana Umaga.”

4 Answer: films

Answer explanation: It is mentioned in the 4th and 5th lines that, “…… was an interactive journey through a number of locations chosen for blockbuster films …….”.

5 Answer: season

Answer explanation: It is mentioned in the 8th and 9th lines that, “…. the site catalogued the most popular driving routes in the country, highlighting different routes according to the season…..”.

6 Answer: accommodation

Answer location: Paragraph D

Answer explanation: It is mentioned in the 4th line that, “….. There were also links to accommodation in the area.”

7 Answer: blog

Answer explanation: It is mentioned in the 6th and 7th lines that, “ ….. The website also had a ‘Your Words’ section where anyone could submit a blog of their New Zealand travels for possible inclusion on the website.”

8 Answer: FALSE

Question type: TRUE/FALSE/NOT GIVEN

Answer location: Paragraph F

Answer explanation: The response lies in Paragraph 6. The initial two lines indicate that the website’s purpose was to empower individuals and travel organizations to create their own travel plans. The website did not offer pre-packaged itineraries and travel packages.

This assertion directly opposes the information in the passage.

Hence, the answer is FALSE.

9 Answer: NOT GIVEN

Answer explanation: The answer cannot be located within the text. The question pertains to initiating a search on the website.

In Paragraph 6, line 3, the author mentions, “…visitors can search for activities not solely by geographical locations, but also by the particular nature of the activity.” However, there is no information provided regarding how to start a search.

As a result, the answer is NOT GIVEN.

10 Answer: FALSE

Answer explanation: The answer can be found in lines 4, 5, and 6 of paragraph 6.

In these lines, it is evident that the question is contradicted. Transportation and lodging makeup 26%, while visitor satisfaction makes up 74%. If only lodging constituted 26%, we could affirm that it is TRUE.

Therefore, the correct answer is FALSE.

11 Answer: TRUE

Answer explanation: It is mentioned in lines 7-9 that, “…. It has also been found that visitors enjoy cultural activities most when they are interactive, such as visiting a marae (meeting ground) to learn more about traditional life.”

12 Answer: NOT GIVEN

Answer location: Paragraphs F & G

Answer explanation: Staying in hotels is not discussed, and there is also no comparison made between small and large hotels.

Therefore, the answer is NOT GIVEN.

13 Answer: TRUE

Answer location: Paragraph G

Answer explanation: It is mentioned in the 4th and 5th lines that, “Because of the long-haul flight, most visitors stay for longer (average 20 days) and want to see as much of the country as possible on what is often seen as a once-in-a-lifetime visit.”

Tips for Answering the Question Types in the ‘Case Study Tourism New Zealand website’ IELTS Reading Answers

Let us check out some quick tips to answer the types of questions in the ‘Case Study: Tourism New Zealand website’ Reading Answers passage.

Table Completion:

The way to solve the table completion questions of the IELTS Reading is similar to Summary Completion. You will be asked to fill in the blanks in a small passage given in the form of a note with the relevant words or numbers. So, let us revise the strategies.

  • Read the instructions carefully. It will help you determine the word limit (no more than two, one word, etc.) and important terms like ‘using words from the text’ or ‘from the text’. You have to follow these strictly.
  • Go through the incomplete table first. Also, think about keywords and how they could be represented by synonyms or paraphrasing.
  • Locate where the information is by scanning quickly . If you can’t, move on.
  • Study the reading text by using the skimming and scanning techniques . It will help to establish the answer quickly. When scanning for your answer, make sure you are thinking about paraphrasing and synonyms.
  • The answers appear in the same order as the questions . Also, check your spelling and remember that your answer should be grammatically correct.

True/False/Not Given

In IELTS Reading , ‘True, False, Not Given’ questions are based on facts. Several factual statements will be provided to you, and it is up to you to determine whether or not they are accurate by reading the text.

To answer this type of question, you can use the following strategies:

  • Read the question and identify the keywords – Before reading the material, have a look at your list of True, False, and Not Given questions.
  • Scan the passage for synonyms or paraphrased words of the keywords – When you have highlighted the keywords, swiftly read the text to look for paraphrases or synonyms.
  • Match the highlighted words in the questions with their synonyms in the text – Once you find both sets of keywords, cross-check them to find the answer.

Identify the answer – If the facts match, the answer is TRUE, and in case it doesn’t match, it is FALSE. If you are unable to find the answer or unsure of it, mark it NOT GIVEN.

Great work on attempting to solve the ‘Case Study: Tourism New Zealand website’ IELTS reading passage! To crack your IELTS Reading in the first go, try solving more of the Recent IELTS Reading Passages.

Also, check :

  • In Praise Of Amateurs IELTS Reading Answers
  • The True Cost Of Food Reading Answers
  • Climate Change And The Inuit Reading Answers
  • Zoo Conservation Programmes Reading Answers
  • A Workaholic Economy Reading Answers

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Smruti Das

Smruti is a passionate and highly skilled content writer working in this field for the past 2 years. She is known for her ability to craft compelling and engaging content. With a keen eye for detail and a deep love for words, Smruti has expertized herself with the latest industry trends. Her commitment to producing high-quality content that resonates with audiences is highly valued.

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Tourism New Zealand Website Case Study Reading Answers

Tourism New Zealand Website Case Study Reading Answers : Way to Boost Your IELTS Preparation

For now, we have talked a lot about the speaking & listening sections of the IELTS examination. Today, let’s move forward to know more about the IELTS reading section.

The IELTS reading section is an extremely important yet tough exams but it is not possible for one to not crack it in time. All you need is the right reading practice and by that we mean, a lot of it to make sure that you do not cease anywhere while you’re giving the exam during the final attempt. Along with this, you need to tackle a lot of reading passage’s questions and increase your difficulty level every day to make sure that you are easily able to solve all these questions, no matter what type or any sort of questions you’re presented with.

So, today let’s move forward to know more about it.

Case Study Tourism New Zealand Website Reading Answers

The IELTS reading passage topic: Tourism New Zealand Website” is a very common yet interesting topic in the IELTS examination. In the sections below, this topic is divided into different parts to help you practice in a better yet easy manner for this passage.

Tourism New Zealand Website IELTS Reading Answers: Part 1

New Zealand is a small country with a minimum of just four million inhabitants that are spread across the country in a peaceful manner.

Currently, the total GDP of the country has the highest percentage of tourism in it. Tourism contributes to making up to 9% of this country’s GDP and is the largest export sector of the country. Unlike all the other export sectors, tourism is one such sector in this country which helps to bring a lot of its customers to this country. And while we talk about the other products of this country – they are just people, places, and the experiences that are taken out of it.

In the year 1999, Tourism New Zealand launched a great campaign which was there to help communicate a new brand position to the world. This campaign focused on New Zealand’s scenic beauty, its exhilarating outdoor activities and the authentic Maori culture that is being followed here which helps in making it the most powerful yet the strongest brands in the world.

ALSO, READ What is a Good IELTS Score? Is 7.5 a Good IELTS Score? Here’s All You Need to Know

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Tourism New Zealand Website IELTS Reading Answers: Part 2

A key feature of this campaign was the website that was launched during this period for this country, www.newzealand.com. This website helped in providing great potential visitors to the country with a single gateway to each and everything that the destination had to offer to its people.

But the heart of the business is the database of tourism services operators, both of which are based in New Zealand as well as abroad which helps in providing great tourism services to the country. So, any tourism-related form can be filled easily without taking anybody’s help at all. Further, to maintain the standards and improve them, Tourism New Zealand organised a scheme with the help of which organisations that appear on the website underwent an independent evaluation against a set of the national standards of quality that they all agreed on. And due to this, the effect it had on each of the businesses was considered too.

Tourism New Zealand Website IELTS Reading Answers: Part 3

Further, to communicate the New Zealand experience, this site also carried forward various features related to the famous people and places which was one of the most popular interviews that this country had with the former New Zealand All Blacks Rugby Captain “Tana Umaga.”

Another such feature that helped in increasing a lot of attention towards his country is through the help of those blockbuster films that were made here which helps in providing people with an interactive journey through a number of some amazing yet extremely beautiful locations.

A Travel Planner feature was also added to this list which helped the visitors to click and bookmark the places of attraction for them so that when they visit this country, they’ll have a long list of places to roam around. This planner also helps in suggesting routes and public transport options to the readers in order to easily choose between the locations that they have chosen for them.

Also Read: The Life Cycle of a Star: An IELTS Reading Answers Topic with Questions Solved

Tourism New Zealand Website IELTS Reading Answers: Part 4

New Zealand is not just any typical destination where people could come and roam around; it’s an emotion, a feeling for all those four million people residing here. New Zealand is just a small & pretty country with little less population in it and it creates a visitor economy for the tourists which is generally composed of small businesses. It is generally perceived as a safe English-speaking country with reliable transport infrastructure. And because of the long-haul flights, most visitors have to stay for a long period of time in this country, let’s say, for about a period of 20 days so that they can see as much of the country as is possible for them on a one-time long visit to this country.

Tourism New Zealand Website IELTS Reading Questions

Complete the table below.

Choose ONE WORD ONLY from the passage for each answer.

Write your answers in boxes 1-7 on your answer sheet.

#1. Easy for Tourism-related business to get on the list

#2. Allowed businesses to _____________ information regularly

#3. Provided a countrywide evaluation of businesses, including their impact on the _________________

#4. Special features on local topics

Example – an interview with a former sports _________________, and an interactive tour of various locations used in ____________________________

#5. Information on driving routes that varied depending on the ___________________________

#6. Travel Planner • included a map showing selected places, details of public transport and local ________________

#7. ‘Your Words’ • travelers could send a link to their ________________________

#2. Environment

#3. Captain

#6. Accommodation

Do the following statements agree with the information given in Reading Passage 1?

