LATCrosswordAnswers.com

  • LA Times Crossword
  • November 23 2022

Book review?

While searching our database we found 1 possible solution for the: Book review? crossword clue.  This crossword clue was last seen on November 23 2022 LA Times Crossword puzzle . The solution we have for Book review? has a total of 5 letters.

Recent Usage:

  • LA Times: Nov 23, 2022

Related Clues

We have found 8 other crossword clues with the same answer.

  • Sit in on, as a class
  • Embezzler's dread
  • Books review
  • Accountant's investigation
  • Regular review
  • Taxpayer's dread
  • IRS examination

Related Answers

We have found 0 other crossword answers for this clue.

Other November 23 2022 Puzzle Clues

There are a total of 75 clues in November 23 2022 crossword puzzle.

  • Fine print, say
  • With 45-Across, "I don't need two silly sticks that rotate on my timepiece!"
  • "For real!"

If you have already solved this crossword clue and are looking for the main post then head over to LA Times Crossword November 23 2022 Answers

New York Times Crossword Answers

Feature of The New York Review of Books NYT Crossword

books review crossword puzzle clue

Feature of The New York Review of Books Crossword Clue NYT . The NYTimes Crossword is a classic crossword puzzle. Both the main and the mini crosswords are published daily and published all the solutions of those puzzles for you. Two or more clue answers mean that the clue has appeared multiple times throughout the years.

FEATURE OF THE NEW YORK REVIEW OF BOOKS Ny Times Crossword Clue Answer

  • 1a Mail inits since 1971
  • 5a Carlton hotel chain
  • 9a Lettuce or cabbage
  • 14a Small recess
  • 15a Drill into
  • 16a Hero of Narnia in C S Lewis novels
  • 17a Evidence of a day at the beach
  • 19a In a deadpan manner
  • 21a Middle of a classic boast from Caesar
  • 22a Spanish girlfriend
  • 25a Chocolate confection with a molten core
  • 28a Partner of ceases
  • 31a Science is like Sometimes something useful comes out but that is not the reason we are doing it Richard Feynman
  • 32a Clerics title for short
  • 33a Tiki bar drink
  • 35a Part of a decent sized plot
  • 36a Effect of secondhand pot smoke
  • 39a Uber fan
  • 41a Ted author of the best selling short story collection Exhalation
  • 42a Make a mistake
  • 43a Well lah di
  • 45a Made an irreverently sarcastic comment
  • 49a Flight of fancy
  • 52a Crooner Mel who was called The Velvet Fog
  • 53a Common sight along the Norwegian coast
  • 54a Male admirer
  • 57a Signature Obama achievement in brief
  • 58a Held on to
  • 59a Description of 17 25 36 and 49 Across in different senses
  • 61a Where its at
  • 62a Afghans place
  • 63a Bottom of a boat
  • 64a Army squad leaders Abbr
  • 65a Rudely welcome the away team
  • 66a Toy Story boy

books review crossword puzzle clue

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The Crossword Solver

Books review , 5 letters

Here you will find the answer to the Books review crossword clue with 5 letters that was last seen April 3 2020. The list below contains all the answers and solutions for "Books review" from the crosswords and other puzzles, sorted by rating.

Related Clues for Books review

  • Investigation of a tax return
  • Sit in on, as a class
  • Sit in on, as a college class
  • Taxpayer’s dread
  • Tax inspection
  • Accounting inspection
  • Financial inspection by an independent body
  • Formal review of a company's tax filings
  • Legal, financial inspection of a business
  • Thorough check
  • Accountant's investigation

Latest Clues

  • Ash-storing container
  • Unbroken, complete
  • Freedom from danger or harm
  • Large physical body in space; we live on one
  • __ weensy, tiny
  • Month between July and September
  • Stages, periods
  • Internet abbreviation for take your time
  • Tidiness or praise for having good handwriting
  • Put on sore skin after being on the beach all day
  • Spanish, Mandarin, Arabic
  • Shade such as red, yellow, pink
  • Greek letter that looks like a trident
  • First name of the singer of Love is a Battlefield
  • Multiples of direction opposite west
  • Eerie white humanoid sea creature in Japanese myth
  • Something that has had the creases smoothed out
  • Projectile shot by a bow
  • Novel and TV miniseries of a family's history
  • This auto brand is known for its Sierra and Yukon
  • Domain name system
  • Sugar, honey, and candy all have this quality

JosephCrosswordAnswers.com

  • Thomas Joseph Crossword
  • February 3 2024

Books reviewer

While searching our database we found 1 possible solution for the: Books reviewer crossword clue.  This crossword clue was last seen on February 3 2024 Thomas Joseph Crossword puzzle . The solution we have for Books reviewer has a total of 7 letters.

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Related Clues

Other february 3 2024 puzzle clues.

There are a total of 47 clues in February 3 2024 crossword puzzle.

  • Like some pools
  • Francis of TV

If you have already solved this crossword clue and are looking for the main post then head over to Thomas Joseph Crossword February 3 2024 Answers

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  • Thomas Joseph Crossword February 21 2024 Answers

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There are a total of 1 crossword puzzles on our site and 37,209 clues.

The shortest answer in our database is TAB which contains 3 Characters.

Bar bill is the crossword clue of the shortest answer.

The longest answer in our database is BELMONTSTAKES which contains 13 Characters.

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What Turned Crossword Constructing Into a Boys’ Club?

By Anna Shechtman

Women standing on a crossword puzzle.

In July, 2013, Will Shortz , the New York Times’ longtime puzzle editor, asked me to be his assistant. I had just graduated from college, and, to my mind, the invitation had little rationale. It arrived on the heels of minimal correspondence: two e-mails in which Shortz had accepted two of my puzzles, with minor revisions. I doubted his motives for hiring me as much as my qualifications for the job. Surely, there were many more prolific and talented crossword constructors who could have assisted him. The only thing that distinguished me, I thought, was my gender: I was a young woman, and this was a field rife with men. Shortz was clear that I would work with him between September and the following May, when his longtime summer assistant, Joel Fagliano, would graduate and take up the job full time. I assumed, in other words, that I was not only a pinch hitter but a diversity hire.

This account has since been humbled by the memory of my in-box, which holds a much more extensive correspondence between me and Shortz. I had selectively remembered the two acceptances but forgotten three rejections. I had also repressed a long chain of e-mails about a potential Bloomsday puzzle, commemorating the publication of Joyce’s “ Ulysses ,” which he vetoed. (“For solvers who aren’t familiar with “Ulysses”—which would be a large number of people—I don’t think this puzzle would be very satisfying.”) Apparently, I had been courting Shortz’s attention and approval for three years. And, once I got it, I negated it. My revisionist history protected my ego (only two e-mails, two acceptances), but it also exposed me to more ego-withering insecurity (Shortz barely knew me; I had no track record). If my gender hadn’t informed Shortz’s offer, it had deformed my self-image as a worker: my ambition was offset by suspicion, and my efforts were overshadowed by a large chip on my shoulder.

I’m not sure how I knew that most crossword constructors were men. I had never met a constructor, nor scrutinized puzzle bylines. If anything, the puzzles that I enjoyed most were those in New York magazine by Maura Jacobson, who, for thirty-one years, wrote weekly puzzles that were loaded with puns and consistently avoided the most common pitfalls of crossword construction, dull repetition and excruciating corniness. But despite Jacobson, and despite the fact that I had been making crosswords since I was a teen-ager, somehow I knew that to think of crossword constructors today—if one thinks of them at all—is to think of men. And not just any men, but a particular kind of American man: white, STEM -educated, and charmingly (or brazenly) undersocialized.

If my understanding of Shortz’s motives for hiring me was a paranoid misread—ungenerous to both of us—my premonitions about the demographics and ethos of puzzle-making were eventually confirmed. Although data on the gender of crossword constructors before the so-called Shortz Era is incomplete—many puzzles were published without a byline or under pseudonyms, for example, and the numbers largely fail to account for trans and nonbinary constructors—several efforts have been made to trace these trends. One constructor determined that under the two editors before Shortz, Will Weng (1969-77) and Eugene Maleska (1977-93), women constructed approximately thirty-five per cent of all published puzzles. Between 1993 and 2013, women accounted for only nineteen per cent. There is reason to think that the share of women crossword constructors over all, not just in the Times , also declined during this period. According to Antony Lewis, the developer of the crossword-construction software Crossword Compiler, women accounted for roughly forty-five per cent of the company’s U.S. purchases in 2000, but by 2020 that number had fallen to about thirty-five per cent.

Lewis’s numbers still seem to outpace those of women published in wide-circulation newspapers. Looking at the statistics together, one is tempted to use them as a basis for speculation. Are women downloading constructing software but just not using it? Are they using it, but not very well? Are they using it well but not being published? In other words, is the problem time, facility, or bias? In an e-mail to me, Lewis implied another theory. His data, he wrote, include “people like teachers making educational puzzles, who may have distinct demographics from the newspaper folk.” His suggestion, as I understood it, was that women may be downloading his software but using it only in feminized professions, or jobs that women are more prone to do, such as teaching, whereas men are using it in professions where they hold leadership positions, including publishing.