In boxes 8-13 on your answer sheet, mention

TRUE – if the statement agrees with the information

FALSE – if the statement contradicts the information

NOT GIVEN – if there is no information on this

#8. The website “ www.newzealand.com ” created by the tourism department of New Zealand has been aiming to provide some great deals, itineraries, and good-deal packages for the travel companies as well as for all those travel enthusiasts.

#9. Many of the visitors out of these were found to be searching for the information that they want on the official website by the geographical location of the area.

#10. According to research, 26% of visitor satisfaction is related to their accommodation.

#11. Many-a-times, it has been noticed that many of the visitors to this country become more involved in the local culture of the country and enjoy it a lot.

#12. Many visitors like staying in small hotels as they like the vibe of such hotels a lot rather than those big, grand, and new ones recently built in the country.

#13. Visitors feel it unlikely to return to the country after their first visit here.

#9. Not Given

#12. Not Given

IELTS Preparation Tips: Reading Section

#1.the two “s”.

By the two S here, we mean Skimming and Scanning, that is to skim and scan the lines of the passage. This requires an individual to go through the reading passage in order to get a general understanding of the content and what could be the answers to the questions that follow behind it.

#2.Good Reading Speed

While practising for the IELTS reading section, an individual is asked to read as many passages as he/she can in order to increase their reading speed. This can further help an individual a lot in the future.

#3.Don’t Understand the Full Passage

While sitting in the exam hall, the aim of an individual should not be to understand the entire passage completely because this will put the ability to answer the questions in a timely manner to the test. And after all, your only aim should be to just find the correct answers to the questions.

After reading the above paragraph, we hope that you might have understood it well and have got an idea of how you can further solve the questions related to it or find out the different answers for the various questions being provided. If you have any doubts in your mind regarding the same, just feel free to comment down below and let us know all about it so that we can help you with that in the future because we’ll be more than happy to help you out through this.

Also, if you want more help in any of these reading passages, don’t forget to just check out our other blogs that will help you with the same.

Also Read: The Nature and Aims of Archaeology: Find Reading Answers for IELTS Reading Test

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‘Case study: Tourism New Zealand website’- Reading Answer Explanation- CAM- 13

case study tourism new zealand reading answer

Here are explanations of the Questions of passage named ‘Case study: Tourism New Zealand website’, which is from the Cambridge 13 book. The Questions that have been asked are True/False/Not Given and Blanks. You will find the locations of the Reading Answers, Keywords( highlighted and underlined) and justifications.  

READING PASSAGE 1: Case Study: Tourism New Zealand website

Questions 1-7

Complete the table below. Choose  ONE WORD ONLY  from the passage for each answer.

Write your answers in boxes  1-7  on your answer sheet.

Questions 8-13

Do the following statements agree with the information given in Reading Passage 1?

In boxes  8-13  on your answer sheet, write

TRUE                if the statement agrees with the information

FALSE               if the statement contradicts the information

NOT GIVEN     if there is no information on this

8    The website www.newzealand.com aimed to provide ready-made itineraries and packages for travel companies and individual tourists.

Location: 6 th paragraph

Explanation: The main keyword ‘ready-made itineraries’ helps to locate the answer in the first line of the paragraph. ‘The website was set up to allow both individuals and travel organisations to create itineraries and travel packages to suit their own needs and interests…’The question statement contradicts the passage statement. ‘Create itineraries’ is opposite to the ‘ready-made itineraries’. Thus, the answer is very clear.

Answer: False

9    It was found that most visitors started searching on the website by geographical location.

Explanation: The answer to this question is in the second line of the passage. ‘Visitors can search for activities not solely by geographical location, but also by the particular nature of the activity…’Here, the writer does not give information about the starting of search. Hence, no information available.

Answer: Not Given

10    According to research, 26% of visitor satisfaction is related to their accommodation.

Explanation: The main keyword ‘visitor satisfaction’ is in the fourth line of the paragraph. ‘Visitor satisfaction, contributing 74% to visitor satisfaction, while transport and accommodation account for the remaining 26%…’Here, transportation and accommodation account for 26%.But in question statement 26% accounts for accommodation only. Thus, the answer is False.

11    Visitors to New Zealand like to become involved in the local culture. Location: 6 th paragraph

Explanation: The location of the answer is in the middle line of the paragraph. ‘It has also been found that visitors enjoy cultural activities most when they are interactive…’Here,  ‘like to become involved in’ is visible as ‘enjoy cultural activities…’Thus, the answer is clear.

Answer: True

12    Visitors like staying in small hotels in New Zealand rather than in larger ones.

Location: Last paragraph

Explanation: Though the writer talks about the visitors in New Zealand. But there is no information regarding hotels in the New Zealand. Thus, no information available.

13    Many visitors feel it is unlikely that they will return to New Zealand after their visit.

Explanation: The location of the answer is in the second last line of the paragraph. ‘Because of the long-haul flight, most visitors stay for longer (average 20 days) and want to see as much of the country as possible on what is often seen as a once-in-a-lifetime visit…’Here, ‘often seen as a once-in-a-lifetime visit…’ makes it clear that there is less possibility  that they will return.   Thus, the answer is True.

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Test 1: case study: tourism new zealand website.

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case study tourism new zealand reading answer

Case study tourism New Zealand website Reading Ielts Answers and Questions

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  • IELTS Reading True/False/Not given

case study tourism new zealand reading answer

Case study tourism New Zealand website

New Zealand is a small country of four million inhabitants, a long-haul flight from all the major tourist-generating markets of the world. Tourism currently makes up 9% of the country’s gross domestic product and is the country’s largest export sector. Unlike other export sectors, which make products and then sell them overseas, tourism brings its customers to New Zealand. The product is the country itself – the people, the places and the experiences. In 1999, Tourism New Zealand launched a campaign to communicate a new brand position to the world. The campaign focused on New Zealand’s scenic beauty, exhilarating outdoor activities and authentic Maori culture, and it made New Zealand one of the strongest national brands in the world.

A key feature of the campaign was the website www.newzealand.com, which provided potential visitors to New Zealand with a single gateway to everything the destination had to offer. The heart of the website was a database of tourism services operators, both those based in New Zealand and those based abroad which offered tourism services to the country. Any tourism-related business could be listed by filling in a simple form. This meant that even the smallest bed and breakfast address or specialist activity provider could gain a web presence with access to an audience of long-haul visitors. In addition, because participating businesses were able to update the details they gave on a regular basis, the information provided remained accurate. And to maintain and improve standards, Tourism New Zealand organized a scheme whereby organizations appearing on the website underwent an independent evaluation against a set of agreed national standards of quality. As part of this, the effect of each business on the environment was considered.

To communicate the New Zealand experience, the site also carried features relating to famous people and places. One of the most popular was an interview with former New Zealand All Blacks rugby captain Tana Umaga. Another feature that attracted a lot of attention was an interactive journey through a number of the locations chosen for blockbuster films which had made use of New Zealand’s stunning scenery as a backdrop. As the site developed, additional features were added to help independent travelers devise their own customized itineraries. To make it easier to plan motoring holidays, the site cataloged the most popular driving routes in the country, highlighting different routes according to the season and indicating distances and times.

Later, a Travel Planner feature was added, which allowed visitors to click and ‘bookmark’ places or attractions they were interested in, and then view the results on a map. The Travel Planner offered suggested routes and public transport options between the chosen locations. There were also links to accommodation in the area. By registering with the website, users could save their Travel Plan and return to it later, or print it out to take on the visit. The website also had a ‘Your Words’ section where anyone could submit a blog about their New Zealand travels for possible inclusion on the website.

The Tourism New Zealand website won two Webby awards for online achievement and innovation. More importantly, perhaps, the growth of tourism in New Zealand was impressive. Overall tourism expenditure increased by an average of 6.9% per year between 1999 and 2004. From Britain, visits to New Zealand grew at an average annual rate of 13% between 2002 and 2006, compared to a rate of 4% overall for British visits abroad.

The website was set up to allow both individuals and travel organizations to create itineraries and travel packages to suit their own needs and interests. On the website, visitors can search for activities not solely by geographical location, but also by the particular nature of the activity. This is important as research shows that activities are the key driver of visitor satisfaction, contributing 74% to visitor satisfaction, while transport and accommodation account for the remaining 26%. The more activities that visitors undertake, the more satisfied they will be. It has also been found that visitors enjoy cultural activities most when they are interactive, such as visiting a marae (meeting ground) to learn about traditional Maori life. Many long-haul travelers enjoy such learning experiences, which provide them with stories to take home to their friends and family. In addition, it appears that visitors to New Zealand don’t want to be ‘one of the crowd’ and find activities that involve only a few people more special and meaningful.

It could be argued that New Zealand is not a typical destination. New Zealand is a small country with a visitor economy composed mainly of small businesses. It is generally perceived as a safe English-speaking country with a reliable transport infrastructure. Because of the long-haul flight, most visitors stay for longer (average 20 days) and want to see as much of the country as possible on what is often seen as a once-in-a-lifetime visit. However, the underlying lessons apply anywhere – the effectiveness of a strong brand, a strategy based on unique experiences and a comprehensive and user-friendly website.

Unlock your full potential in the IELTS Reading section – Visit our IELTS Reading Practice Question Answer page now!