Although I didn’t know it when I started working for Shortz, the early life of the crossword was indelibly shaped by women. The founding editor of the New York Times crossword, who oversaw the section from 1942 to 1968, was Margaret Petherbridge Farrar . Many of the most significant contributions to crossword culture—the first crossword contest, the rules for the grid’s symmetry and design—were pioneered by women who, like Farrar, found in the puzzle an intellectual outlet and an escape from the doldrums of housework. For decades, crossword constructing was a pastime conflated with first-wave feminists and bored housewives. How did it become an industry so male-dominated that its gender gap is now tracked by men who are prominent in the field?

One set of potential explanations lies in the digitization of crossword construction, which began in the nineteen-nineties and flourished in the early two-thousands with programs like Crossword Compiler. Although the rise of this kind of software doesn’t fully explain the masculinization of crossword labor and culture, it does offer some clues. The connection between computing and the demographics of constructing was first brought to my attention at the American Crossword Puzzle Tournament in 2014, when the topic of the field’s gender trouble was broached by an unlikely messenger: the seventeen-year-old puzzle wunderkind David Steinberg.

In a presentation he delivered based on data collected for his high-school science-research course, Steinberg proposed that as puzzle-making became increasingly informed by computer programming it began to replicate the imbalance of tech culture. Digitally assisted crossword-making, he argued, had changed the way the pursuit was perceived, altering its image from one associated with—or at least neutral toward—women to one unwelcoming of them. He invoked “numerous studies” suggesting that “females are far less likely than males to enter computer and other technology-related fields,” and hypothesized that as the practice of puzzle-making moved from graph paper and dictionaries to word databases and algorithms, it became less of a “literary exercise” and more of a “mathematical” one. Women, he posited, may have been “left behind” as a result.

Still constructing puzzles by hand, a woman alienated by the field’s digital turn, I considered his findings troublingly reductive, even as I confirmed them. One doesn’t need to know how to code to use constructing software, but, by 2014, the sensibility of crossword culture seemed to have merged with that of Silicon Valley. Aimee Lucido and Zoe Wheeler, two young women constructors who published their first puzzles in the Times around when I did, went on to work at Facebook and complete a master’s degree in computer science, respectively.

The history of computer programming itself is a useful paradigm for understanding the lack of women making puzzles today. It, too, is an industry in which women originally flourished but which, in the second half of the twentieth century, became a field led by men, its labor coded as masculine. During the Second World War, the realm of programming was regarded as meticulous and repetitive, and therefore ideal for women workers. Programming was considered clerical work, an extension of the secretarial pool, itself an extension of women’s work in the home—straightening, organizing, and managing the operations of the family unit. As a result, many of the earliest computer specialists were women—employees of corporations or wartime government agencies whose job was to crunch numbers by hand and to input data into the earliest electronic computer prototypes.

These women, who were referred to as “computers,” have resurfaced in popular culture with the success of the 2016 film “ Hidden Figures ,” which depicted the largely Black team of women whose work was essential to NASA ’s operations during the space race. Although they are much less widely known than the women who took on manual jobs during wartime (crystallized in the figure of Rosie the Riveter ), women with college degrees—especially degrees in math and engineering—were also newly encouraged to participate in the workforce. The government explicitly enlisted these highly educated women, who might otherwise have sought jobs as teachers, perhaps working only until they were married, to work with early computers, performing calculations underpinning ballistics operations and decrypting Japanese and German codes. They became experts at using the earliest general-purpose electronic computer, the ENIAC , encoding information so it could be legible to the machine. Women such as Adele Goldstine, Grace Hopper, Kay McNulty, and Betty Snyder developed early computing languages and debugging methods, becoming some of the nation’s earliest and most adept programmers, underrated as that label (and their work) was at the time.

Although crossword constructors were not explicitly sex-typed by employers, as computer programmers were, the requirements for being a good programmer aligned closely with those of crossword enthusiasts. Or at least the U.S. government thought so. As Liza Mundy wrote in “ Code Girls ,” her comprehensive history of female code breakers during the Second World War, women graduating from élite private colleges were asked two questions before being recruited for computer-programming jobs: (1) Do you like crossword puzzles? and (2) Are you engaged? In the middle of the twentieth century, before the advent of the computer-nerd and tech-bro stereotypes, crosswords and computing were not seen as markers of intelligence per se. But they were evidence of a woman’s shrewdness, work ethic, and fastidiousness—all highly compatible with the mid-century workforce, so long as she wasn’t yet committed to building a home.

Computer programming began to be perceived as a job suited for men only after technical innovations allowed its grunt work (encoding, debugging) to be done by the computer itself. That women eventually stopped being as involved, or involved at high levels, in the field isn’t because they stopped being good at the job once more aspects of it were computerized, nor because the job required a higher or different kind of intelligence. It is, rather, because the work of the computer began to overlap neatly with the kind of work that women had been encouraged to do. Once computers took on that support work, women either had to fight for jobs that had historically gone to men, or were once more relegated to the narrow set of opportunities that had previously been available to them.

This white-collar warfare between woman and machine is acutely dramatized in “Desk Set,” a 1957 romantic comedy starring Katharine Hepburn  and Spencer Tracy. In the film, Hepburn plays Miss Watson, the head of the Reference Department of the fictional Federal Broadcasting Company, while Tracy plays Richard Sumner, the inventor of an electronic computer known as the EMERAC (or Emmy). Watson’s job is to be on hand for television broadcast announcers, answering questions about topics as various as which poisons leave no trace and which baseball player has the highest lifetime batting average. (Apparently, she knows facts like these from memory—like Alexa or Siri, she’s a data repository personified.) An efficiency expert, Sumner designs Emmy to answer any question about as fast as Miss Watson can; the all-women staff of her department worry that, as a result, they’ll be replaced. By the end of the film, the twinned threats of Sumner’s invention and Watson’s intelligence have been efficiently neutralized, and Miss Watson is no longer a “miss” at all: the couple get engaged; they embrace; and the mainframe computer spells out the words “ THE END .”

But is that really the end? We imagine that Watson has left her job to become a wife, but what is she to do with all that free-floating knowledge—the origin of every Bible quotation, the words to every Longfellow poem—that she’s flaunted throughout the film? Maybe she’ll start writing crossword puzzles.

There is no reason to believe that men are better crossword constructors or solvers than women. Crossword culture has, however, been shaped by technological, economic, and social forces that have led women to feel unwelcome, underutilized, and underestimated in its already niche community. If Mrs. Sumner (née Watson) had turned to puzzle-making, in other words, the very forces that would have displaced her from her first job might have edged her out of constructing, too.

But it is not just the née Watsons among us who have been affected: the masculinization of puzzle labor leaves its trace all over the contents of today’s crosswords, not just their conditions of production. Editors in wide-circulation newspapers want their puzzles to be solvable by a large portion of their readership. This policy of inclusion—which has some editors imagining a Platonic crossword solver, unmarked by gender or race—can lead to a tacit policy of exclusion. All crossword editing involves judgment calls about language and its use that could hardly be called politically neutral, and, ultimately, the question of a word or phrase’s “puzzle-worthiness” is a negotiation between the constructor’s voice and that of a publication’s house style—a style usually set to the sensibility of its puzzle section’s editor. A list of terms rejected by the white, male, longtime puzzle editors of major newspapers in the past ten years, compiled by myself and by fellow-constructors, includes:

MATCHA (which the editor deemed not “well-known”) LAVERNE COX (he didn’t know who she was) MARIE KONDO (“unusual last name”) RIOTGRRRL (“just too edgy”) MALE GAZE (not “puzzle-worthy”) SI SE PUEDE (“obscure”) HBCU (“too obscure”) SNCC (“virtually impossible to sort out its meaning”)

Looking at entries like these together, we begin to see a pattern: they refer to women, woman-produced culture, and phenomena and objects with origins in nonwhite cultures.

The question of which entries—and whose culture—can be deemed “mainstream” or “relevant” has high stakes for the fate of this lively art. It is intuitively but not necessarily true that a woman constructor will include in her grid references to “women’s culture” and “women’s language,” imprecise as those concepts may be. The constructor Elizabeth Gorski, for example, has added a staggering fifteen hundred and fourteen unique terms to the Times crossword lexicon, including ANNE SEXTON , CHICK FLICK , TUBE TOPS , and STATESWOMEN . Soleil Saint-Cyr and Portia Lundie, who are the first and second Black women Shortz knows of who have published crosswords in the print edition of the Times , introduced five new phrases in their 2021 débuts, including LET YOUR HAIR DOWN and ESSENTIAL WORKER .