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Renewable Energy IELTS Reading Question with Answer

Questions 1-7

  • Complete the table below.
  • Choose ONE WORD ONLY from the passage for each answer.
  • Write your answers in boxes 1-7 on your answer sheet.

Questions 8-13

  • Do the following statements agree with the information given in Reading Passage 1?
  • In boxes 8-13 on your answer sheet, write
  • TRUE             if the statement agrees with the information
  • FALSE            if the statement contradicts the information
  • NOT GIVEN  if there is no information on this

8 . The website www.newzealand.com aimed to provide ready-made itineraries and packages for travel companies and individual tourists.

9. It was found that most visitors started searching on the website by geographical location.

10.   According to research, 26% of visitor satisfaction is related to their accommodation.

11.  Visitors to New Zealand like to become involved in the local culture.

12. Visitors like staying in small hotels in New Zealand rather than in larger ones.

13. Many visitors feel it is unlikely that they will return to New Zealand after their visit.

Enhance your skills in identifying information as True, False, or Not Given . Click here to discover expert strategies and techniques for mastering this question type in the IELTS Reading section.

Answers for case study tourism New Zealand

1. Answer: Update

2. Answer: Environment 

3. Answer:Captain

4. Answer: Flims

5. Answer: Seasons 

6. Answer: Accommodation 

7. Answer: Blog

8. Answer: False

9. Answer: Not given

10. Answer: False

11. Answer: True

12. Answer: Not given

13. Answer: True 

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Solution for: Tourism

Answer table.

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Exam Review

Highlight

Questions 1-5

Reading Passage has 6 paragraphs (A-F).

Choose the most suitable heading for each paragraph from the list of headings below.

Write the appropriate numbers ( i-ix ) in boxes 1-5  on your answer sheet Paragraph D has been done for you as an example.

NB There are more headings than paragraphs so you will not use all of them.

You may use any heading more than once .

Questions 6-10

Do the following statements agree with the views of the writer in Reading Passage? In boxes 6-10  write

YES     if the statement agrees with the writer

NO     if the statement contradicts the writer

NOT GIVEN    if it is impossible to say what the writer thinks about this

Example    

People who can’t afford to travel watch films and TV.     Answer: NOT GIVEN

6 YES NO NOT GIVEN    Tourism is a trivial subject. 6. Answer: NO      Locate

7 YES NO NOT GIVEN    An analysis of deviance can act as a model for the analysis of tourism. 7. Answer: YES      Locate

8 YES NO NOT GIVEN    Tourists usually choose to travel overseas. 8. Answer: NOT GIVEN

9 YES NO NOT GIVEN    Tourists focus more on places they visit than those at home. 9. Answer: YES      Locate

10 YES NO NOT GIVEN    Tour operators try to cheat tourists. 10. Answer: NOT GIVEN

Questions 11-14

Chose one phrase (A-H) from the list of phrases to complete each key point below. Write the appropriate letters ( A-H ) in boxes 11-14 on your answer sheet.

The information in the completed sentences should be an accurate summary of points made by the writer.

NB There are more phrases A-H than sentences so you will not use them all. You may use any phrase more than once .

11     Our concept of tourism arises from  A B C D E F G H 11. Answer: D      Locate

12     The media can be used to enhance  A B C D E F G H 12. Answer: B      Locate

13     People view tourist landscapes in a different way from A B C D E F G H 13. Answer: F      Locate

14     Group tours encourage participants to look at  A B C D E F G H 14. Answer: H      Locate

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case study tourism new zealand reading answer

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Ielts Reading-Case Study: Tourism New Zealand website | IELTS reading Case Study: Tourism New Zealand website with answers

by Navita Thakur | Apr 8, 2020

Ielts Reading-Case Study: Tourism New Zealand website

You should spend about 20 minutes on Questions 1-13 which are based on Reading Passage 1 below.

READING PASSAGE 1 – Case Study: Tourism New Zealand website

Ielts Reading-Case Study Tourism New Zealand website

New Zealand is a small country of four million inhabita nts, a long-haul flight from all the major tourist-generating markets of the world. Tourism currently makes up 9% of the country’s gross domestic product, and is the country’s largest export sector. Unlike other export sectors, which make products and then sell them overseas, tourism brings its customers to New Zealand. The product is the country itself – the people, the places and the experiences. In 1999 , Tourism New Zealand launched a campaign to communicate a new brand position to the world. The campaign focused on New Zealand’s scenic beauty, exhilarating outdoor activities and authentic Maori culture, and it made New Zealand one of the strongest national brands in the world.

A key feature of the campaign was the website www.newzealand.com, which provided potential visitors to New Zealand with a single gateway to everything the destination had to offer. The heart of the website was a database of tourism services operators, both those based in New Zealand and those based abroad which offered tourism service to the country. Any tourism-related business could be listed by filling in a simple form. This meant that even the smallest bed and breakfast address or specialist activity provider could gain a web presence with access to an audience of long-haul visitors. In addition, because participating businesses were able to update the details they gave on a regular basis, the information provided remained accurate. And to maintain and improve standards, Tourism New Zealand organised a scheme whereby organisations appearing on the website underwent an independent evaluation against a set of agreed national standards of quality. As part of this, the effect of each business on the environment was considered.

To communicate the New Zealand experience, the site also carried features relating to famous people and places. One of the most popular was an interview with former New Zealand All Blacks rugby captain Tana Umaga. Another feature that attracted a lot of attention was an interactive journey through a number of the locations chosen for blockbuster films which had made use of New Zealand’s stunning scenery as a backdrop. As the site developed, additional features were added to help independent travelers devise their own customised itineraries. To make it easier to plan motoring holidays, the site catalogued the most popular driving routes in the country, highlighting different routes according to the season and indicating distances and times.

Later, a Travel Planner feature was added, which allowed visitors to click and ‘bookmark’ places or attractions they were interested in, and then view the results on a map. The Travel Planner offered suggested routes and public transport options between the chosen locations. There were also links to accommodation in the area. By registering with the website, users could save their Travel Plan and return to it later, or print it out to take on the visit. The website also had a ‘Your Words’ section where anyone could submit a blog of their New Zealand travels for possible inclusion on the website.

The Tourism New Zealand website won two Webby awards for online achievement and innovation. More importantly perhaps, the growth of tourism to New Zealand was impressive. Overall tourism expenditure increased by an average of 6.9% per year between 1999 and 2004. From Britain, visits to New Zealand grew at an average annual rate of 13% between 2002 and 2006, compared to a rate of 4% overall for British visits abroad.

The website was set up to allow both individuals and travel organisations to create itineraries and travel packages to suit their own needs and interests. On the website, visitors can search for activities not solely by geographical location, but also by the particular nature of the activity. This is important as research shows that activities are the key driver of visitor satisfaction, contributing 74% to visitor satisfaction, while transport and accommodation account for the remaining 26%. The more activities that visitors undertake, the more satisfied they will be. It has also been found that visitors enjoy cultural activities most when they are interactive, such as visiting a  marae  (meeting ground) to learn about traditional Maori life. Many long-haul travelers enjoy such learning experiences, which provide them with stories to take home to their friends and family. In addition, it appears that visitors to New Zealand don’t want to be ‘one of the crowd’ and find activities that involve only a few people more special and meaningful.

It could be argued that New Zealand is not a typical destination. New Zealand is a small country with a visitor economy composed mainly of small businesses. It is generally perceived as a safe English-speaking country with a reliable transport infrastructure. Because of the long-haul flight, most visitors stay for longer (average 20 days) and want to see as much of the country as possible on what is often seen as a once-in-a-lifetime visit. However, the underlying lessons apply anywhere – the effectiveness of a strong brand, a strategy based on unique experiences and a comprehensive and user-friendly website.

You should spend about 20 minutes on Questions 14-26 which are based on Reading Passage 2 below.

READING PASSAGE 2 – Why being bored is stimulating – and useful, too

Ielts Reading-Why being bored is stimulating – and useful, too

This most common of emotions is turning out to be more interesting than we thought

We all know how it feels – it’s impossible to keep your mind on anything, time stretches out, and all the things you could do seem equally unlikely to make you feel better. But defining boredom so that it can be studied in the lab has proved difficult. For a start, it can include a lot of other mental states, such as frustration, apathy, depression and indifference. There isn’t even agreement over whether boredom is always a low-energy, flat kind of emotion or whether feeling agitated and restless counts as boredom, too. In his book,  Boredom: A Lively History , Peter Toohey at the University of Calgary, Canada, compares it to disgust – an emotion that motivates us to stay away from certain situations. ‘If disgust protects humans from infection, boredom may protect them from “infectious” social situations,’ he suggests.

By asking people about their experiences of boredom, Thomas Goetz and his team at the University of Konstanz in Germany have recently identified five distinct types: indifferent, calibrating, searching, reactant and apathetic. These can be plotted on two axes – one running left to right, which measures low to high arousal, and the other from top to bottom, which measures how positive or negative the feeling is. Intriguingly, Goetz has found that while people experience all kinds of boredom, they tend to specialise in one. Of the five types, the most damaging is ‘reactant’ boredom with its explosive combination of high arousal and negative emotion. The most useful is what Goetz calls ‘indifferent’ boredom: someone isn’t engaged in anything satisfying but still feels relaxed and calm. However, it remains to be seen whether there are any character traits that predict the kind of boredom each of us might be prone to.