Since 2014, the puzzle industry has changed dramatically, in part because members of the community are more willing to discuss the effects of implicit bias. In 2020, I was part of a group of constructors and avid solvers who wrote an open letter encouraging the Times to diversify its editorial staff. Since then, it has made several new hires and changed its submission process to be more transparent. New outlets have also proliferated, including a host of indie crossword sites, some of which explicitly publish puzzles by women for women. The incessant gender-tracking among crossword constructors publishing in these and other outlets has been accompanied by diversity initiatives meant to mentor women constructors and foster their talents. The result of these various efforts may be to rediscover the woman in the crossword puzzle—the housewife, the feminist, the computer. She was, after all, always there. ♦

This is drawn from “ The Riddles of the Sphinx: Inheriting the Feminist History of the Crossword Puzzle .”

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  • Crossword Tips

Clue: Review of the books

Referring crossword puzzle answers, likely related crossword puzzle clues.

  • One for the books?
  • Taxpayer's dread
  • Inspection of accounts
  • Accounting inspection
  • Tax cheat's worry
  • Taxing ordeal?
  • Book review?

Recent usage in crossword puzzles:

  • WSJ Daily - Feb. 27, 2019
  • Washington Post - Dec. 15, 2016
  • NY Sun - July 30, 2007
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Flight of Fancy

Robert S. Gard senses a novel opportunity.

A black-and-white photo of Hugh Hefner, seated on a large plush bed in his private airliner, accepting a drink from a flight attendant.

By Sam Corbin

Jump to: Today’s Theme | Tricky Clues

TUESDAY PUZZLE — This is Robert S. Gard’s second crossword for The New York Times and his first crack at a theme set. His first grid, published in September 2023, was a themeless Saturday .

Given what I would call a successful themed debut, I find Mr. Gard’s choice of revealer almost paradoxical. Did he second-guess his own talent while constructing, and subconsciously lace his self-doubt into the grid? Or is this just my inner 36-Down reading too deeply into things, as usual? Let’s dive in and find out together.

Today’s Theme

Cracking Mr. Gard’s theme requires nothing more than an appreciation of how one expression — “in different senses” (59A), our revealer winks — might apply to the entries at 17-, 25-, 36- and 49-Across.

What do the “Evidence of a day at the beach” (17A) and a “Chocolate confection with a molten core” (25A) have in common? The answer isn’t immediately evident from the clues’ entries: BIKINI TAN, LAVA CAKE. They both involve warmth, at least.

This theory gains shape farther down with a “Flight of fancy” (49A) — a WILD IDEA — which cooks in its own way, too. It all comes together, I think, with the “Effect of secondhand pot smoke” (36A), otherwise known as a CONTACT HIGH.

With a few crossing hints, we can discern the clever reference, at 59-Across, to someone partially under the influence: HALF-BAKED. The same phrase applies to a light tan, a molten cake or an idea that’s not fully formed.

Tricky Clues

9A. Every time I turn my head, someone comes up with a new — or teaches me about an old — slang term for money. It seems either “Lettuce or cabbage” can mean MOOLA.

23A. If you came to this column in the hopes of reading a defiant castigation of the entry at 23-Across, then “Phooey!” — or better yet, NERTS. It turns out this word dates to 1932 American college slang, as a euphemistic pronunciation of the interjection “nuts!”

61A. The ambiguity of “Where it’s at” had my head spinning, especially given earlier slang hints. “Where it’s at” can refer to being hip, but here the answer is deceptively straightforward: a VENUE.

11D. A “Member of a powerful ruling elite” is an OLIGARCH. Delving into this word’s origins and related terms led me to the discovery of an anarch , which the Online Etymology Dictionary describes as a “delicious paradox-word” meaning “leader of leaderlessness.”

43D. The word for “Funereal compositions,” given the occasion it refers to, shouldn’t be as delightful as it is — but I do love saying DIRGES. I guess I’ve got urges for DIRGES (I cry, as I am gently escorted from the funeral home).

Constructor Notes

Awesome to see my Times themed debut in print! Last summer, my wife and I were off on a seaside jaunt when the subject of 17-Across naturally arose. One throwaway pun led to 59-Across, which then led to this puzzle. Happy to rely on happenstance for this one. As always, I would like to thank those who took an early peek — for, well, you know, peeking.

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  • LA Times Crossword
  • February 20 2024

Some puzzle book offerings

While searching our database we found 1 possible solution for the: Some puzzle book offerings crossword clue.  This crossword clue was last seen on February 20 2024 LA Times Crossword puzzle . The solution we have for Some puzzle book offerings has a total of 5 letters.

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Related clues.

We have found 2 other crossword clues with the same answer.

  • Lab rats challenges
  • Confounding layouts

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We have found 0 other crossword answers for this clue.

Other February 20 2024 Puzzle Clues

There are a total of 77 clues in February 20 2024 crossword puzzle.

  • Spanish title
  • Triangular river formations
  • Alias letters
  • Low rapper __ Rida
  • Garçons workplace

If you have already solved this crossword clue and are looking for the main post then head over to LA Times Crossword February 20 2024 Answers

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There are a total of 1 crossword puzzles on our site and 163,865 clues.

The shortest answer in our database is ESP which contains 3 Characters.

Telepaths claim is the crossword clue of the shortest answer.

The longest answer in our database is YOUDESERVEABREAKTODAY which contains 21 Characters.

... for aspiring entertainers? is the crossword clue of the longest answer.

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NYT Connections Answers And Hints - February 21, 2024 Solution #255

Need a hand sorting your cats from your hounds? Here are today's Connections puzzle hints.

It's a new day and that means a new puzzle wall to solve in the New York Times's Connections game. If you're looking to save your streak and only want to nail down that last pesky category, don't worry - we have all the hints you could need.

Split image black and white bridge viewfinder, violet room antichamber, and industrial area the pedestrian.

10 Best Indie Puzzle Games

You'll find everything you need below, from vague hints as to what you should be looking for to the outright answers. Whether you're looking for a nudge in the right direction or a sneaky way to preserve your blemish-free record, you've come to the right place.

If you're here by mistake and instead need the answers for February 20 , click here .

Category Hints

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Today's puzzle relies a little on specialist knowledge.

We'll present these hints from the easiest category to the hardest , as prescribed by the puzzle itself - Yellow, Green, Blue, then Purple.

If you want today's category hints, click below ! These will not spoil the actual names of the categories but will nudge you in the right direction.

Connections banner - Spoilers in green

Today's yellow category is annoying. Literally .

Today's green category has a musical bent.

Today's blue category has items that all share a feature.

Today's purple category concerns well-known phrases that all begin with the same two words.

Herring Watch: There are a lot of animals here, but don't be distracted by them.

Today's Answers

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Today's puzzle has some pretty 'out-there' categories.

If you want today's answers, click below !

Connections banner - Spoilers in purple

Today's answers are listed below:

Yellow Category : Pesters

Badgers, Bugs, Hounds, Nags

Green Category : Tony Winners For Best Musical

Annie, Cabaret, Cats, Company

Blue Category : They Have Keys

Computer, Piano, Super, Tests

Purple Category : School Of _____

Fish, Hard Knocks, Rock, Thought

Mobile Phone Text Games 4 pics 1 word words with friends and pictoword

Mobile Games That Can Improve Your Vocabulary

Today's Wordle answer for Tuesday, February 20

Trouble solving today's Wordle? Here's the help you need.

Wordle today being played on a phone

  • Wordle hint
  • Today's answer
  • Previous answers

Give your daily Wordle game a helping hand with our brilliant range of tips and tricks. Keep scrolling and you'll soon find everything from a guided clue for the February 20 (976), helping to keep your own guesses on track, to today's Wordle answer. Whatever you need, we've got it.

I couldn't have asked for a better start today. After two guesses I had a pair of greens and yellows to work with, and in theory, that meant the answer was within easy reach. In practice my brain decided to wander off without me, leaving me with no idea what to fill that final gap with for a few embarrassing minutes. Oh dear.

Today's Wordle hint

Wordle today: a hint for tuesday, february 20.

This could describe some sort of sporting game or competition—between football teams, for example. The same word can also refer to a small thin stick coated with a chemical at one end, used to light candles, amongst other things. 

Is there a double letter in Wordle today? 

There are no double letters in today's Wordle.  

Wordle help: 3 tips for beating Wordle every day 

Looking to extend your Wordle winning streak? Perhaps you've just started playing the popular daily puzzle game and are looking for some pointers. Whatever the reason you're here, these quick tips can help push you in the right direction: 

  • Start with a word that has a mix of common vowels and consonants. 
  • The answer might repeat the same letter.
  • Try not to use guesses that include letters you've already eliminated. 

There's no racing against the clock with Wordle so you don't need to rush for the answer. Treating the game like a casual newspaper crossword can be a good tactic; that way, you can come back to it later if you're coming up blank. Stepping away for a while might mean the difference between a win and a line of grey squares. 

Today's Wordle answer

What is today's wordle answer.

Here's a little help. The answer to the February 20 (976) Wordle is MATCH .