Psychologist Sandi Mann at the University of Central Lancashire, UK, goes further. ‘All emotions are there for a reason, including boredom,’ she says. Mann has found that being bored makes us more creative. ‘We’re all afraid of being bored but in actual fact it can lead to all kinds of amazing things,’ she says. In experiments published last year, Mann found that people who had been made to feel bored by copying numbers out of the phone book for 15 minutes came up with more creative ideas about how to use a polystyrene cup than a control group. Mann concluded that a passive, boring activity is best for creativity because it allows the mind to wander. In fact, she goes so far as to suggest that we should seek out more boredom in our lives.

Psychologist John Eastwood at York University in Toronto, Canada, isn’t convinced. ‘If you are in a state of mind-wandering you are not bored,’ he says. ‘In my view, by definition boredom is an undesirable state.’ That doesn’t necessarily mean that it isn’t adaptive, he adds. ‘Pain is adaptive – if we didn’t have physical pain, bad things would happen to us. Does that mean that we should actively cause pain? No. But even if boredom has evolved to help us survive, it can still be toxic if allowed to fester.’ For Eastwood, the central feature of boredom is a failure to put our ‘attention system’ into gear. This causes an inability to focus on anything, which makes time seem to go painfully slowly. What’s more, your efforts to improve the situation can end up making you feel worse. ‘People try to connect with the world and if they are not successful there’s that frustration and irritability,’ he says. Perhaps most worryingly, says Eastwood, repeatedly failing to engage attention can lead to state where we don’t know what to do any more, and no longer care.

Eastwood’s team is now trying to explore why the attention system fails. It’s early days but they think that at least some of it comes down to personality. Boredom proneness has been linked with a variety of traits. People who are motivated by pleasure seem to suffer particularly badly. Other personality traits, such as curiosity, are associated with a high boredom threshold. More evidence that boredom has detrimental effects comes from studies of people who are more or less prone to boredom. It seems those who bore easily face poorer prospects in education, their career and even life in general. But of course, boredom itself cannot kill – it’s the things we do to deal with it that may put us in danger. What can we do to alleviate it before it comes to that? Goetz’s group has one suggestion. Working with teenagers, they found that those who ‘approach’ a boring situation – in other words, see that it’s boring and get stuck in anyway – report less boredom than those who try to avoid it by using snacks, TV or social media for distraction.

Psychologist Francoise Wemelsfelder speculates that our over-connected lifestyles might even be a new source of boredom. ‘In modern human society there is a lot of overstimulation but still a lot of problems finding meaning,’ she says. So instead of seeking yet more mental stimulation, perhaps we should leave our phones alone, and use boredom to motivate us to engage with the world in a more meaningful way.

You should spend about 20 minutes on Questions 27-40 which are based on Reading Passage 3 below.

READING PASSAGE 3 – Artificial artist?

Ielts Reading-Artificial artist

Can computers really create works of art?

The Painting Fool is one of a growing number of computer programs which, so their makers claim, possess creative talents. Classical music by an artificial composer has had audiences enraptured, and even tricked them into believing a human was behind the score. Artworks painted by a robot have sold for thousands of dollars and been hung in prestigious galleries. And software has been built which creates are that could not have been imagined by the programmer.

Human beings are the only species to perform sophisticated creative acts regularly. If we can break this process down into computer code, where does that leave human creativity? ‘This is a question at the very core of humanity,’ says Geraint Wiggins, a computational creativity researcher at Goldsmiths, University of London. ‘It scares a lot of people. They are worried that it is taking something special away from what it means to be human.’

To some extent, we are all familiar with computerised art. The question is: where does the work of the artist stop and the creativity of the computer begin? Consider one of the oldest machine artists, Aaron, a robot that has had paintings exhibited in London’s Tate Modern and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Aaron can pick up a paintbrush and paint on canvas on its own. Impressive perhaps, but it is still little more than a tool to realise the programmer’s own creative ideas.

Simon Colton, the designer of the Painting Fool, is keen to make sure his creation doesn’t attract the same criticism. Unlike earlier ‘artists’ such as Aaron, the Painting Fool only needs minimal direction and can come up with its own concepts by going online for material. The software runs its own web searches and trawls through social media sites. It is now beginning to display a kind of imagination too, creating pictures from scratch. One of its original works is a series of fuzzy landscapes, depicting trees and sky. While some might say they have a mechanical look, Colton argues that such reactions arise from people’s double standards towards software-produced and human-produced art. After all, he says, consider that the Painting Fool painted the landscapes without referring to a photo. ‘If a child painted a new scene from its head, you’d say it has a certain level of imagination,’ he points out. ‘The same should be true of a machine.’ Software bugs can also lead to unexpected results. Some of the Painting Fool’s paintings of a chair came out in black and white, thanks to a technical glitch. This gives the work an eerie, ghostlike quality. Human artists like the renowned Ellsworth Kelly are lauded for limiting their colour palette – so why should computers be any different?

Researchers like Colton don’t believe it is right to measure machine creativity directly to that of humans who ‘have had millennia to develop our skills’. Others, though, are fascinated by the prospect that a computer might create something as original and subtle as our best artists. So far, only one has come close. Composer David Cope invented a program called Experiments in Musical Intelligence, or EMI. Not only did EMI create compositions in Cope’s style, but also that of the most revered classical composers, including Bach, Chopin and Mozart. Audiences were moved to tears, and EMI even fooled classical music experts into thinking they were hearing genuine Bach. Not everyone was impressed however. Some, such as Wiggins, have blasted Cope’s work as pseudoscience, and condemned him for his deliberately vague explanation of how the software worked. Meanwhile, Douglas Hofstadter of Indiana University said EMI created replicas which still rely completely on the original artist’s creative impulses. When audiences found out the truth they were often outraged with Cope, and one music lover even tried to punch him. Amid such controversy, Cope destroyed EMI’s vital databases.

But why did so many people love the music, yet recoil when the discovered how it was composed? A study by computer scientist David Moffat of Glasgow Caledonian University provides a clue. He asked both expert musicians and non-experts to assess six compositions. The participants weren’t told beforehand whether the tunes were composed by humans or computers, but were asked to guess, and then rate how much they liked each one. People who thought the composer was a computer tended to dislike the piece more than those who believed it was human. This was true even among the experts, who might have been expected to be more objective in their analyses.

Where does this prejudice come from? Paul Bloom of Yale University has a suggestion: he reckons part of the pleasure we get from art stems from the creative process behind the work. This can give it an ‘irresistible essence’, says Bloom. Meanwhile, experiments by Justin Kruger of New York University have shown that people’s enjoyment of an artwork increases if they think more time and effort was needed to create it. Similarly, Colton thinks that when people experience art, they wonder what the artist might have been thinking or what the artist is trying to tell them. It seems obvious, therefore, that with computers producing art, this speculation is cut short – there’s nothing to explore. But as technology becomes increasingly complex, finding those greater depths in computer art could become possible. This is precisely why Colton asks the Painting Fool to tap into online social networks for its inspiration: hopefully this way it will choose themes that will already be meaningful to us.

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Cambridge IELTS 13 Academic Reading Test 1 Answer Key

Cambridge 13 reading test 1 answers, reading passage - 1, case study: tourism new zealand website.

Case Study: Tourism New Zealand website reading answers

  • environment
  • accommodation

Reading Passage - 2

Why being bored is stimulating - and useful, too.

Why being bored is stimulating - and useful, too reading answers

Reading Passage - 3

Artificial artists.

Artificial artists reading answers

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Cambridge IELTS 13 Academic Reading Test 1 with Answers

Cambridge ielts 13 academic reading test 1, reading passage 1, case study: tourism new zealand website.

New Zealand is a small country of four million inhabitants, a long-haul flight from all the major tourist-generating markets of the world. Tourism currently makes up 9% of the country’s gross domestic product, and is the country’s largest export sector. Unlike other export sectors, which make products and then sell them overseas, tourism brings its customers to New Zealand. The product is the country itself – the people, the places and the experiences. In 1999, Tourism New Zealand launched a campaign to communicate a new brand position to the world. The campaign focused on New Zealand’s scenic beauty, exhilarating outdoor activities and authentic Maori culture, and it made New Zealand one of the strongest national brands in the world.

A key feature of the campaign was the website www.newzealand.com, which provided potential visitors to New Zealand with a single gateway to everything the destination had to offer. The heart of the website was a database of tourism services operators, both those based in New Zealand and those based abroad which offered tourism service to the country. Any tourism-related business could be listed by filling in a simple form. This meant that even the smallest bed and breakfast address or specialist activity provider could gain a web presence with access to an audience of long-haul visitors. In addition, because participating businesses were able to update the details they gave on a regular basis, the information provided remained accurate. And to maintain and improve standards, Tourism New Zealand organised a scheme whereby organisations appearing on the website underwent an independent evaluation against a set of agreed national standards of quality. As part of this, the effect of each business on the environment was considered.

To communicate the New Zealand experience, the site also carried features relating to famous people and places. One of the most popular was an interview with former New Zealand All Blacks rugby captain Tana Umaga. Another feature that attracted a lot of attention was an interactive journey through a number of the locations chosen for blockbuster films which had made use of New Zealand’s stunning scenery as a backdrop. As the site developed, additional features were added to help independent travelers devise their own customised itineraries. To make it easier to plan motoring holidays, the site catalogued the most popular driving routes in the country, highlighting different routes according to the season and indicating distances and times.

Later, a Travel Planner feature was added, which allowed visitors to click and ‘bookmark’ places or attractions they were interested in, and then view the results on a map. The Travel Planner offered suggested routes and public transport options between the chosen locations. There were also links to accommodation in the area. By registering with the website, users could save their Travel Plan and return to it later, or print it out to take on the visit. The website also had a ‘Your Words’ section where anyone could submit a blog of their New Zealand travels for possible inclusion on the website.