Previous Wordle answers

The last 10 wordle answers .

Wordle solutions that have already been used can help eliminate answers for today's Wordle or give you inspiration for guesses to help uncover more of those greens. They can also give you some inspired ideas for starting words that keep your daily puzzle-solving fresh.

Here are some recent Wordle answers:

  • February 19: PRICE
  • February 18:  RIDGE
  • February 17:  PSALM
  • February 16:  STASH
  • February 15:  ASCOT
  • February 14:  TALON
  • February 13:  SCRAM
  • February 12:  PASTA
  • February 11:  NEVER
  • February 10:  FRIED

Learn more about Wordle 

Wordle gives you six rows of five boxes each day, and it's up to you to work out which five-letter word is hiding among them to win the popular daily puzzle.

It's usually a good plan to start with a strong word like ALERT—or any other word with a good mix of common consonants and multiple vowels—and you should be off to a flying start, with a little luck anyway. You should also avoid starting words with repeating letters, so you don't waste the chance to confirm or eliminate an extra letter. Once you hit Enter, you'll see which letters you've got right or wrong. If a box turns ⬛️, it means that letter isn't in the secret word at all. 🟨 means the letter is in the word, but not in that position. 🟩 means you've got the right letter in the right spot.

Your second guess should compliment the first, using another "good" word to cover any common letters you might have missed on the first row—just don't forget to leave out any letter you now know for a fact isn't present in today's answer. After that, it's just a case of using what you've learned to narrow your guesses down to the correct word. You have six tries in total and can only use real words and don't forget letters can repeat too (eg: BOOKS).

If you need any further advice feel free to check out our Wordle tips , and if you'd like to find out which words have already been used, you can scroll to the relevant section above.

Originally, Wordle was dreamed up by software engineer Josh Wardle , as a surprise for his partner who loves word games. From there it spread to his family, and finally got released to the public. The word puzzle game has since inspired tons of games like Wordle , refocusing the daily gimmick around music or math or geography. It wasn't long before Wordle became so popular it was sold to the New York Times for seven figures . Surely it's only a matter of time before we all solely communicate in tricolor boxes. 

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Kerry Brunskill

When baby Kerry was brought home from the hospital her hand was placed on the space bar of the family Atari 400, a small act of parental nerdery that has snowballed into a lifelong passion for gaming and the sort of freelance job her school careers advisor told her she couldn't do. She's now PC Gamer's word game expert, taking on the daily Wordle puzzle to give readers a hint each and every day. Her Wordle streak is truly mighty.

Somehow Kerry managed to get away with writing regular features on  old Japanese PC games , telling today's PC gamers about some of the most fascinating and influential games of the '80s and '90s.

Sega's upcoming Crazy Taxi reboot will be a 'triple-A' game

Please behold the glory of the PowerWash Simulator x Warhammer 40K DLC trailer, with release to follow this month

Capcom celebrates the 8th anniversary of Street Fighter V by saying sorry for Street Fighter V

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  1. Crossword puzzle

COMMENTS

  1. Book review Crossword Clue

    The Crossword Solver found 30 answers to "Book review", 8 letters crossword clue. The Crossword Solver finds answers to classic crosswords and cryptic crossword puzzles. Enter the length or pattern for better results. Click the answer to find similar crossword clues . Enter a Crossword Clue Sort by Length # of Letters or Pattern Dictionary

  2. Books review crossword clue

    May 31 2021 Books review Books review While searching our database we found 1 possible solution for the: Books review crossword clue. This crossword clue was last seen on May 31 2021 LA Times Crossword puzzle. The solution we have for Books review has a total of 5 letters. Recent Usage: LA Times: May 31, 2021 Related Clues

  3. Book review? crossword clue

    Stud farm stud If you have already solved this crossword clue and are looking for the main post then head over to LA Times Crossword November 23 2022 Answers On this page you will find the Book review? crossword clue answers and solutions. This clue was last seen on November 23 2022 at the popular LA Times Crossword Puzzle

  4. Book review? crossword clue

    While searching our database we found 1 possible solution for the: Book review? crossword clue. This crossword clue was last seen on November 23 2022 LA Times Crossword puzzle. The solution we have for Book review? has a total of 5 letters. Answer A U D I T Share the Answer! The word AUDIT is a 5 letter word that has 2 syllable's.