The Tourism New Zealand website won two Webby awards for online achievement and innovation. More importantly perhaps, the growth of tourism to New Zealand was impressive. Overall tourism expenditure increased by an average of 6.9% per year between 1999 and 2004. From Britain, visits to New Zealand grew at an average annual rate of 13% between 2002 and 2006, compared to a rate of 4% overall for British visits abroad.

The website was set up to allow both individuals and travel organisations to create itineraries and travel packages to suit their own needs and interests. On the website, visitors can search for activities not solely by geographical location, but also by the particular nature of the activity. This is important as research shows that activities are the key driver of visitor satisfaction, contributing 74% to visitor satisfaction, while transport and accommodation account for the remaining 26%. The more activities that visitors undertake, the more satisfied they will be. It has also been found that visitors enjoy cultural activities most when they are interactive, such as visiting a  marae  (meeting ground) to learn about traditional Maori life. Many long-haul travelers enjoy such learning experiences, which provide them with stories to take home to their friends and family. In addition, it appears that visitors to New Zealand don’t want to be ‘one of the crowd’ and find activities that involve only a few people more special and meaningful.

It could be argued that New Zealand is not a typical destination. New Zealand is a small country with a visitor economy composed mainly of small businesses. It is generally perceived as a safe English-speaking country with a reliable transport infrastructure. Because of the long-haul flight, most visitors stay for longer (average 20 days) and want to see as much of the country as possible on what is often seen as a once-in-a-lifetime visit. However, the underlying lessons apply anywhere – the effectiveness of a strong brand, a strategy based on unique experiences and a comprehensive and user-friendly website.

Questions 1-7

Complete the table below. Choose  ONE WORD ONLY  from the passage for each answer.

Write your answers in boxes  1-7  on your answer sheet.

Questions 8-13

Do the following statements agree with the information given in Reading Passage 1?

In boxes  8-13  on your answer sheet, write

TRUE                if the statement agrees with the information FALSE               if the statement contradicts the information NOT GIVEN     if there is no information on this

8    The website www.newzealand.com aimed to provide ready-made itineraries and packages for travel companies and individual tourists. 9    It was found that most visitors started searching on the website by geographical location. 10    According to research, 26% of visitor satisfaction is related to their accommodation. 11    Visitors to New Zealand like to become involved in the local culture. 12    Visitors like staying in small hotels in New Zealand rather than in larger ones. 13    Many visitors feel it is unlikely that they will return to New Zealand after their visit.

READING PASSAGE 2

You should spend about 20 minutes on  Questions 14-26  which are based on Reading Passage 2 below.

Why being bored is stimulating – and useful, too

This most common of emotions is turning out to be more interesting than we thought

We all know how it feels – it’s impossible to keep your mind on anything, time stretches out, and all the things you could do seem equally unlikely to make you feel better. But defining boredom so that it can be studied in the lab has proved difficult. For a start, it can include a lot of other mental states, such as frustration, apathy, depression and indifference. There isn’t even agreement over whether boredom is always a low-energy, flat kind of emotion or whether feeling agitated and restless counts as boredom, too. In his book,  Boredom: A Lively History , Peter Toohey at the University of Calgary, Canada, compares it to disgust – an emotion that motivates us to stay away from certain situations. ‘If disgust protects humans from infection, boredom may protect them from “infectious” social situations,’ he suggests.

By asking people about their experiences of boredom, Thomas Goetz and his team at the University of Konstanz in Germany have recently identified five distinct types: indifferent, calibrating, searching, reactant and apathetic. These can be plotted on two axes – one running left to right, which measures low to high arousal, and the other from top to bottom, which measures how positive or negative the feeling is. Intriguingly, Goetz has found that while people experience all kinds of boredom, they tend to specialise in one. Of the five types, the most damaging is ‘reactant’ boredom with its explosive combination of high arousal and negative emotion. The most useful is what Goetz calls ‘indifferent’ boredom: someone isn’t engaged in anything satisfying but still feels relaxed and calm. However, it remains to be seen whether there are any character traits that predict the kind of boredom each of us might be prone to.

Psychologist Sandi Mann at the University of Central Lancashire, UK, goes further. ‘All emotions are there for a reason, including boredom,’ she says. Mann has found that being bored makes us more creative. ‘We’re all afraid of being bored but in actual fact it can lead to all kinds of amazing things,’ she says. In experiments published last year, Mann found that people who had been made to feel bored by copying numbers out of the phone book for 15 minutes came up with more creative ideas about how to use a polystyrene cup than a control group. Mann concluded that a passive, boring activity is best for creativity because it allows the mind to wander. In fact, she goes so far as to suggest that we should seek out more boredom in our lives.

Psychologist John Eastwood at York University in Toronto, Canada, isn’t convinced. ‘If you are in a state of mind-wandering you are not bored,’ he says. ‘In my view, by definition boredom is an undesirable state.’ That doesn’t necessarily mean that it isn’t adaptive, he adds. ‘Pain is adaptive – if we didn’t have physical pain, bad things would happen to us. Does that mean that we should actively cause pain? No. But even if boredom has evolved to help us survive, it can still be toxic if allowed to fester.’ For Eastwood, the central feature of boredom is a failure to put our ‘attention system’ into gear. This causes an inability to focus on anything, which makes time seem to go painfully slowly. What’s more, your efforts to improve the situation can end up making you feel worse. ‘People try to connect with the world and if they are not successful there’s that frustration and irritability,’ he says. Perhaps most worryingly, says Eastwood, repeatedly failing to engage attention can lead to state where we don’t know what to do any more, and no longer care.

Eastwood’s team is now trying to explore why the attention system fails. It’s early days but they think that at least some of it comes down to personality. Boredom proneness has been linked with a variety of traits. People who are motivated by pleasure seem to suffer particularly badly. Other personality traits, such as curiosity, are associated with a high boredom threshold. More evidence that boredom has detrimental effects comes from studies of people who are more or less prone to boredom. It seems those who bore easily face poorer prospects in education, their career and even life in general. But of course, boredom itself cannot kill – it’s the things we do to deal with it that may put us in danger. What can we do to alleviate it before it comes to that? Goetz’s group has one suggestion. Working with teenagers, they found that those who ‘approach’ a boring situation – in other words, see that it’s boring and get stuck in anyway – report less boredom than those who try to avoid it by using snacks, TV or social media for distraction.

Psychologist Francoise Wemelsfelder speculates that our over-connected lifestyles might even be a new source of boredom. ‘In modern human society there is a lot of overstimulation but still a lot of problems finding meaning,’ she says. So instead of seeking yet more mental stimulation, perhaps we should leave our phones alone, and use boredom to motivate us to engage with the world in a more meaningful way.

Questions 14-19

Reading Passage 2 has six paragraphs,  A-F Choose the correct heading for each paragraph from the list of headings below.

Write the correct number,  i-viii , in boxes  14-19  on your answer sheet.

List of Headings

i            The productive outcomes that may result from boredom

ii           What teachers can do to prevent boredom

iii          A new explanation and a new cure for boredom

iv          Problems with a scientific approach to boredom

v           A potential danger arising from boredom

vi          Creating a system of classification for feelings of boredom

vii         Age groups most affected by boredom

viii         Identifying those most affected by boredom

14    Paragraph  A 15    Paragraph  B 16    Paragraph  C 17    Paragraph  D 18    Paragraph  E 19    Paragraph  F

Questions 20-23

Look at the following people (Questions  20-23 ) and the list of ideas below.

Match each person with the correct idea,  A-E .

Write the correct letter,  A-E , in boxes  20-23  on your answer sheet.

20    Peter Toohey

21    Thomas Goetz

22    John Eastwood

23    Francoise Wemelsfelder

List of Ideas

A      The way we live today may encourage boredom.

B      One sort of boredom is worse than all the others.

C      Levels of boredom may fall in the future.

D      Trying to cope with boredom can increase its negative effects.

E      Boredom may encourage us to avoid an unpleasant experience.

Questions 24-26

Complete the summary below. Choose  ONE WORD ONLY  from the passage for each answer.

Write your answers in boxes  24-26  on your answer sheet.

Responses to boredom

For John Eastwood, the central feature of boredom is that people cannot  24 ……………………………, due to a failure in what he calls the ‘attention system’, and as a result they become frustrated and irritable. His team suggests that those for whom  25 ……………………….. is an important aim in life may have problems in coping with boredom, whereas those who have the characteristic of  26 ……………………….. can generally cope with it.

READING PASSAGE 3

You should spend about 20 minutes on  Questions 27-40  which are based on Reading Passage 3 below.

Artificial artist?

Can computers really create works of art?

The Painting Fool is one of a growing number of computer programs which, so their makers claim, possess creative talents. Classical music by an artificial composer has had audiences enraptured, and even tricked them into believing a human was behind the score. Artworks painted by a robot have sold for thousands of dollars and been hung in prestigious galleries. And software has been built which creates are that could not have been imagined by the programmer.

Human beings are the only species to perform sophisticated creative acts regularly. If we can break this process down into computer code, where does that leave human creativity? ‘This is a question at the very core of humanity,’ says Geraint Wiggins, a computational creativity researcher at Goldsmiths, University of London. ‘It scares a lot of people. They are worried that it is taking something special away from what it means to be human.’

To some extent, we are all familiar with computerised art. The question is: where does the work of the artist stop and the creativity of the computer begin? Consider one of the oldest machine artists, Aaron, a robot that has had paintings exhibited in London’s Tate Modern and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Aaron can pick up a paintbrush and paint on canvas on its own. Impressive perhaps, but it is still little more than a tool to realise the programmer’s own creative ideas.

Simon Colton, the designer of the Painting Fool, is keen to make sure his creation doesn’t attract the same criticism. Unlike earlier ‘artists’ such as Aaron, the Painting Fool only needs minimal direction and can come up with its own concepts by going online for material. The software runs its own web searches and trawls through social media sites. It is now beginning to display a kind of imagination too, creating pictures from scratch. One of its original works is a series of fuzzy landscapes, depicting trees and sky. While some might say they have a mechanical look, Colton argues that such reactions arise from people’s double standards towards software-produced and human-produced art. After all, he says, consider that the Painting Fool painted the landscapes without referring to a photo. ‘If a child painted a new scene from its head, you’d say it has a certain level of imagination,’ he points out. ‘The same should be true of a machine.’ Software bugs can also lead to unexpected results. Some of the Painting Fool’s paintings of a chair came out in black and white, thanks to a technical glitch. This gives the work an eerie, ghostlike quality. Human artists like the renowned Ellsworth Kelly are lauded for limiting their colour palette – so why should computers be any different?

Researchers like Colton don’t believe it is right to measure machine creativity directly to that of humans who ‘have had millennia to develop our skills’. Others, though, are fascinated by the prospect that a computer might create something as original and subtle as our best artists. So far, only one has come close. Composer David Cope invented a program called Experiments in Musical Intelligence, or EMI. Not only did EMI create compositions in Cope’s style, but also that of the most revered classical composers, including Bach, Chopin and Mozart. Audiences were moved to tears, and EMI even fooled classical music experts into thinking they were hearing genuine Bach. Not everyone was impressed however. Some, such as Wiggins, have blasted Cope’s work as pseudoscience, and condemned him for his deliberately vague explanation of how the software worked. Meanwhile, Douglas Hofstadter of Indiana University said EMI created replicas which still rely completely on the original artist’s creative impulses. When audiences found out the truth they were often outraged with Cope, and one music lover even tried to punch him. Amid such controversy, Cope destroyed EMI’s vital databases.

But why did so many people love the music, yet recoil when the discovered how it was composed? A study by computer scientist David Moffat of Glasgow Caledonian University provides a clue. He asked both expert musicians and non-experts to assess six compositions. The participants weren’t told beforehand whether the tunes were composed by humans or computers, but were asked to guess, and then rate how much they liked each one. People who thought the composer was a computer tended to dislike the piece more than those who believed it was human. This was true even among the experts, who might have been expected to be more objective in their analyses.

Where does this prejudice come from? Paul Bloom of Yale University has a suggestion: he reckons part of the pleasure we get from art stems from the creative process behind the work. This can give it an ‘irresistible essence’, says Bloom. Meanwhile, experiments by Justin Kruger of New York University have shown that people’s enjoyment of an artwork increases if they think more time and effort was needed to create it. Similarly, Colton thinks that when people experience art, they wonder what the artist might have been thinking or what the artist is trying to tell them. It seems obvious, therefore, that with computers producing art, this speculation is cut short – there’s nothing to explore. But as technology becomes increasingly complex, finding those greater depths in computer art could become possible. This is precisely why Colton asks the Painting Fool to tap into online social networks for its inspiration: hopefully this way it will choose themes that will already be meaningful to us.

Questions 27-31

Choose the correct letter,  A ,  B ,  C  or  D .

Write the correct letter in boxes  27-31  on your answer sheet.

27    What is the writer suggesting about computer-produced works in the first paragraph?

A    People’s acceptance of them can vary considerably. B    A great deal of progress has already been attained in this field. C    They have had more success in some artistic genres than in others. D    the advances are not as significant as the public believes them to be.

28    According to Geraint Wiggins, why are many people worried by computer art?

A    It is aesthetically inferior to human art. B    It may ultimately supersede human art. C    It undermines a fundamental human quality. D    It will lead to a deterioration in human ability.

29    What is a key difference between Aaron and the Painting Fool?

A    its programmer’s background B    public response to its work C    the source of its subject matter D    the technical standard of its output

30    What point does Simon Colton make in the fourth paragraph?

A    Software-produced art is often dismissed as childish and simplistic. B    The same concepts of creativity should not be applied to all forms of art. C    It is unreasonable to expect a machine to be as imaginative as a human being. D    People tend to judge computer art and human art according to different criteria.

31    The writer refers to the paintings of a chair as an example of computer art which

A    achieves a particularly striking effect. B    exhibits a certain level of genuine artistic skill. C    closely resembles that of a well-known artist. D    highlights the technical limitations of the software.

Questions 32-37

Complete each sentence with the correct ending,  A-G  below.

Write the correct letter,  A-G , in boxes  32-37  on your answer sheet.

32    Simon Colton says it is important to consider the long-term view then

33    David Cope’s EMI software surprised people by

34    Geraint Wiggins criticized Cope for not

35    Douglas Hofstadter claimed that EMI was

36    Audiences who had listened to EMI’s music became angry after

37    The participants in David Moffat’s study had to assess music without

A      generating work that was virtually indistinguishable from that of humans.

B      knowing whether it was the work of humans or software.

C      producing work entirely dependent on the imagination of its creator.

D      comparing the artistic achievements of humans and computers.

E      revealing the technical details of his program.

F      persuading the public to appreciate computer art.

G     discovering that it was the product of a computer program

Questions 38-40

Do the following statements agree with the claims of the writer in Reading Passage 3?

In boxes  38-40  on your answer sheet, write

YES                   if the statement agrees with the claims of the writer NO                    if the statement contradicts the claims of the writer NOT GIVEN     if it is impossible to say what the writer thinks about this

38    Moffat’s research may help explain people’s reactions to EMI.

39    The non-experts in Moffat’s study all responded in a predictable way.

40   Justin Kruger’s findings cast doubt on Paul Bloom’s theory about people’s prejudice towards computer art.

Cambridge IELTS 13 Academic Reading Test 1 Answers

1. update 2. environment 3. captain 4. films 5. season 6. accommodation 7. blog 8. FALSE 9. NOT GIVEN 10. FALSE 11. TRUE 12. NOT GIVEN 13. TRUE 14. iv 15. vi 16. i 17. v 18. viii 19. iii 20. E

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CAMBRIDGE IELTS 13 – TEST 1 PASSAGE 1 – CASE STUDY: TOURISM NEW ZEALAND WEBSITE

case study tourism new zealand reading answer

New Zealand is a small country of four million inhabitants, a long-haul flight from all the major tourist-generating markets of the world. Tourism currently makes up 9% of the country’s gross domestic product, and is the country’s largest export sector. Unlike other export sectors, which make products and then sell them overseas, tourism brings its customers to New Zealand. The product is the country itself – the people, the places and the experiences. In 1999, Tourism New Zealand launched a campaign to communicate a new brand position to the world. The campaign focused on New Zealand’s scenic beauty, exhilarating outdoor activities and authentic Maori culture, and it made New Zealand one of the strongest national brands in the world.

A key feature of the campaign was the website www.newzealand.com, which provided potential visitors to New Zealand with a single gateway to everything the destination had to offer. The heart of the website was a database of tourism services operators, both those based in New Zealand and those based abroad which offered tourism service to the country. Any tourism-related business could be listed by filling in a simple form. This meant that even the smallest bed and breakfast address or specialist activity provider could gain a web presence with access to an audience of long-haul visitors. In addition, because participating businesses were able to update the details they gave on a regular basis, the information provided remained accurate. And to maintain and improve standards, Tourism New Zealand organised a scheme whereby organisations appearing on the website underwent an independent evaluation against a set of agreed national standards of quality. As part of this, the effect of each business on the environment was considered.

To communicate the New Zealand experience, the site also carried features relating to famous people and places. One of the most popular was an interview with former New Zealand All Blacks rugby captain Tana Umaga. Another feature that attracted a lot of attention was an interactive journey through a number of the locations chosen for blockbuster films which had made use of New Zealand’s stunning scenery as a backdrop. As the site developed, additional features were added to help independent travelers devise their own customised itineraries. To make it easier to plan motoring holidays, the site catalogued the most popular driving routes in the country, highlighting different routes according to the season and indicating distances and times.

Later, a Travel Planner feature was added, which allowed visitors to click and ‘bookmark’ places or attractions they were interested in, and then view the results on a map. The Travel Planner offered suggested routes and public transport options between the chosen locations. There were also links to accommodation in the area. By registering with the website, users could save their Travel Plan and return to it later, or print it out to take on the visit. The website also had a ‘Your Words’ section where anyone could submit a blog of their New Zealand travels for possible inclusion on the website.

The Tourism New Zealand website won two Webby awards for online achievement and innovation. More importantly perhaps, the growth of tourism to New Zealand was impressive. Overall tourism expenditure increased by an average of 6.9% per year between 1999 and 2004. From Britain, visits to New Zealand grew at an average annual rate of 13% between 2002 and 2006, compared to a rate of 4% overall for British visits abroad.

The website was set up to allow both individuals and travel organisations to create itineraries and travel packages to suit their own needs and interests. On the website, visitors can search for activities not solely by geographical location, but also by the particular nature of the activity. This is important as research shows that activities are the key driver of visitor satisfaction, contributing 74% to visitor satisfaction, while transport and accommodation account for the remaining 26%. The more activities that visitors undertake, the more satisfied they will be. It has also been found that visitors enjoy cultural activities most when they are interactive, such as visiting a  marae  (meeting ground) to learn about traditional Maori life. Many long-haul travelers enjoy such learning experiences, which provide them with stories to take home to their friends and family. In addition, it appears that visitors to New Zealand don’t want to be ‘one of the crowd’ and find activities that involve only a few people more special and meaningful.