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    EXCERPTS By CrosswordSolver IO. Refine the search results by specifying the number of letters. If certain letters are known already, you can provide them in the form of a pattern: "CA????". Recent Clues Card Table Fabric Crossword Clue Workshop Shaver Crossword Clue Halloween Month: Abbr. Crossword Clue Pub Offering, For Short Crossword Clue

  6. A Tricky Tribute to the Book Review's 125th Anniversary

    So it's only natural that as part of our 125th anniversary celebration, we're offering readers a crossword puzzle crammed with clues about books, authors, literary trends and fictional ...

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    Books Review? Crossword Clue. We found 20 possible solutions for this clue. We think the likely answer to this clue is AUDIT. You can easily improve your search by specifying the number of letters in the answer. ... We use historic puzzles to find the best matches for your question. We add many new clues on a daily basis.

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    Book Review? Crossword Clue. We found 20 possible solutions for this clue. We think the likely answer to this clue is AUDIT. You can easily improve your search by specifying the number of letters in the answer. ... We use historic puzzles to find the best matches for your question. We add many new clues on a daily basis.

  9. Book review?

    Recent usage in crossword puzzles: LA Times - Nov. 23, 2022; Penny Dell - Jan. 8, 2019; Premier Sunday - Oct. 4, 2015; New York Times - Jan. 11, 2014

  10. Book review

    Book review is a crossword puzzle clue that we have spotted 1 time. There are related clues (shown below). Referring crossword puzzle answers AUDIT Likely related crossword puzzle clues Sort A-Z Examine Verify One for the books? Taxpayer's dread Inspection of accounts Sit in on Accounting inspection Tax cheat's worry Book review? Financial review

  11. Book reviewer? NYT Crossword

    BOOK REVIEWER NYT Crossword Clue Answer. CPA. This clue was last seen on NYTimes November 27, 2021 Puzzle. If you are done solving this clue take a look below to the other clues found on today's puzzle in case you may need help with any of them. In front of each clue we have added its number and position on the crossword puzzle for easier ...

  12. Feature of The New York Review of Books NYT Crossword

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    Here you will find the answer to the Book review? crossword clue with 5 letters that was last seen December 12 2023. The list below contains all the answers and solutions for "Book review?" from the crosswords and other puzzles, sorted by rating. Related Clues for Book review? IRS action Thorough check Taxpayer's dread Sit in on, as a class

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    Here you will find the answer to the Books review? crossword clue with 5 letters that was last seen April 3 2020. The list below contains all the answers and solutions for "Books review?" ... from the crosswords and other puzzles, sorted by rating. Rating Answer Lenght Clue; 100%: AUDIT: 5: Books review? 99%: AUDIT: 5: Book review? 88%: PLOT: 4 ...

  15. Books reviewer crossword clue 7 Letters

    February 3 2024 Books reviewer Books reviewer While searching our database we found 1 possible solution for the: Books reviewer crossword clue. This crossword clue was last seen on February 3 2024 Thomas Joseph Crossword puzzle. The solution we have for Books reviewer has a total of 7 letters. Answer A U D I T O R Subcribe To Our Newsletter

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  17. Review of the books Crossword Clue

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    Books review. Today's crossword puzzle clue is a quick one: Books review. We will try to find the right answer to this particular crossword clue. Here are the possible solutions for "Books review" clue. It was last seen in Daily quick crossword. We have 1 possible answer in our database.

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  20. Books review?

    Books review? is a crossword puzzle clue that we have spotted 1 time. There are related clues (shown below). Referring crossword puzzle answers AUDIT Likely related crossword puzzle clues Sort A-Z Examine Verify One for the books? Taxpayer's dread Inspection of accounts Sit in on Accounting inspection Tax cheat's worry Book review? Financial review

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  22. Review of the books

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  23. NYT Crossword Answers for Feb. 20, 2024

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    There are a total of 1 crossword puzzles on our site and 163,865 clues. The shortest answer in our database is ESP which contains 3 Characters. Telepaths claim is the crossword clue of the shortest answer. The longest answer in our database is YOUDESERVEABREAKTODAY which contains 21 Characters.

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    Here are today's Connections puzzle hints. Need a hand sorting your cats from your hounds? Here are today's Connections puzzle hints. ... How Soma Games Brought The Beloved Redwall Children's Book Series To A New Medium Wordle Answer And Hints - February 19, 2024 Solution #975 9:15. Pacific Drive Review - Refuelling The Roguelike Genre Join ...

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  28. Wordle today: Answer and hint #976 for February 20

    Give your daily Wordle game a helping hand with our brilliant range of tips and tricks. Keep scrolling and you'll soon find everything from a guided clue for the February 20 (976), helping to keep ...