It could be argued that New Zealand is not a typical destination. New Zealand is a small country with a visitor economy composed mainly of small businesses. It is generally perceived as a safe English-speaking country with a reliable transport infrastructure. Because of the long-haul flight, most visitors stay for longer (average 20 days) and want to see as much of the country as possible on what is often seen as a once-in-a-lifetime visit. However, the underlying lessons apply anywhere – the effectiveness of a strong brand, a strategy based on unique experiences and a comprehensive and user-friendly website.

Questions 1-7

Complete the table below. Choose  ONE WORD ONLY  from the passage for each answer.

Write your answers in boxes  1-7  on your answer sheet.

  Questions 8-13

Do the following statements agree with the information given in Reading Passage 1?

In boxes  8-13  on your answer sheet, write

TRUE                if the statement agrees with the information

FALSE               if the statement contradicts the information

NOT GIVEN     if there is no information on this

8    The website www.newzealand.com aimed to provide ready-made itineraries and packages for travel companies and individual tourists.

9    It was found that most visitors started searching on the website by geographical location.

10    According to research, 26% of visitor satisfaction is related to their accommodation.

11    Visitors to New Zealand like to become involved in the local culture.

12    Visitors like staying in small hotels in New Zealand rather than in larger ones.

13    Many visitors feel it is unlikely that they will return to New Zealand after their visit.

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CAMBRIDGE IELTS 13 – TEST 2 PASSAGE 3 – MAKING THE MOST OF TRENDS

case study tourism new zealand reading answer

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Case Study Tourism New Zealand website

case study tourism new zealand reading answer

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Cambridge 13 IELTS Academic Reading Test 1

READING PASSAGE 1

You should spend about 20 minutes on  Questions   1-13  which are based on Reading Passage 1 below.

Case Study: Tourism New Zealand website

New Zealand is a small country of four million inhabitants, a long-haul flight from all the major tourist-generating markets of the world. Tourism currently makes up 9% of the country’s gross domestic product, and is the country’s largest export sector. Unlike other export sectors, which make products and then sell them overseas, tourism brings its customers to New Zealand. The product is the country itself – the people, the places and the experiences. In 1999, Tourism New Zealand launched a campaign to communicate a new brand position to the world. The campaign focused on New Zealand’s scenic beauty, exhilarating outdoor activities and authentic Maori culture, and it made New Zealand one of the strongest national brands in the world.

A key feature of the campaign was the website www.newzealand.com, which provided potential visitors to New Zealand with a single gateway to everything the destination had to offer. The heart of the website was a database of tourism services operators, both those based in New Zealand and those based abroad which offered tourism service to the country. Any tourism-related business could be listed by filling in a simple form. This meant that even the smallest bed and breakfast address or specialist activity provider could gain a web presence with access to an audience of long-haul visitors. In addition, because participating businesses were able to update the details they gave on a regular basis, the information provided remained accurate. And to maintain and improve standards, Tourism New Zealand organised a scheme whereby organisations appearing on the website underwent an independent evaluation against a set of agreed national standards of quality. As part of this, the effect of each business on the environment was considered.

To communicate the New Zealand experience, the site also carried features relating to famous people and places. One of the most popular was an interview with former New Zealand All Blacks rugby captain Tana Umaga. Another feature that attracted a lot of attention was an interactive journey through a number of the locations chosen for blockbuster films which had made use of New Zealand’s stunning scenery as a backdrop. As the site developed, additional features were added to help independent travelers devise their own customised itineraries. To make it easier to plan motoring holidays, the site catalogued the most popular driving routes in the country, highlighting different routes according to the season and indicating distances and times.

Later, a Travel Planner feature was added, which allowed visitors to click and ‘bookmark’ places or attractions they were interested in, and then view the results on a map. The Travel Planner offered suggested routes and public transport options between the chosen locations. There were also links to accommodation in the area. By registering with the website, users could save their Travel Plan and return to it later, or print it out to take on the visit. The website also had a ‘Your Words’ section where anyone could submit a blog of their New Zealand travels for possible inclusion on the website.

The Tourism New Zealand website won two Webby awards for online achievement and innovation. More importantly perhaps, the growth of tourism to New Zealand was impressive. Overall tourism expenditure increased by an average of 6.9% per year between 1999 and 2004. From Britain, visits to New Zealand grew at an average annual rate of 13% between 2002 and 2006, compared to a rate of 4% overall for British visits abroad.

The website was set up to allow both individuals and travel organisations to create itineraries and travel packages to suit their own needs and interests. On the website, visitors can search for activities not solely by geographical location, but also by the particular nature of the activity. This is important as research shows that activities are the key driver of visitor satisfaction, contributing 74% to visitor satisfaction, while transport and accommodation account for the remaining 26%. The more activities that visitors undertake, the more satisfied they will be. It has also been found that visitors enjoy cultural activities most when they are interactive, such as visiting a  marae  (meeting ground) to learn about traditional Maori life. Many long-haul travelers enjoy such learning experiences, which provide them with stories to take home to their friends and family. In addition, it appears that visitors to New Zealand don’t want to be ‘one of the crowd’ and find activities that involve only a few people more special and meaningful.

It could be argued that New Zealand is not a typical destination. New Zealand is a small country with a visitor economy composed mainly of small businesses. It is generally perceived as a safe English-speaking country with a reliable transport infrastructure. Because of the long-haul flight, most visitors stay for longer (average 20 days) and want to see as much of the country as possible on what is often seen as a once-in-a-lifetime visit. However, the underlying lessons apply anywhere – the effectiveness of a strong brand, a strategy based on unique experiences and a comprehensive and user-friendly website.

READING PASSAGE 2

You should spend about 20 minutes on  Questions 14-26  which are based on Reading Passage 2 below. 

Why being bored is stimulating – and useful, too

This most common of emotions is turning out to be more interesting than we thought

We all know how it feels – it’s impossible to keep your mind on anything, time stretches out, and all the things you could do seem equally unlikely to make you feel better. But defining boredom so that it can be studied in the lab has proved difficult. For a start, it can include a lot of other mental states, such as frustration, apathy, depression and indifference. There isn’t even agreement over whether boredom is always a low-energy, flat kind of emotion or whether feeling agitated and restless counts as boredom, too. In his book,  Boredom: A Lively History , Peter Toohey at the University of Calgary, Canada, compares it to disgust – an emotion that motivates us to stay away from certain situations. ‘If disgust protects humans from infection, boredom may protect them from “infectious” social situations,’ he suggests.

By asking people about their experiences of boredom, Thomas Goetz and his team at the University of Konstanz in Germany have recently identified five distinct types: indifferent, calibrating, searching, reactant and apathetic. These can be plotted on two axes – one running left to right, which measures low to high arousal, and the other from top to bottom, which measures how positive or negative the feeling is. Intriguingly, Goetz has found that while people experience all kinds of boredom, they tend to specialise in one. Of the five types, the most damaging is ‘reactant’ boredom with its explosive combination of high arousal and negative emotion. The most useful is what Goetz calls ‘indifferent’ boredom: someone isn’t engaged in anything satisfying but still feels relaxed and calm. However, it remains to be seen whether there are any character traits that predict the kind of boredom each of us might be prone to.

Psychologist Sandi Mann at the University of Central Lancashire, UK, goes further. ‘All emotions are there for a reason, including boredom,’ she says. Mann has found that being bored makes us more creative. ‘We’re all afraid of being bored but in actual fact it can lead to all kinds of amazing things,’ she says. In experiments published last year, Mann found that people who had been made to feel bored by copying numbers out of the phone book for 15 minutes came up with more creative ideas about how to use a polystyrene cup than a control group. Mann concluded that a passive, boring activity is best for creativity because it allows the mind to wander. In fact, she goes so far as to suggest that we should seek out more boredom in our lives.

Psychologist John Eastwood at York University in Toronto, Canada, isn’t convinced. ‘If you are in a state of mind-wandering you are not bored,’ he says. ‘In my view, by definition boredom is an undesirable state.’ That doesn’t necessarily mean that it isn’t adaptive, he adds. ‘Pain is adaptive – if we didn’t have physical pain, bad things would happen to us. Does that mean that we should actively cause pain? No. But even if boredom has evolved to help us survive, it can still be toxic if allowed to fester.’ For Eastwood, the central feature of boredom is a failure to put our ‘attention system’ into gear. This causes an inability to focus on anything, which makes time seem to go painfully slowly. What’s more, your efforts to improve the situation can end up making you feel worse. ‘People try to connect with the world and if they are not successful there’s that frustration and irritability,’ he says. Perhaps most worryingly, says Eastwood, repeatedly failing to engage attention can lead to state where we don’t know what to do any more, and no longer care.

Eastwood’s team is now trying to explore why the attention system fails. It’s early days but they think that at least some of it comes down to personality. Boredom proneness has been linked with a variety of traits. People who are motivated by pleasure seem to suffer particularly badly. Other personality traits, such as curiosity, are associated with a high boredom threshold. More evidence that boredom has detrimental effects comes from studies of people who are more or less prone to boredom. It seems those who bore easily face poorer prospects in education, their career and even life in general. But of course, boredom itself cannot kill – it’s the things we do to deal with it that may put us in danger. What can we do to alleviate it before it comes to that? Goetz’s group has one suggestion. Working with teenagers, they found that those who ‘approach’ a boring situation – in other words, see that it’s boring and get stuck in anyway – report less boredom than those who try to avoid it by using snacks, TV or social media for distraction.

Psychologist Francoise Wemelsfelder speculates that our over-connected lifestyles might even be a new source of boredom. ‘In modern human society there is a lot of overstimulation but still a lot of problems finding meaning,’ she says. So instead of seeking yet more mental stimulation, perhaps we should leave our phones alone, and use boredom to motivate us to engage with the world in a more meaningful way.

READING PASSAGE 3

You should spend about 20 minutes on  Questions 27-40  which are based on Reading Passage 3 below.

Artificial artist?

Can computers really create works of art?

The Painting Fool is one of a growing number of computer programs which, so their makers claim, possess creative talents. Classical music by an artificial composer has had audiences enraptured, and even tricked them into believing a human was behind the score. Artworks painted by a robot have sold for thousands of dollars and been hung in prestigious galleries. And software has been built which creates are that could not have been imagined by the programmer.

Human beings are the only species to perform sophisticated creative acts regularly. If we can break this process down into computer code, where does that leave human creativity? ‘This is a question at the very core of humanity,’ says Geraint Wiggins, a computational creativity researcher at Goldsmiths, University of London. ‘It scares a lot of people. They are worried that it is taking something special away from what it means to be human.’

To some extent, we are all familiar with computerised art. The question is: where does the work of the artist stop and the creativity of the computer begin? Consider one of the oldest machine artists, Aaron, a robot that has had paintings exhibited in London’s Tate Modern and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Aaron can pick up a paintbrush and paint on canvas on its own. Impressive perhaps, but it is still little more than a tool to realise the programmer’s own creative ideas.

Simon Colton, the designer of the Painting Fool, is keen to make sure his creation doesn’t attract the same criticism. Unlike earlier ‘artists’ such as Aaron, the Painting Fool only needs minimal direction and can come up with its own concepts by going online for material. The software runs its own web searches and trawls through social media sites. It is now beginning to display a kind of imagination too, creating pictures from scratch. One of its original works is a series of fuzzy landscapes, depicting trees and sky. While some might say they have a mechanical look, Colton argues that such reactions arise from people’s double standards towards software-produced and human-produced art. After all, he says, consider that the Painting Fool painted the landscapes without referring to a photo. ‘If a child painted a new scene from its head, you’d say it has a certain level of imagination,’ he points out. ‘The same should be true of a machine.’ Software bugs can also lead to unexpected results. Some of the Painting Fool’s paintings of a chair came out in black and white, thanks to a technical glitch. This gives the work an eerie, ghostlike quality. Human artists like the renowned Ellsworth Kelly are lauded for limiting their colour palette – so why should computers be any different?

Researchers like Colton don’t believe it is right to measure machine creativity directly to that of humans who ‘have had millennia to develop our skills’. Others, though, are fascinated by the prospect that a computer might create something as original and subtle as our best artists. So far, only one has come close. Composer David Cope invented a program called Experiments in Musical Intelligence, or EMI. Not only did EMI create compositions in Cope’s style, but also that of the most revered classical composers, including Bach, Chopin and Mozart. Audiences were moved to tears, and EMI even fooled classical music experts into thinking they were hearing genuine Bach. Not everyone was impressed however. Some, such as Wiggins, have blasted Cope’s work as pseudoscience, and condemned him for his deliberately vague explanation of how the software worked. Meanwhile, Douglas Hofstadter of Indiana University said EMI created replicas which still rely completely on the original artist’s creative impulses. When audiences found out the truth they were often outraged with Cope, and one music lover even tried to punch him. Amid such controversy, Cope destroyed EMI’s vital databases.

But why did so many people love the music, yet recoil when the discovered how it was composed? A study by computer scientist David Moffat of Glasgow Caledonian University provides a clue. He asked both expert musicians and non-experts to assess six compositions. The participants weren’t told beforehand whether the tunes were composed by humans or computers, but were asked to guess, and then rate how much they liked each one. People who thought the composer was a computer tended to dislike the piece more than those who believed it was human. This was true even among the experts, who might have been expected to be more objective in their analyses.

Where does this prejudice come from? Paul Bloom of Yale University has a suggestion: he reckons part of the pleasure we get from art stems from the creative process behind the work. This can give it an ‘irresistible essence’, says Bloom. Meanwhile, experiments by Justin Kruger of New York University have shown that people’s enjoyment of an artwork increases if they think more time and effort was needed to create it. Similarly, Colton thinks that when people experience art, they wonder what the artist might have been thinking or what the artist is trying to tell them. It seems obvious, therefore, that with computers producing art, this speculation is cut short – there’s nothing to explore. But as technology becomes increasingly complex, finding those greater depths in computer art could become possible. This is precisely why Colton asks the Painting Fool to tap into online social networks for its inspiration: hopefully this way it will choose themes that will already be meaningful to us.

Complete the table below.

Choose  ONE WORD ONLY  from the passage for each answer.

Write your answers in boxes 1-7  on your answer sheet.

Do the following statements agree with the information given in Reading Passage 1?

In boxes 8-13  on your answer sheet, write

TRUE  if the statement agrees with the information

FALSE if the statement contradicts the information

NOT GIVEN if there is no information on this

8. The website www.newzealand.com aimed to provide ready-made itineraries and packages for travel companies and individual tourists.

9. It was found that most visitors started searching on the website by geographical location.

10. According to research, 26% of visitor satisfaction is related to their accommodation.

11. Visitors to New Zealand like to become involved in the local culture.

12. Visitors like staying in small hotels in New Zealand rather than in larger ones.

13. Many visitors feel it is unlikely that they will return to New Zealand after their visit.

Reading Passage 2 has six paragraphs,  A-F

Choose the correct heading for each paragraph from the list of headings below.

Write the correct number,  i-viii , in boxes 14-19  on your answer sheet.

List of Headings

i            The productive outcomes that may result from boredom

ii           What teachers can do to prevent boredom 

iii          A new explanation and a new cure for boredom

iv          Problems with a scientific approach to boredom

v           A potential danger arising from boredom

vi          Creating a system of classification for feelings of boredom

vii         Age groups most affected by boredom

viii         Identifying those most affected by boredom

14. Paragraph A

15. Paragraph B

16. Paragraph C

17. Paragraph D

18. Paragraph E

19. Paragraph F

Look at the following people (Questions  20-23 ) and the list of ideas below.

Match each person with the correct idea,  A-E .

List of Ideas

A      The way we live today may encourage boredom.

B      One sort of boredom is worse than all the others.

C      Levels of boredom may fall in the future.

D      Trying to cope with boredom can increase its negative effects.

E      Boredom may encourage us to avoid an unpleasant experience.

Write the correct letter, A-E , in boxes 20-23  on your answer sheet.

20. Peter Toohey

21. Thomas Goetz

22. John Eastwood

23. Francoise Wemelsfelder

Complete the summary below.

Write your answers in boxes 24-26  on your answer sheet.

Responses to boredom

For John Eastwood, the central feature of boredom is that people cannot  24. , due to a failure in what he calls the ‘attention system’, and as a result they become frustrated and irritable. His team suggests that those for whom  25.  is an important aim in life may have problems in coping with boredom, whereas those who have the characteristic of  26.  can generally cope with it.

Choose the correct letter,  A ,  B ,  C  or  D .

Write the correct letter in boxes 27-31  on your answer sheet.

27. What is the writer suggesting about computer-produced works in the first paragraph?

28. According to Geraint Wiggins, why are many people worried by computer art?

29. What is a key difference between Aaron and the Painting Fool?

30. What point does Simon Colton make in the fourth paragraph?

31. The writer refers to the paintings of a chair as an example of computer art which

Complete each sentence with the correct ending,  A-G  below.

Write the correct letter,  A-G , in boxes 32-37  on your answer sheet.

A      generating work that was virtually indistinguishable from that of humans.

B      knowing whether it was the work of humans or software.

C      producing work entirely dependent on the imagination of its creator.

D      comparing the artistic achievements of humans and computers.

E      revealing the technical details of his program.

F      persuading the public to appreciate computer art.

G     discovering that it was the product of a computer program

32. Simon Colton says it is important to consider the long-term view then

33. David Cope’s EMI software surprised people by

34. Geraint Wiggins criticized Cope for not

35. Douglas Hofstadter claimed that EMI was

36. Audiences who had listened to EMI’s music became angry after

37. The participants in David Moffat’s study had to assess music without

Do the following statements agree with the claims of the writer in Reading Passage 3?

In boxes 38-40  on your answer sheet, write

YES if the statement agrees with the claims of the writer

NO if the statement contradicts the claims of the writer

NOT GIVEN if it is impossible to say what the writer thinks about this

38. Moffat’s research may help explain people’s reactions to EMI.

39. The non-experts in Moffat’s study all responded in a predictable way.

40. Justin Kruger’s findings cast doubt on Paul Bloom’s theory about people’s prejudice towards computer art.

clock.png

Time’s up

2. environment

6. accommodation

9. NOT GIVEN

12. NOT GIVEN

25. pleasure

26. curiosity

39. NOT GIVEN

case study tourism new zealand reading answer

That is now corrected, Thank you!

The box for questions # 20 to 23 and 32 to 37 are missing.

case study tourism new zealand reading answer

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IMAGES

  1. Case Study Tourism New Zealand Website

    case study tourism new zealand reading answer

  2. IELTS 13 READING TEST 1 PASSAGE 1

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  3. Giải IELTS Reading Cam 13: Case Study

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  4. Reading Passage 1 Case Study: Tourism New Zealand Website

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  5. Case Study Tourism New Zealand Website Ielts Reading Answer Key

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  6. READING

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